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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

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oi Andover 



1996 Annual Report 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto1996ando 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



1996 ANNUAL REPORT 



PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 



PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 



SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 



ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 



THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



COVER PHOTO OF THE 350TH ANNIVERSARY 
QUILT WHICH HANGS IN THE MEMORIAL HALL 
LIBRARY IS COURTESY OF ANGELINA CAIATI 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 
(508) 623-8200 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover: 



There are three very specific dates in the year 1996 that represent milestones to the Town in 
three different yet significant ways: May 6th, September 4th and November 18th. 

On May 6th, Andover' s Founders Day, the Selectmen celebrated the 350th Anniversary of 
the Town by meeting jointly with His Worship Ian Carr, Mayor of Andover, England, and Councillors 
Roache and Taylor. This historic date was the occasion of a Selectmen's meeting where the 
Selectmen of Andover and the Mayor and Councillors of Andover, England jointly exchanged gifts 
of friendship and symbols of our respective and intertwined histories. 

On September 4th, Andover Public Schools opened on time! The predictions that Andover 
High School would not open on Wednesday, September 4th due to construction delays did not come 
to pass because of the concerted, determined and focused efforts of the School Building Committee, 
School Administration, Town Departments, the architects and the project manager. Also on this day, 
the Sanborn Elementary School addition and renovation project was completed and the elementary 
students eagerly enjoyed this newly refurbished facility. 

On November 18th, Moody's Investor Services increased the Town of Andover' s bond rating 
from Aa to Aal. This upgrade is significant because it will reduce the cost of borrowing now and 
in the future and, most importantly, it recognizes the Town for achieving fiscal excellence! The 
Town's financial officers had been working for many years to obtain this status. Less than 2% of the 
cities and towns in Massachusetts have a ranking of Aal or better. 

Mother Nature unleashed her fury on the Merrimack Valley in 1996 and gave us historic 
weather events. The Winter of 1996 proved to be one of the most significant snow winters on 
record with over 130 inches of snow accumulating. In mid-October, the Town experienced a rain 
and flood event that was characterized as the "flood of the century". In early December the Valley 
received several inches of wet snow followed by a deep freeze that resulted in many trees and limbs 
falling on power lines resulting in massive power outages throughout the community. Many areas 
of Town were without power for several days and the tree and limb cleanup took several months. 



The Honorable Board of Selectmen and 

Citizens of Andover 
Page Two 



The Town was selected by the Massachusetts Municipal Association as a recipient of the 
Kenneth E. Pickard Municipal Innovation Award. The Town won this award as part of an innovative 
consortium with Arlington, Bedford and Danvers formed to provide continuous quality improvement 
training to employees. 

The Town and the Memorial Hall Library both inaugurated home pages on the worldwide 
web. If you are surfing the net, the Town's home page address is "www.town.andover.ma.us" and 
the Library's home page address is "www.mhl.org". 

During the year, four long-time employees retired - Fire Chief Harold F. Hayes with over 
thirty-five years of service, Patrolman Richard Aumais with over thirty-seven years of service, 
Detective David Grant with over twenty-eight years of service and Library employee Sydelle Cohen 
with over eighteen years of service. Also, James J. Brightney, Director of Municipal Maintenance, 
announced his pending retirement in 1997. The Town's best wishes are extended to them in their 
retirement. Harold J. Wright was selected to replace Harold F. Hayes as Andover's Fire Chief. 
Joseph R. Piantedosi was selected to replace James J. Brightney as the Facilities Director of the 
Department of Municipal Maintenance. 

1996 was a year of challenge and opportunity. I would like to thank James M. Barenboim, 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, and the Board for their leadership and support during the year. 
I would also like to thank the Town Department Heads, employees and volunteers who serve on 
Town committees and boards for their dedication to public service and commitment to excellence. 

You can help the Town of Andover carry on the spirit of community involvement and citizen 
volunteerism that characterized our 350th Anniversary year by voting in the Annual Town Election 
on March 24th and participating in the Annual Town Meeting on April 14, 15th and 16th. 

Respectfully submitted, 




T 



<a£c(^/j ' v 



Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 




2 

OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (508) 470-3800 



0—M*mii, IM 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover. MA 01810 
(508) 623-8200 



Dear Citizens of Andover: 

In 1996 the Town celebrated its 350th Anniversary. We started with an Inaugural event on 
a snowy Sunday in January and ended in early December with the placing of a time capsule in the 
basement of the Town House. In between we came together with our friends and neighbors to 
commemorate the Town's birthday with a number of unique and exciting events. His Worship Ian 
Carr, the Mayor of Andover, England, and two of his Councillors and their wives spent a week with 
us in May commemorating Founders Day. Former President George Bush was the guest speaker at 
our Anniversary Banquet delivering a message of community values, the importance of volunteerism, 
and the need for public service. In June, our young people had an opportunity to enjoy "Main Street 
Madness". The success of this event was due, in part, to the leadership of the Board of Selectmen 
in keeping the event downtown and closing offMain Street on a Saturday. 

The Anniversary Parade was held on Sunday, September 15th. Unfortunately this date 
conflicted with the second day of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. When this conflict came 
to the attention of the Board, we initiated a series of meetings to discuss what could be done to 
address the date conflict. After much consideration, it was concluded that the planning was so far 
advanced that the date could not be changed. The Board felt that the selection of the date initially 
was an oversight, however, as community leaders we asked all citizens of Andover to come together 
to make the parade a successful event. 

At the Annual Town Election William T. Downs was re-elected for another term. In the Fall, 
Selectman Barry R. Finegold was elected to replace Gary M. Coon as the State Representative. The 
Board of Selectmen elected Charles H. Wesson, Jr. to fill the remainder of Mr. Finegold's term as 
a Selectman. 

At the Annual Town Meeting the voters approved a number of Capital Improvement Program 
projects including $1.5M for water system improvements and an additional $2.4M for the Andover 
High School addition and renovation project. The voters supported the creation of an adult use zone 
in the Zoning Bylaw. The voters rejected several anti-growth warrant articles including a building 
moratorium, development impact fees and other mechanisms to slow growth. The Champy land was 
re-zoned to allow for residential development. 



Citizens of Andover 
Pase Two 



In the Fall of 1996. I announced that I would not seek re-election as a Selectman. I have 
enjoyed my three terms of public service. I would like to take this opportunity to thank my fellow 
Selectmen, the two Town Managers, the Department Heads and Town employees who I have worked 
with during these nine years. Also. I must recognize the countless volunteers who give of their 
valuable time to serve on boards, committees and commissions of the Town. The townspeople 
should know that those entrusted to protect their public interest do so with high standards and 
professionalism. 

Thank vou for allowing me to serve vou and the Town of Andover as a Selectman. 



Sincerely, 

James M. Barenboim, Chairman 
Andover Board of Selectmen 



4 

OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (508) 470-3800 




350TH ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 



OFFICERS 

NORMA A. GAMMON 
Chairman 

JAMES D. DOHERTY 
Vice President 

FRED STOTT 

Treasurer 

M. LOUISE ORDMAN 

Secretary 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

VIRGINIA BEGG 
ANN CONSTANTINE 
Publicity Co-Chairman 

EDWARD COLE 

Main Street Display Chairman 

MARGARET R. CRONIN 

Artifacts Chairman 

JAMES D. DOHERTY 
Parade Chairman 

KAREN M. HERMAN 
Liason to Three Communities. 
(Andover, North Andover, Lawrence) 

STEPHEN KEARN 
Boston Pops Chairman 

DAVID F. LYNCH 
CHARLES H. MURNANEJr. 
Youth Activities Chairman 

ROBERT MACARTNEY 

Merchandising Chairman 

CYNTHIA MILNE 
Comptroller 

ROBERT W. PHINNEY 
Dinner Chairman 

V DAVID RODGER 
Writing & Poetry Chairman 

NED WILLIAMS 

Logo /Graphics Coordinator 



Andover' s 350th Anniversary - a year-long celebration - had so much power, energy, 
focus and enthusiasm it eventually assumed an identity all its own. Just as all children 
are unique and different, this child of Andover received encouragement, nourishment 
and commitment so powerful it grew to dimensions far exceeding any initial hopes or 
expectations. 

Imagine. Three years in the planning and legions of volunteers. Eighty-eight 
sponsored events. Major events which you can re-savor beginning with the Inaugural 
on January 21st; spending an afternoon captivated by the Pulitzer winning author, 
Dorothy Kearns Goodwin; staging a field day "Main Street Madness" for thousands 
of students; assembling 700 performers in an all-community musical extravaganza, 
"Let Music Swell the Breeze"; designing a series of forums on the topic "Andover at 
400"; a sell-out Anniversary Banquet with former President George Bush; a packed 
house for a rousing event with the Boston Pops; and, finally, to the largest parade in 
Andover' s history. 

We celebrated our past, present and future in truly memorable style. It brought us a 
sense of purpose, bondedness and united focus. It was a grand celebration! We 
should all be proud. We left our stamp on the history of Andover. 



Norma A. Gammon 

Chairman 

Andover 350th Celebration 



REPRESENTATIVES 

PAUL MURPHY 

Phillips Academy 

JAMES BATCHELDER 
Andover Historical Society 

IAMES REDMOND 
Andover Schools 

JOHN S. SULLIVAN 
Andover Historical Commission 



350™ CELEBRATION • ANDOVER TOWN HOUSE • ANDOVER MA O1810 



FINANCE & BUDGET DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide 
departments and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability 
and justification. 

FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 1996 Budget was released on January 
19, 1996. During the months of January, February and March, approximately twenty meetings 
were held with the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and department heads to review the 
budget and warrant article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

On March 28, 1996 the Finance Committee Report was mailed to 1 1,142 households. 
The Annual Town Meeting was held on April 8, 1996 and the Fiscal Year 1997 operating budget 
(Article 4) was adopted in the amount of $70,398,733. This budget was an increase of 6.9% from 
the fiscal year 1996 operating budget of $65,885,333. 

A Special Town meeting was held on October 23, 1996. The Finance Committee report 
was mailed to 1 1,148 households. 

The Andover Cable Advisory Committee continued its negotiations for the cable television 
license renewal. The current license expires in June, 1997. Continental Cablevision acquired TCI 
communities in Massachusetts, and its request for a license transfer was approved by the Board of 
Selectmen in June, 1996. Subsequently Continental Cablevision merged with US West. On 
August 19, 1996 the Board of Selectmen approved the transfer of the license from Continental to 
US West. Continental Cablevision will continue to provide cable services to Andover residents. 
Approximately 8,620 households subscribe to cable service. 

In October, the Town Manager released the FY1998-FY2002 Capital Improvement 
Program. This program totaled approximately $53 million in projects of which $13 million was 
recommended for FY 1 998. 

Town finance and planning officials spent considerable time working to upgrade the 
town's bond rating in conjunction with a $15.5 million bond sale. On November 18, Moody's 
released its report and upgraded Andover to Aal from Aa. Moody's stated, "The upgrade from 
Aa to Aal reflects the town's substantial and growing tax base combined with conservative debt 
management policies and well-maintained finances." On November 21, the town sold the bond 
issue at an interest rate of 4.95%. This sale completed the financing of the $40,500,000 school 
projects which were exempted from the limits of Proposition 2 ¥t. 



MOODY'S INVESTORS SERVICE 

MUNICIPAL CREDIT RATING DISTRIBUTION 

CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES 

(December 1996) 



Ratine 


United States 


Massachusetts 


Aaa 


2.3% 


4.0% 


Aal 


2.8 


1.8 


Aa 


12.6 


15.5 


Al 


21.3 


19.0 


A 


35.4 


39.8 


Baal 


13.5 


11.1 


Baa 


11.5 


6.6 


Below Baa 


0.7 


2.2 



CENTRAL PURCHASING 



During 1996 there were approximately 2,585 purchase orders processed for the Town, 
2,879 purchase orders processed for the School Department and 5,630 Requests for Payments. 
Approximately 56 bid opening were held in addition to 10 Requests for Proposals. The continued 
use of State bids and contracts has proved to be beneficial to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Under Massachusetts General Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly 
purchase a single item or a wide range of goods and services such as: paper products for copy 
machines, police vehicles, road salt, chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels and supplies. 



follows: 



Some examples of major bids and proposals put out by Central Purchasing in 1996 are as 



Bancroft School Chiller 

Installation of Chiller, Pumps and Fuel Oil Storage Tanks 

Re-roofing of the West Andover Fire Station 

Re-roofing and associated work at the West Middle School Gymnasium and Library 

cupola 

Replacement of windows at West Middle School 

Two automatic sliding doors for the Senior Center 

Miscellaneous furniture and equipment for the South School 

Brush Chipper 

Highway rock salt, solar salt and liquid calcium chloride 32% 

Memorial Hall Library ventilation system improvements 

Janitorial supplies 

Miscellaneous furniture and equipment for Andover High School 



Miscellaneous road materials 

Athletic equipment 

Cafeteria paper products 

Corridor lockers 

Doherty Middle School Gymnasium floor renovations - rubber sports flooring 

Water meters 

Re-carpeting five locations at Andover Public Schools 

Refurbish tennis courts at Recreation Park 

Commuter Park and Ride Lot Expansion 

Gymnasium equipment for Andover High School 

The Office of Central Purchasing is responsible for contract compliance regarding 
Andover' s Affirmative Action Plan, insurance coordination and risk management for all Town and 
School departments with the exception of health and personal insurance which is handled by the 
Personnel Department. 

Areas of importance in the early 90's where Central Purchasing and insurance coordination 
were able to save time and dollars for the Town are as follows: 

Collaborative bid on Gasoline & Diesel Fuel involving 12 towns 

Collaborative bid on copy machine paper involving 7 towns 

Introduction of a new catastrophe Accident Medical Insurance or Interscholastic Athletics 

Coverage for all Interscholastic Athletics and Band activities 

Introduction of various other insurance coverages available to students throughout the 

year 

Contracts for various major projects throughout the Town 

Establishing safety programs for all Town and School employees 

Created and continuously update the Workers Compensation packet of procedures and 

applicable forms by Elaine Shola who personally explained the contents of the packet to 

each School and Department 

Introduction of various programs to the advantage of the Town and School employees 

Continued to monitor all Police and Fire medical bills to insure proper payment 



COLLECTOR/TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer Division is responsible for the collection, disbursement and 
investment of all town monies. Some of the highlights for 1996 are as follows: 

* Improved billing and automated cash receipts for 
water and sewer bills 

* Completed testing and training on in house excise 
tax system 



Borrowed 15 million dollars at a rate of 4.945% 
Andover's bond rating increased to Aal 



INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems (formerly Data Processing) Division is responsible for the 
maintenance, modification and development of all computer applications resident in the central 
Digital computer system. During 1996, this division has increased its responsibilities to include 
servicing the many PC's located throughout town government. 1996 highlights include: 

* Updated water/sewer billings and collections application 
to accept electronic payments through the lockbox system 
(allows 80% of payments to be electronically processed). 

* Increased staff by adding a PC/Networking position and have 
started to provide assistance in PC purchases and troubleshooting; 
planning phase for town-wide local area network. 



VETERANS SERVICES 

Thirteen families were assisted with funds to help pay for fuel, food, medical and personal 
needs. The Town is reimbursed for 75% of these expenditures by the State according to 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 115. 

Ten veterans were admitted to Veterans Administration hospitals. Forty-three veterans 
died in 1996 - thirty-two from World War II, four from the Korean War and seven from the 
Vietnam War. 



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Top Ten Taxpayers - Fiscal 1997 





Property 


Total Taxable 


Total Taxable 


Total 


Taxpayer Name 


Type 


Real Property 


Personal Property 


Tax Assessed 


Andover Mills Realty LP 


Commercial 


$59,475,000 




$1,339,744.47 


Raytheon 


Industrial 


$49,107,100 




$1,106,565.53 


Hewlett-Packard Co. 


Industrial 


$41,160,600 




$ 928,994.74 


Genetics Institute, Inc. 


Industrial 


$22,570,100 




$ 590,407.16 


Gillette Co. 


Industrial 


$23,466,900 




$ 529,647.93 


Digital Equipment Corp. 


Industrial 


$22,126,645 




$ 499,398.38 


CA Investment Trust 


Res/Com 


$26,159,700 




$ 478,967.13 


New England Tel. & Tel. 


Utility 


$ 6,417,900 


$13,472,200 


$ 448,919.56 


Massachusetts Electric Co. 


Utility 


$ 1,453,200 


$17,611,190 


$ 424,083.07 


Interstone/CGL Partners (Marriott) 


Commercial 


$16,045,100 


$ 1,075,510 


$ 386,412.17 




Subtotal 


$267,982,245 


$32,158,900 


$6,733,140.14 



Real & Personal 

Total Value $300,141,145 



Five Additional Top Taxpayers • 

RWF, Inc. 

Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance 
Connecticut General Life Ins. Co. 
Lincoln Andover LLC 
Trustees of Phillips Acameny 



Fiscal 1997 










Industrial 


$12,989,200 






$ 293,166.24 


Office 


$12,327,600 


$ 


490,000 


$ 287,975.91 


Commercial 


$12,480,000 






$ 278,001.69 


Industrial 


$11,047,500 






$ 249,342.09 


Residential 


$13,826,100 






$ 222,981.30 


Subtotal 


$62,670,400 


$ 


490,000 


$1,331,467.23 



Real & Personal 

Total Value S63,160,400 



Fifteen Top Real Estate Assessments - Fiscal 1997 



Andover Mills Realty LP 

Hewlett-Packard Co. 

Raytheon 

CA Investment Trust 

Gillette Co. 

Genetics Institute, Inc. 

Digital Equipment Corp. 

David F. BolgerRev. Tr.(Raytheon) 

Interstone/CGL Partners (Marriott) 

Brookside Estates LP 

Trustees of Phillips Academy 

RWF, Inc. 

Connecticut General Life Ins. Co. 

Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance 

Riverview Commons 



Commercial 

Industrial 

Industrial 

Res/Com 

Industrial 

Industrial 

Industrial 

Industrial 

Commercial 

Apartments 

Residential 

Industrial 

Commercial 

Office 

Apartments 

Totals 



$59,475,000 
$41,160,600 
$27,218,700 
$26,159,700 
$23,466,900 
$22,570,100 
$22,126,645 
$21,888,400 
$16,045,100 
$14,057,800 
$13,826,100 
$12,989,200 
$12,480,000 
$12,327,600 
$11,789,500 

$337,581,345 



$1,339,744.47 
$ 928,994.74 
612,961.24 
478,967.13 
529,647.93 
590,407.16 
499,398.38 
493,604.29 
362,137.91 
217,614.74 
222,981.30 
293,166.24 
278,001.69 
276,916.61 
182,501.46 



$7,307,045.29 



11 



FINANCE AND BUDGET 
ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT 



1993 



1994 



1995 



1996 



Billing Statistics 
Real Estate tax accounts 
Real Estate tax bills 
Personal Property tax accounts 
Personal Property tax bills 
Motor Vehicle Excise bills 

Water accounts 
Sewer accounts 

Other Statistics 
Municipal Lien certificates processed 
W-2s issued- Town 
W— 2s issued— School 
Parking tickets processed 

Purchase Orders processed— Town 
Purchase Orders processed— School 
Other Payments processed-Town 

Fin Com Annual Town Meeting Reports mailei 
Fin Com Special Town Meeting Reports mailec 

Cable TV subscribers 
Town FTE employees 
Number of Retirees 



10,486 


10,706 


10,735 


41,944 


42,824 


42,940 


388 


353 


341 


1,552 


1,412 


1354 


28,727 


30,623 


29714* 




* 


not final 


9,481 


9,618 


9,806 


4,622 


4,651 


4,715 


3,234 


2,655 


1,066 


626 


698 


653 


823 


868 


925 


11,123 


12,049 


10,349 


1,719 


1,851 


2,016 


2,530 


2,721 


3,067 


4,398 


4,599 


5,080 


10,827 


10,907 


11,060 


10,895 


11,011 


11,110 


7,571 


7,858 


8,434 


304.6 


309.9 


315 


296 


296 


305 



12 



TAX RATE RECAPITULATION 


BUDGET 
FY1994 


BUDGET 
FY1995 


BUDGET 
FY1996 


BUDGET 
FY1997 


EXPENDITURES 

Appropriations & Articles 


58,128,449 


62,335,008 


66,410,333 


71,609,767 


Other Local Expenditures: 
Tax Title Purposes 
Final Court Judgements 
Overlay/ Other Deficits 
Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 

Total Local Expenditures 


38,900 



537,845 

38,830 
615,575 


20,000 



653,461 

70,350 
743,811 


40,000 
40,492 

543,401 
66,663 

690,556 


40,000 

115,000 

1,135,896 

68,758 

1,359,654 


State and County Charges 
Overlay Reserve for Abatements 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 
EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE 


1,096,583 
798,198 


1,093,634 
721,215 


1,059,262 
735,201 


999,101 
819,112 


60.638.805 


64.893.668 


68.895.352 


74.787.634 










Estimated Receipts from State: 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 

Total from State 


3,771,132 

23,256 

3,794,388 


4,068,046 

27,557 

4,095,603 


4,651,052 

63,099 

4,714,151 


5,713,130 

39,631 

5,752,761 


Estimated Local Receipts: 

Local Estimated Receipts 

Offset Receipts 

Enterprise Funds 

Revolving Funds 
Total Local Receipts 


11,226,500 
652,979 

11,879,479 


11,520,500 
570,220 

12,090,720 


4,733,000 
634,163 

7,357,947 

345,000 

13,070,110 


5,032,000 
699,000 

7,653,620 

400,000 

13,784,620 


Free Cash and Other Revenue: 
Free Cash - Articles 
Other Available Funds 
Revenue Sharing 

Total Other Appropriations 


179,983 
309,506 

489,489 


54,300 
397,909 

452,209 


180,000 
346,683 

526,683 


715,834 
369,133 

1,084,967 


Free Cash - Operating Budget 


200,000 


300,000 


300,000 


1,500,000 


Total Estimated Receipts 


16,363,356 


16,938,532 


18,610,944 


22,122,348 


Total Property Taxes 

TOTAL REVENUES 


44,275,449 


47,955,136 


50,284,408 


52,665,286 


j 60.638,805 


64,893.668 


68,895,352 


74,787,634 



VALUATION AND TAX RATE SUMMARY 



TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 
RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 
COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 
EQUALIZED TAX RATE 


FY1994 


FY1995 


FY1996 


FY1997 


2,624,173 
15.14 
22.78 
16.87 


2,676,333 
16.06 
24.19 
17.92 


2,777,252 
16.41 
23.99 
18.11 


3,091,930 
15.48 
22.57 
17.03 



13 



WATER AND SEWER ANNUAL REPORT 
DEBT SERVICE FY 1996 

SEWER 
ART 19, 1973 WEST ANDOVER 
ART 21, 1984 PUMPING STATION 

and 
ART 26, 1985 LOWELL STREET (Advance Refunding) 
ART 21, 1984 PUMPING STATION 

and 
ART 26, 1985 LOWELL STREET (Advance Refunding) 
ART 38, 1987 STORM DRAINS 
ART 18, 1985 SANITARY SEWER 

ART 28, 1989 SANITARY SEWER(Advance Refunding) 
ART 28, 1989 SANITARY SEWER ( Advance Refunding) 
ART 32, 1989 STORM DRAINS 
ART 33, 1989 NORTH STREET 
ART 41, 1991 NORTH STREET 
ART 43, 1991 STORM DRAINS 

TOTAL 



PRINCIPAL 

115,000.00 

210,000.00 



25,000.00 
34,000.00 
60,350.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 

25,000.00 

15,000.00 



INTEREST 



3,705.00 



21,105.00 



99,820.00 

5,631.25 

9,826.00 

20,483.69 

16,973.00 

4,465.00 

685.00 

11,290.00 

14,972.50 



494,350.00 



208,956.44 



WATER 

ART 8, 1976 WATER RESERVIOR 

ART 52, 1983 WATER BONDS 

ART 37, 1987 WATER MAINS 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT ( Advance Refunding) 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT ( Advance Refunding) 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT 

ART 37, 1987 WATER MAINS 

ART 46, 1992 WATER MAINS 

ART 53, 1992 PUMPING STATION 

ART 31, 1989 ENGINEERING SPECS 

ART 46, 1992 WATER MAINS 

ART 53, 1992 BANCROFT PUMPING STATION 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT (Advance Refunding) 

ART 15,16, 1985 MAINS & STATION 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT ( Advance Refunding) 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT ( Advance Refunding) 

ART 37, 1987 WATER MAINS 

ART 46, 1992 WATER MAINS 

ART 53, 1994 WATER MAINS 

ART 32, 1995 WATER PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 33, 1995 WATER MAINS 

ART 31, 1995 FISH BROOK IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 46, 1996 WATER MAINS 

ART 46, 1993 PUMPING STATION REPAIR 



45,000.00 

100,000.00 

20,000.00 

155,000.00 

232,500.00 

54,250.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

55,000.00 

40,000.00 

165,000.00 

40,000.00 

65,000.00 

285,000.00 



55,000.00 
16,000.00 
40,000.00 



1,035.00 
20,625.00 

4,505.00 
34,913.75 
67,192.50 
18,422.39 

2,075.00 
14,950.00 
69,135.00 
20,642.50 

7,260.00 
14,385.00 
16,940.00 
111,355.00 
28,642.50 
89,111.00 
23,401.00 
53,080.50 
17,635.26 
10,300.00 
12,312.50 
27,541.25 

9,337.50 

4,966.25 

3,735.00 



1,387,750.00 



683,498.90 



14 



WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE ANNUAL REPORT 



FY96 
SEWER 



FY96 
WATER 



REVENUES 






Rate Collections 


2,076,239 


5,409,616 


Water Service Lines 




66,983 


Water Connection Fee 




76,448 


Water Testing Fees 




6,795 


Meter Installation Fee 




6,800 


Liens Added To Taxes 


48,694 


97,011 


Betterment Assessments 


55,841 


6,147 


Committed Interest 


26,986 




State/Federal Assistance 

TOTAL REVENUES 

EXPENDITURES 






2,207,760 


5,669,800 






Direct Costs: 




' 


Personal services 


164,888 


900,397 


Ordinary Maint. 


70,682 


1,445,505 


Sewer Assessment 
TOTAL DIRECT COSTS 


1,075,594 





1,311,164 


2,345,902 


Indirect Costs: 






Vehicle Maint. 


20,987 


50,776 


DPW Admin. 


13,546 


64,343 


Gen Admin, and Fin. 


30,950 


147,011 


Maint . Admin 


4,442 


11,104 


Motor Vehicle Ins. 


3,107 


10,518 


Comprehensive/Liability Ins. 


7,427 


47,572 


Workmen's Comp. 


6,336 


24,786 


Retirement 


51,394 


199,879 


Health Ins. 


15,922 


61,687 


Engineering 
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS 


31,881 


52,017 


185,992 


669,693 


Debt Service: 






Loan Interest 


208,956 


683,499 


Loan Principal 


494,350 


1,387,750 


BAN Interest/Issue expense 
TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 
SURPLUS/ ( DEFICIT ) 





10,624 


703,306 


2,081,873 


2,200,462 


5,097,468 


7,298 


572,332 



15 



TOWN COUNSEL 

During 1996, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. 
Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town 
Counsel. 

In 1996 land use and real estate matters also required a great deal of attention. A Land 
Court proceeding resulted in a major decision upholding the Zoning Board of Appeals' 
interpretation of the Town zoning by-laws relating to the denial of a special permit for 
development of condominiums on Poor Street. 

Numerous matters were generated by the Planning Board including issues relating to the 
adoption of an adult use zoning by-law. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on 
almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town 
Meetings. During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and 
numerous deeds, easements, releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. 

Special legislation authorized by Town Meeting for a change to the Town Charter to 
allow the appointment of a School Committee member and a representative of the Superintendent 
of Schools to a School Building Committee was drafted and submitted to the Legislature. 



16 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

The mission of the Department of Municipal Maintenance is to provide a safe, comfortable 
and pleasant environment for learning, working and living in the Town by the maintenance of all 
Town and School property/buildings, electro-mechanical systems, street lighting, traffic lights, 
grounds and vehicles. 

The Department of Municipal Maintenance provides services to all departments requesting 
repairs and/or renovations to their facilities, grounds or vehicles. The department also provides 
services to the general public for street lighting, traffic lights, rubbish pickup, athletic fields, fencing, 
leaf composting, tree work and custodial services. The department is charged with keeping Andover 
facilities, vehicles and grounds in good condition and to improve the facilities through an on-going 
capital improvement program. The Department of Municipal Maintenance also manages the Town 
Fuel Depot and the Spring Grove Cemetery where it is actively clearing and grading additional areas 
for burials. 

• The department is required to keep abreast of required Federal, State and local environmental, 
health and safety regulations including: The American Disabilities Act, Asbestos Control, lead paint, 
hazardous waste disposal, radon control, pesticide application and underground fuel tanks. 

The Department is headed by a Facilities Director who is supported by three Superintendents, 
a Vehicle Maintenance Foreman, a Facilities Coordinator, a three-person office staff, part-time 
switchboard operators and a diverse group of skilled and unskilled maintenance trades, grounds and 
tree workers, custodians and vehicle mechanics. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND ELECTRICAL MECHANICAL DIVISIONS 

These two divisions are supervised by two superintendents and provide all maintenance 
services including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, carpentry, painting, and security to all Town and 
School buildings, which total in excess of a million square feet. Additionally they provide custodial 
services to Town buildings, maintain traffic signals and exterior Town-owned light poles. 

During 1996 these two divisions completed 2921 work orders: 





School 


Town 


Number of work 

orders 

completed 


1813 


1108 



17 



1996 Accomplishments 

West Elementary School 

Replaced two sets of outside doors 

Installed window walls in the first grade wing 

Replaced counters and sinks in fifth grade wing and teachers room 

Refinished cabinets in fifth grade wing 

Installed new fire alarm system 

Installed eight new univents in the first grade classroom wing 

Replaced carpeting in Pod A 

West Middle School 

Removed asbestos floor tiles in eight classrooms 
Installed new floor tiles in eight classrooms 
Installed a new roof in the gymnasium and library 
Refinished 17 doors and replaced five in the classroom area 
Constructed wall in the special needs room 
Replaced all air conditioning units in the main office 
Replaced all windows in the main classroom building 
Installed new sink and counter in the new science labs 
Installed additional electric outlets in new science labs 

Shawsheen School 

Installed eight new classroom windows 
Installed new lighting and ceiling in the kitchen 
Installed new stainless steel sink 

Bancroft School 

Installed new central air conditioning system 

Installed new 8,000 gallon above ground oil tank 

Repaired the art room floor 

Constructed retaining wall around the new mechanical systems 

Doherty Middle School 

Installed new sink and counter in new science labs 
Installed additional electric outlets in new science labs 
Installed new domestic hot water system 
Installed new lighting and ceiling in Room 222 
Replaced and added lockers in the team room 
Installed new carpeting in main office and auditorium 
Installed new rubber floor in the gymnasium 



18 



1996 Accomplishments (Continued) 

School Administration Offices 

Replaced carpeting on the second floor 
Old Town Hall 

Constructed a vault in the old safe for the anniversary time capsule 

Installed new convection oven in the kitchen 
Public Safety Center 

Replaced windows throughout the building 
Senior Citizen Center 

Installed new handicap accessible sliding doors at main entrance 
Memorial Hall Library 

Replaced ventilation system 

Installed hold open devices on doors at the rear of the library for handicapped accessibility 
Town Yard 

Environmental site investigation conducted at Town 



PARKS AND GROUNDS DIVISION 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They all operate under the supervision of one superintendent. They 
share certain pieces of equipment and work together on special projects. As with any public agency 
with manpower, special equipment, and vehicles in its inventory, the three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties such as delivering surplus 
government food to the Senior Center, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole maintenance, 
fence/gat^ackstop repairs, drainage connections, ice control, snow removal, and moving 
extraordinarily heavy objects such as the whiskey barrels used as planters in the downtown area. 

PARKS 

This division maintains 2.75 million square feet of ballfields and 1.4 million square feet of lawn 
areas. Ballfields are located on all school grounds and other areas such as Recreation Park, 
Ballardvale Playground, upper Shawsheen, lower Shawsheen, the Bowling Green, and the 
Deyermond Field. Lawn areas include the grounds of all Town and School buildings, parks, 
playgrounds, and designated islands, triangles, and other parcels throughout the Town. Ballfields are 
prepared (groomed and lined) for all secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of 
mowing, aerating, watering, overseeding, liming, fertilizing and controlling weeds and insects. 
Pesticide operations are conducted by trained and licensed personnel using approved pesticides and 
methods. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs and shrub beds on Town property and cuts 
back brush encroaching upon ballfields and recreation areas. 



19 



CEMETERY 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town of Andover. 
The cemetery contains approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 1996, 
there were 90 burials and 197 grave sites were sold. $101,030 in fees were collected - $54,390 was 
turned over to the Town Treasurer and $46,640 was added to the principal of the Perpetual Care 
Fund. Cemetery operations and maintenance includes burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning 
of shrubs and small trees, leaf pickup, snow removal, care of its own facilities and equipment, and 
other tasks such as trash in Recreation Park, and drainage and construction work at other Town 
facilities. 

A three-year comparison of burials, sales, and fees collected is as follows: 





1994 


1995 


1996 


Burials 


84 


91 


90 


Grave Sites Sold 


93 


105 


197 


Total Fee's Collected 


$63,825 


$73,370 


$101,030 



FORESTRY 

Forestry is responsible for the maintenance of trees along the roadside, on school property, 
and other Town-owned land. During 1996, 130 dead and dying large trees were removed. The 
Forestry Division planted 41 shade trees along the roadside. Tree varieties planted were: Callery 
Pear, London Planetree, Green Ash, and Armstrong Red Maple. Approximately 25% of the 
personnel's time was spent on pruning trees, storm repairs, flatclearing areas of undesirable 
vegetation, and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved visibility. The 
Forestry Division also mowed tall weeds along the Town-wide roadsides throughout the Town. 

A three-year comparison of removals and planting is as follows: 





1994 


1995 


1996 


Trees Removed 


111 


103 


130 


Trees Planted 


63 


42 


41 



20 



VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a working foreman and provides 
maintenance to all Town vehicles and major pieces of equipment including: fire apparatus, police 
cruisers, DPW trucks and equipment, Municipal Maintenance trucks and equipment and other support 
vehicles. 

During 1996 the vehicle maintenance completed 1 195 work orders. 





Vehicle Maintenance 


Total Work Orders 
Completed 


1195 



Fuel consumption statistics; Town owned Fuel Depot (U.S. Gallons). 







1994 


1995 


1996 


Police Dept 


Gasoline 


35,917 


34,360 


34,134 


Fire Dept 


Gasoline 


3,762 


4,249 


3,985 




Diesel 


5,987 


7,529 


8,631 


DPW 


Gasoline 


14,475 


11,468 


13,140 j 




Diesel 


13,978 


13,450 


20,500 


DMM 


Gasoline 


19,233 


18,773 


18,690 




Diesel 


3,041 


3,675 


5,156 


Collaborative 


Diesel 


6,288 


7,436 


6,709 


Council Aging 


Gasoline 


583 


614 


658 


Library 


Gasoline 


2,012 


2,243 


2,264 


Town Admin. 


Gasoline 


405 


437 


426 



21 



MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 



This division of the Department of Municipal Maintenance is responsible for scheduling and 
renting school facilities during after-school hours, as well as scheduling and renting School and Town 
athletic fields, Recreation Park and the Old Town Hall function room at the Town House on Main 
Street. 



Municipal Buildings FY 96 




(34 0%) Andovef Town House 



(53 ^%) Schools 



Dmi not Include monle* col I eel fd or paid out f or custodial OT dur tngr entel event f 
Alio doe, not Include 15 FT aalarvtor ofllcettaf f . 



SCHOOLS 

The overall number of school rentals and uses during FY-96 was 4,677 which was down 
6.75% from FY-95. A major factor contributing to the slight decline was the on-going construction 
and renovation at the High School, Sanborn and South Elementary Schools, which resulted in the 
schools being unavailable for after-school use during part of FY-96. Overall, gymnasium space 
continued comprise the majority of the rental and scheduling contracts, with use of the auditoriums, 
cafeterias and other spaces making up the remainder of the scheduled uses. 



Fy 1996 
Permits Issued: 


4,677 


Dept. of Community 

Services: 


35.1% 


Private Rentals 


25.6% 


School Events 


19.1% 


Youth Leagues: 


11.2% 


Scout Troops: 


8.9 % 



School Building Use 
FY 96 



(35.1%) DCS 



1 .2%) Youth Leagues 

(8.9%) Scout Troops 




(19.1%) School 



(25.6%) Private Renters 



22 



FIELDS 

School and Town playing fields continued to be rented to capacity in FY-96. Some of the 
elementary school fields that were unavailable during the previous year due to school renovations 
were back on line in FY-96 which assisted in accomodating the expanding youth athletic leagues in 
Town. Overall use was up 9% from 2,121 uses in FY-95 to 2,315 uses in FY-96. Youth athletic 
leagues such as Little League, Andover Soccer Association, Junior Football and Girls Softball 
continued to comprise the majority of field rentals with scheduling for Department of Community 
Service programs, adult leagues and private rentals making up the remainder. 



1995 Permits Issued: 

Youth Leagues: 

Dept. of Community Services 

Private Rentals/ 
Adult Leagues: 



2,315 

86.9% 
9.5 % 

3.6 % 













Field Uses FY 


96 


j 






(86.9%) Youth Leagues / ' '* , ""° * 

/ ■■■' :> , •, ' 








[ ■ ->> : :yX.'::- 




1 v;-:-:':^^^B^B 


QB (3.6%) Private/Adult 


\ x '\. 




\ * X. 




\^x'|tp:;;^t:£- v J> 


/ (9 5%) DCS 



REC PARK 

Recreation Park is available for private rentals on weekends from May to October. During 
weekdays and evenings the park's softball field and tennis courts are reserved for DCS tennis classes 
and recreational programs and leagues. Private rentals were down from 32 in 1995 to 30 in 1996 
which was still lower than in previous years. The major factor remained that the park's ballfield was 
reserved for adult and youth athletic leagues during the time that the high school and middle school 
ballfields remained offline due to renovations. The greatest number of scheduled uses were for DCS- 
sponsored adult softball leagues with the remainder divided equally between private rentals and 
rentals for the Little League baseball program. 



1995 Rentals/Uses: 166 

Dep. of Community Services: 1 09 

Youth Leagues: 27 

Privates Renters: 30 



Recreation Park 
FY 96 



(65.7%) DCS Programs 




(16 3%) Youth Leagues 



(18 1%) Private 



23 



OLD TOWN HALL 



The function hall at the Andover Town House has been available to rent by Town/School 
groups, residents and non-residents for special events since February 1990. The total number of 
rentals in 1996 was up 8% from 1995. 



1996 Rentals: 83 



Residents: 



48.2 % 



School/Municipal: 42.2 % 



Non-Residents: 9.6 % 





Town House Function Room 






FY 1996 






(48.2%) Residents 




(■■ ;■„■■■■■■■ : - : - :v :;, ■■-•■ \ 

(9 6%) Non-residents \^g$M JSSa 


(42.2%) School/Municpal 



24 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The mission of the Building Division is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the Town 's 
residents and visitors through the enforcement of the State and local laws, bylaws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of the State Building Code 780 CMR 
of the Acts of 1972, and Chapter 40 A The Zoning Act, Massachusetts General Laws and all other 
applicable laws and regulations including applicable Sections of the Andover Code (Demolition 
Bylaw, The Ballardvale Historic District Bylaw, and the Chimney Cap Bylaw). The Building Division 
issues permits for all types of construction including, but not limited to, school buildings (both public 
and private), institutional buildings (nursing homes, nursery schools), business, commercial and 
industrial buildings, dormitories, multi-family as well as single family dwelling, pools, chimneys, signs 
and additions and alterations to all structures. The Building Officials also perform periodic 
inspections for those buildings which are required to obtain Certificates of Inspection under State 
Building Code, Section 108. 

In addition to scheduled inspections and meetings with internal and external customers, the 
Building Division was represented at two State Building Code Appeals Board Hearings, forty-two 
Interdepartmental Reviews, and held fifty-one Plan Reviews. 



TYPE OF PERMITS 

Single Family Dwellings 
(including foundations) 

New Commercial Construction 

Additions and Alterations 
to All Types of Buildings 

Public Buildings/Schools 

Pools, Chimneys, Raze, Signs, etc. 

Certificates of Inspection 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Zoning Verifications 

TOTAL 

* Includes water connection fees 



NO. OF PERMITS 


ESTIMATED VALUES 


FEES 


95 


$19,056,860 


$199,115* 


4 


24,581,000 


161,889 


807 


28,532,193 


179,376 


24 


2,452,010 


19,214 


154 


499,879 


7,462 


109 


... 


6,130 


35 





2,360 
146 


1228 


$75,121,942 


$575,692* 



25 



u 



en 



INSPECTIONS 
PERFORMED 


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28 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding of persons 
and property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is responsible 
for receiving and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis, inspecting all 
residential, commercial and industrial jobs, approving electrical plans for new buildings, assisting the 
Fire Department in inspections of fires due to faulty electrical devices and seeing that permits are 
issued for repairs due to fire damage. 

Enforcement of fire alarm regulations for new homes, conducting and certifying inspections 
of schools, public buildings, day care centers and nursing homes in conjunction with the building 
officials are part of the duties of the Electrical Inspector. Numerous electrical violations were 
investigated with the cooperation of Massachusetts Electric Company and corrected without incident. 

ELECTRICAL PERMITS/FEES COLLECTED 1,118 $76,975.25 



PLUMBING AND GAS FITTING 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the Board 
of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, plumbing 
and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conducted as necessary to ensure compliance with 
State Codes. A Final Inspection is conducted for the purpose of the issuance of a Certificate of 
Occupancy. Complaints and violations are also investigated, corrected or reported to the proper 
authorities. 



PLUMBING PERMITS/FEES COLLECTED 648 $32, 1 8 1 

GAS FITTING PERMITS/FEES COLLECTED 544 $13.810 

TOTAL PERMITS & FEES 1,182 $45,99 1 



29 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 

The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover's natural resources and 
to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town's conservation land. 

During 1996, the Conservation Commission issued approximately 60% more permits under 
the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act than the preceding year. An advertised Public Hearing 
is conducted for each permit issued as required by law. These projects include commercial/industrial, 
residential subdivision, single lot development, municipal and State projects. 

The Conservation Commission maintains the on-going delineation of wetland resources 
depicted on the one hundred eighty-three Andover Wetland Maps which are directly referenced in 
various Town By-Laws and regulations, including the Zoning By-Law, the Watershed Protection 
Overlay District, and Rules and Regulations for Use of Subsurface Sewage Disposal Systems. 

Approximately sixteen hundred acres of Town-owned land are under the control and custody 
of the Conservation Commission. The Commission prepares and periodically revises Andover's Open 
Space and Outdoor Recreation Plan. The Commission administers a number of statutory 
Conservation Restrictions and Conservation Easements over privately owned property. 

The Conservation staff attends interdepartmental reviews of major projects, and otherwise 
interacts with the other Town land-use regulatory agencies, including the Zoning Board of Appeals, 
Planning Board, Building Officials and Board of Health, and their respective staff, and provides 
technical and administrative support to the seven-member, volunteer Commission. 

The Conservation Commission purchased 3.0 acres of land at 88-100 High Street for 
conservation purposes. 

1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 



Conservation Commission Meetings 


24 


24 


22 


23 


23 


Public Hearings & Public Meetings 


185 


147 


164 


182 


270 


Orders of Condition Issued 


20 


25 


21 


14 


33 


Amended Orders of Condition Issued 


9 


22 


9 


9 


11 


Certificates of Compliance Issued 


59 


54 


50 


36 


40 


Determinations of Applicability Issued 


102 


60 


62 


81 


123 


Notification of Satisfactory Completion of Work 










11 


Findings of Significance Issued 


22 


31 


23 


30 


28 


Enforcement Orders Issued 


14 


11 


14 


11 


7 


Emergency Certifications Issued 


4 





3 


7 


2 


Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 


36.2 


1 


10.65 


10.62 


3.0 


Conservation Restrictions Established 











1 





Wetland Filing Fees Collected 


$5,552 


$9,805 


$6,922 


$8,800 


$11,090 


Professional Staff 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Expenditures from Conservation Fund 












(by Fiscal Year) 


$922 


$500 


$264,701 


$92,005 


$86,000 



29A 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division encompasses all phases of health administration, including planning, 
evaluation, budgeting, enforcement, inspection and pseudo adjudicatory proceedings. The 
Sanitarians supervise the inspection and public health education programs in matters dealing with 
the State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code. The Public Health Nurse is primarily 
responsible for all medical clinical administrative matters. The Director of Public Health assumes 
primary responsibility for coordination among the various boards in permit granting and proper 
land use, specifically in the area of environmental protection issues (i.e. septic system design, 
wetland pollution, water quality protection). The Director designs programs and implements 
policies as proposed by the Andover Board of Health to meet the health needs of the community. 
The Board of Health consists of three volunteer members appointed by the Town Manager for 
staggered three-year terms. 



ACTIVITIES REPORT 





1994 


1995 


1996 


Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Restaurant Inspections 
Complaints & Investigations 
Administrative Hearings 
Court Actions 
Fees Collected 


13 

165 

226 

257 

1 

2 

56,617 

CLINIC REPORT 


14 

152 

211 

208 

3 

5 

$53,765 


12 

267 

160 

193 

2 

3 

$64,017 




1994 


1995 


1996 


Outreach Clinics 
Attendance 


36 
457 


35 
471 


34 
390 


Senior Center Clinics 
Attendance 


49 

761 


49 

814 


48 
720 


Office Visits 
Home Visits 


116 
13 


169 
2 


70 
5 


Influenza Immun. Clinic Attendance 


1088 


1312 


1312 


Pneumonia ImmunizationClinic 


61 


32 


41 



30 



Cholesterol Screening Clinics 
Attendance 

Glucose Screening Clinics 
Attendance 

Mantoux Tuberculin Testing Attendance 
Andover Positive. Reactor Follow-up 
T.B. Clinic Case History & Follow-up 



CLINIC REPORT (CONT.1 

1994 

10 
153 



4 
31 

104 
56 
20 



1995 

10 
164 

2 
9 

265 
45 
31 



1996 

9 
125 

1 
9 

129 
46 
20 



NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



Other Mycobacteria 



2 1* 2 

(* Saprophytic Mycobacteria) 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



Animal Bites 

Bacteremia 

Chicken Pox 

Campylobacter 

E. coli 0157.H7 

Giardia 

Listeriosis 

Lyme Disease 

Salmonella 

Shigella 

Hepatitis B 

Hepatitis C 

Pertussis 

Tuberculosis 

Legionella 

Yersinia Entercolitica 



46 


31 


32 




1 





190 


60 


23 


10 


12 


8 


2 


1 


4 


1 


6 


5 




1 





3 


11 





10 


6 


3 


2 


1 


2 
6 
1 

1 
2 
1 

1 



31 



HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO AWARENESS PROGRAM 

The mission of Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program is to reduce tobacco 
use in Massachusetts by 50% by 1999. 

The Tobacco Awareness Program offers free technical assistance for worksite programs 
limiting smoking. It assists smokers who want to quit and sponsors public education to keep non 
smokers from starting. The staff consists of a Program Director, Health Educator, and part time 
Secretary. It assists in drafting tobacco regulations and conducts compliance check surveys of 
vendors selling tobacco to minors, since 60% of smokers start smoking before the age of 14. The 
following are some of the highlights of Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program 
Activities. 



COMPLIANCE CHECK SUMMARY 





September 

1004 


April 

1QQS 


December 

1QQS 


April 

1006 


January 

1007 


Vendors 
Inspected 


84 


102 


130 


107 


128 


Illegal Sales 


53 


20 


2 


6 


5 


Meeting State 
Compliance 


37% 


80% 


98% 


94% 


96% 



32 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of the 
Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the recommendations 
of the Master Plan. 

1996 saw a marked shift from development activity in the residential areas to major activity 
in the industrial and commercial districts. Only one definitive subdivision plan - Deering Estates - was 
approved during the year, while the Planning Board dealt with several new projects in the River Road 
and Lowell Junction industrial districts. Commercial activity began making a comeback with the 
construction of the Courtyard Retail Center in Shawsheen and the proposed redevelopment of the 
former Tyer Rubber building on Railroad Street for a specialty foods market. 

Major new development in the River Road area in the form of Putnam Investments, 
PictureTel, Eisai, and Boston Technology, and with Genetics Institute in Lowell Junction generated 
increased attention on transportation improvement projects such as the River Road West corridor, 
the new 1-93 overpass, and Burtt Road extension. Our sustained high-quality, well managed growth 
was recognized in 1996 when the Town's bond rating was raised from Aa to Aal. 

At the spring Town Meeting new zoning by-laws were enacted to deal with adult uses and 
more flexibility in industrial design. A special Town Meeting in the fall of 1996 was less successful 
when the Board's proposed elderly housing by-law was defeated and several new regulations to deal 
with environmentally sensitive lands were withdrawn. It is hoped that 1997 will see approval of those 
important new regulations. In late 1996 the Planning Board instituted new fee schedules for 
development applications which have resulted in increased revenues for the Town. 





1994 

23 


1995 

23 


1996 


Planning Board Meetings 


23 


Public Hearings Held 


102 


75 


57 


ZBL Task Force Meetings 


1 


6 


3 


Definitive Subdivision Plans 


10 


6 


4 


Preliminary Subdivision Plans 


8 


4 


19 


ANR Plans 


28 


19 


34 


Site Plan Reviews 


4 


3 


1 


Special Permits issued 


25 


23 


23 


Lot Releases and Clearance Certificates Issued 


62 


76 


78 


Warrant Articles Reported 


25 


35 


40 


Subdivision Guarantees 


$459,349 


$479,529 


$596,882 


Street Acceptances 


5 


12 


7 


Revenues Generated 


$41,149 

33 


$52,079 


$65^67 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40 A and 40B and the Town By-Laws. The Board 
meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall Library, Memorial Hall, Elm Square. 
Five regular members and four associate members are appointed by the Board of Selectmen and serve 
without pay. The public hearings by the Board are the result of applications in the following areas: 

1 • A variance from the requirements of the By-Laws 

| • A special permit under the By-Laws 

• A person aggrieved by the decision of the Building Inspector or other Administrative Official 

1 • Permission to construct low or moderate income housing within the Town of Andover 

I (Comprehensive Permit) 

S Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches requested, legal 

advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The public hearings are 
conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations. 
| Following the hearings, members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each property in 

question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter, open to the public, at which time the Board 
fc discusses the petitions which have been heard. Based on their views and the evidence presented at 

the hearing, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town Clerk. 



NO. OF HEARINGS HELD 12 

NO. OF DELIBERATION MEETINGS HELD 12 

NO. OF PETITIONS FILED 63 

FEES COLLECTED $ 7,975 



34 



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35 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk 's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town 's 
democratic process, to maintain and preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of 
the community and the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality service. 



As the Town of Andover commemorated its 350th Anniversary year of incorporation, we 
also celebrated the democratic ideals upon which this country was founded. During 1996, the 
Town Clerk's office managed four elections and two Town Meetings. It was an exciting year and 
fitting indeed that in our 350th year as a Town we also chose new elected offices at all levels of 
government including the President of the United States. 

DEPARTMENT CHANGES 

As of the end of December, the Town Clerk's Department became fully operational on the 
State Voter Registration Information System (VRIS). The census was printed from the state 
system and the Town will now be connected to every city and town in the Commonwealth for 
voter registration purposes and elections. 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 

In January, the Town Census was mailed to 10,228 households. The population at that 
time was 29,846. 

The year ended with 19,413 registered voters in the Town's eight precincts as follows: 



1 - 2244 


3 - 2309 


5 - 2622 


7 - 2290 


2 - 2466 


4 - 2439 


6 - 2498 


8 - 2545 



In 
January , 



Elections 1996 



Registered Voters 
Voted 



25 
20 

CO 


4 

I 

1 

" 

1 
1 














Thousand 
en o oi 




















Pies. Primary Town Election State Primary State Election 



36 



SUMMARY OF OFFICE TRANSACTIONS] 



1996 




Dog Ucanm 



Ftah/Hjfit Uuitn 



timnanCaiHcUi 



Ucc Flngt 



Nm Vour R.gWuUon 



1994 



1995 



1996 



Births Recorded: 


335 




340 


333 


Marriages Recorded: 


202 




156 


187 


Deaths Recorded: 


230 




241 


258 


Dog Licenses Sold: 


1911 




2037 


2022 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold: 


689 




630 


566 


Business Certificates: 


89 




145 


106 


UCC Filings: 


426 




455 


452 


Registered Voters: 


2153 




2033 


3428 


FEES COLLECTED 




1995 




1996 


Marriage Licenses: 


« 


$ 2,400 


- 


$ 2,850 


Certified Copies: 




9,948 




10,265 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings: 




5,678 




6,258 


Miscellaneous Licenses Income: 




11,645 




12,365 


Liquor Licenses Income: 




98,450 




99,930 


Business Certificate Filings: 




3,615 




2,795 


Miscellaneous Income: 




5,403 




4,654 


Dog Licenses: 




19,099 




16,062 


Non-Criminal Violations: 




1,100 




1,025 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses 




11.454* 




16.013 



** 



TOTAL $168,792 



$172,218 



* $ 1 1 , 1 52. in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Game - $302.45 was retained 

by the Town of Andover. 
** $15,751 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Game - $261.80 was retained 

by the Town of Andover. 



37 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

The mission of the Memorial Hall Library is to make available a broad range of library 
materials, to provide up-to-date and accurate information, to offer services and programs desired 
by the community ofAndover, to act as the most convenient point of access for the needed materials 
and information and to actively seek to make community members and organizations aware of 
library resources and services. 



The celebration of the Town of Andover's 350th Anniversary and the introduction of new 
information-based technologies were the two significant themes of the Library over the past twelve 
months. As an anniversary gift to the Town, Memorial Hall Library's Board of Trustees sponsored 
and work on the production of the videotape, The Life of the Library . While it has served its purpose 
as a gift, The Life of the Library is ultimately a loving tribute about the importance of libraries in the 
lives of all who use them. The creator of the video, Maribeth Edmonds, produced a classic and classy 
story that will be appreciated by library users of all ages for years to come. 

The Library staff and Friends of Memorial Hall Library are all to be congratulated for their 
commitment and creativity in carrying out an unprecedented display of monthly exhibits and programs 
celebrating Andover's past and future. Each month a committee of library staff planned and carried 
out an exhibit about an era in America's history along with a related program. From the January 
Victorian Tea and February Lincoln Symposium, both sponsored by the Friends, to the Float in 
September's parade, the Library staff worked in collaboration with many Andover groups and 
individuals to make 1996 a very special year. Among the groups contributing to these efforts were 
the Friends of the Library, the Andover Historical Society, the North Andover Historical Society, the 
Arts Lottery Council, Phillips Academy, the Department of Community Development and Planning, 
the other Town Government offices, the Municipal Maintenance Department, the Schools and the 
Fire and Police Departments. Our heartfelt thanks go to these groups and to all others who helped. 

The Library made significant strides toward making Memorial Hall Library the information 
place for the present and future with the introduction of access to the Internet and the start-up of a 
PC work center. Library users have responded enthusiastically to these new services. The Internet 
work stations are in near constant use by explorers of the Web and the PC work center is used daily 
by job seekers writing resumes, students writing reports, and others needing a high quality written 
product. The Library is deeply appreciative to Andover resident Matt Russell for his expertise in 
setting up the Local Area Network (LAN) which allows us to have multiple access points for the 
Internet. The Library also appreciates Mart's help in formulating a vision for how the Internet can 
be used in the public library. The Library also thanks former Andover resident, Laura Russell, who 
contributed her expertise in creating the Library's home page which can be found at 
WWW.MHL.ORG. 



38 



The key to the Library's continued future successes will be an expanding vision of how 
electronic services, such as the Internet, can provide information along with a commitment to train 
ourselves in using these services to help the public. The Library will also be working with other 
libraries in northeast Massachusetts in making the transition to the new regional structure. This 
change will result in increased regional services for all types of libraries while redefining Andover's 
role in providing some of those services. Without question, the year 1997 will be one of great 
change. 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF LIBRARY USAGE IN 1996 



Hardcover Book Purchases 



















1 


r Y92 


FY93 


FY94 


FY95 


FY96 


Reference 808 


759 


974 


751 


691 


Non-Fiction 3,456 


3,238 


4,344 


4,702 


4,091 


Fiction 1,316 


1,246 


1,448 


1,694 


1,631 


Other 426 


389 


439 


356 


266 


Total Hardcover Book Purchases 6,006 


5,632 


7,205 


7,503 


6,679 










i 




Hardcover Books 






i 

8 


Purchased 








i 








i 




l 
i 

i 




to 6 - 






i 
i 


m Reference 






i 




2 1 














gb Non-Fiction 










q_ H> 4 - 






1 












■■ Fiction 










t- o 

-9 h 1 


I 
















. 




(zzi Other 










E 2 - 


1 
















[ 


iH Total Hardcover Book Purchases 


i 




z mj 












i 




u 

FY92 FY93 FY94 FY95 FY96 








FY92-FY96 






i 





39 



Reference Questions Asked 



1993 
31,850 



1994 
33,598 



1995 
35,448 



1996 
39,122 



Reference Questions Asked 

1993-1996 



<n 
< 

E 

3 



50 
</> 40 
a 30 

10 

o 



20 
10- 




Reference Questions Asked 



1993-1996 



Children's and Adult's Circulation 

Adult Books & Other Print 
Childrens' Books & Other Print 



1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


214,321 


204,720 


194,479 


197,750 


158,588 


167,154 


175,120 


175,204 



Children's and Adult Books 

Circulation 1993-1996 



250 




Adult Books & Other Print 
Childrens' Books & Other Print 



1993-1996 



Non-Print Circulation 

Non-Print Materials Circulated 
Total Circulation 



1993 

60,239 

480,517 



1994 

67,639 

483,428 



1995 

80,273 

490,293 



1996 

84,532 

500,908 



Title 



600 




Non-Print Materials Circulated 
Total Circulation 



X-Axis 



40 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services to identify, develop, implement and advocate 
for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of elders in the 
community, and to provide a focal point in the community where there programs and services can 
be easily accessed by elders and their families. 

CUSTOMERS 

Elders in Andover are like elders everywhere - some are healthy and active, others are frail 
and in need of many services. Most are somewhere in between, needing limited or occasional services 
to maintain independence and dignity. All seek meaningful opportunities to learn, grow, interact and 
volunteer in the community. There are nearly 5,000 Andover residents over 60 years of age, almost 
15% of the Town's total population. There are 3,100 residents in the 50-59 age bracket signaling 
the need for creative planning for the future of Andover' s citizens and the whole community. 

STAFF, VOLUNTEERS AND SERVICES 

The role of the Senior Center staff is to identify and maintain a comprehensive overview of 
all resources available to Andover elders; to encourage and advocate for service and program delivery 
by other agencies such as Home Care, Visiting Nurses, and Family Services of Greater Lawrence; to 
provide services only as necessary to prevent "cracks" in the overall system; and to plan and provide 
services with volunteers and students whenever possible in order to achieve effective and affordable 
services at the least cost possible to Town government and the taxpayers. 

During 1996 the Senior Center staff sought to strengthen the role of the Center in the 
community re-examining it in light of the emerging and often divergent requirements of our aging 
society. The Division consists of eighteen paid, full and part-time staff, supported by destain paid 
professional teachers, eight volunteer lay and professional teachers, one senior aide, thirteen office 
volunteers, two hundred program and service volunteers of all ages from pre-school through college 
and retirement, two School Department Food Service Staff, one Maintenance Department custodial 
staff, and eight Vocational High School interns. This represents, for calender year 1996, the 
equivalent of 31 full-time positions. 

In 1996, volunteers provided 15,519 hours of service to the Senior Center programs and 
services. Based on state valuation guidelines this represents a service valued at approximately 
$217,266. Additionally, Senior Citizen Tax Voucher workers contributed 8,800 hours of service to 
other Town offices such as the Library, School Department, Town Offices and the Police Department 
at a value of $123,200. The total value of volunteer services generated by the Division of Elder 
Services is $354,466 (Figure 6). 

Some of the services and programs available at the Senior Center are included in the 
Comparative Statistical Report (Figure 1). Increases can be seen in most categories such as health 
and wellness programs and services, outreach, information and referral services, social services, 
nutrition, recreation, socialization, education, intergenerational, cultural enrichment and volunteer 
opportunities (Figures 2 - 6). 



41 



GOALS AND ACHIEVEMENTS OF 1996 

The staff worked this past year to achieve the goals and objectives outlined in its first planning 
and retreat in late 1995 and to set new goals for 1997. Some of the goals achieved were: 

• Review and clarify the Mission and Vision of the Division; 

• Improve the use and status of the current space; 

• Develop senior citizen leadership in Center programs and activities; 

• Implement the Friendly Visitor Program and implement improvements to several other 
services. 

The staff is proud of these achievements and of the development of new resources. For 
example, the Vocational High School Clinical/Field placement program was initiated in which nurses 
aide and activities assistant candidates are placed in the Center and Adult Day Program each semester 
for course credit and "hands-on experience". Three new Senior leadership committees were formed 
to plan and conduct special programs: the Computer Committee, the Men's Program Committee and 
the Cultural Committee. The Pen Pal Program with Sanborn Elementary School, the Back Porch 
Dance Company, monthly art exhibits, massage therapy and a host of special activities and 
educational programs filled the year with learning and enjoyment. 

GOALS AND CHALLENGES FOR 1997 

The Elder Services/Senior Center Division must take the lead in developing a new vision and 
new policies for the delivery of services combining creativity and innovation with the latest advances 
in research on aging. It must do this within the context of federal and state policies on aging and the 
changing needs of Andover's elders. 

The staff must devise creative strategies for resource development to implement the vision. 
In 1997 and the future, major portions of the work of the Senior Center will increasingly be 
accomplished with a budget comprised significantly of fees for service, volunteer and student services 
and the fundraising efforts of the Friends of the Andover Senior Center. 

The following special goals for 1997 have been identified: 

• Develop and implement an intake and recordkeeping system to accurately and 
comprehensively reflect, track and report services, income and expenditures; 

• Contract with a local university graduate school of management student volunteer program 
to assist with the design and implementation of a new services delivery and management 
model for the new Senior Center; 

• Conduct a major volunteer recruitment campaign for current and future needs; 



42 



• Study transportation needs of elders and develop recommendations for Town Meeting; 

• Conduct a self-assessment study using the National Council on Aging Senior Center 
Standards. 

SUMMARY: THE FUTURE AND THE NEW SENIOR CENTER 

While aging is a normal part of the development process, we continue to be challenged to find 
new and better ways to meet the special needs which aging brings. With the dramatic increases in 
the demand for services, increasing participation within the Senior Center and the expectation of a 
growing elder population, adequate space is a serious problem. Every avenue has been explored by 
the staff to creatively use and maximize resources and space. The Center has outgrown its current 
location. In order to meet the needs of Andover now and in the future, a new site is needed. 

A Senior Center is the focal point for elders in the community. It is the local piece of a 
national effort to protect and improve the quality of life of the fastest growing segment of our 
population. It is a place for opportunities. While seniors often come to the Center to get a service 
or take a class, more often they come to give. The Center uses paid staff and a large corps of 
volunteers, both young and old, to meet the needs of those who are well, those who are frail, and to 
reach out to those who are undeserved; it provides support for family caregivers and provides 
numerous volunteer opportunities to all members of the community; it raises and manages funds from 
many sources, both public and private. Services are diverse and inclusive, enhance dignity, support 
independence, and encourage continued involvement in the community. Through special programs 
with area public and private schools, ranging from pre-school to vocational to the college level, the 
center develops innovative approaches to aging issues and enriches the life of the community as a 
whole. 

Emphasis in 1997 will be placed on the importance of the Division's cooperation with the 
Council on Aging and the Friends of the Andover Senior Center, Inc. as these groups develop a vision 
and work with the community to build a new Senior Center, one which will bring a sense of pride and 
fulfillment to the whole community. 

The staff envisions the future as one in which the community recognizes that the quality of 
life in Andover depends on the quality of life of all of its citizens. The community supports, in spirit 
and by allocation of its public and private resources, a Senior Center committed to these principles. 




; ^■:, 



DESCRIP TION 

ELDERLY SOCIAL DAY CARE 

Total Participation 
Total Days Used 

INSTRUCTIONAL CLASSES 

Total Classes 



ANNUAL REPORT 1996 

F.Y.19 94 



39 

3.007 



100 



F.Y. 1995 



51 
2.952 



150 



F. Y, 19 96 



40 
3.434 



212 



LECTURES & SEMINARS 

Total Number 
Total Attendance 



25 

630 



30 
900 



36 
810 



NUTRITION 

Meals-on-Wheels Served 
On-site Lunches Served 



11,120 
6,140 



14,680 
9,123 



13,072 
6,009 



SOCIAL & RECREATION 

No Parties 
Supper Club # elders 
Total # Bingo Games 
Total Bingo Attendance 

MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION 

Total Mileage 
Unduplicated Clients 
Duplicated Clients 
Number of Drivers 

FRIENDLY VISITOR PROGF 

Total No Clients 
Total No Visitors 



14 

25 

46 

4,140 



4,900 
58 
28 
18 



13 

25 

45 

3,669 



6,851 

102 

500 

18 



15 

30 

47 

3,272 



7,917 

92 

307 

18 



27 
20 



VOLUNTEER SERVICES 

Total Hours 

Number of Senior Center Vol. 

Value to Senior Center 

TAX VOUCHER PROOF 

# Tax Voucher Volunteers 

# Hours Served 
Value to Town Offices 
Value to Senior Center 

Total Value Tax Vouch. Service 

Value All Volunteer Service 

ELDERLY HEALTH CLINICS 

Blood Pressure (wkly.) 
Flu Shots (2/yr.) 
Pneumonia Shots 

OUTREACH SERVICES 
C.O.A. 

Unduplicated Clients 
Duplicated Clients 
Home Visits 
Hospital Visits 
Office Visits 
S H.I.N.E. 
Other 



Services Provided by Other Agencies 

Elder Servi ces of Merrimack Valley 
Unduplicated Clients 
Proportionate Cost of Services 

Family S ervices of Greater Lawrence 
Total Clients Served 
Unduplicated Clients 
Total Contacts 

Visiting Nurses Association 
Total # Clients 






18,624 

191 

$186,200 









$186,240 



897 

1,088 

61 



124 

149 

90 

67 

93 

100 

178 



282 

$307,169 



144 

54 

446 



14,974 

146 

$179,740 



30 
3,000 

25,000 
5,000 

30,000 

$209,740 



814 

1,312 

32 



280 
425 
87 
60 
116 
147 
444 



245 
$384,792 



97 
28 

450 



15,519 

124 

$217,266 



88 

8,800 

123,200 

14,000 

137,200 

$354,466 



801 

731 

41 



353 
409 

92 

4 

125 

62 
272 



452 

$356,124 



93 

40 

417 



525 



44 



ELDER SERVICES 1996 



Outreach 



TOtal Number of Different Elders Served 



400 
350 
300 
250 
200 
150 
100 
50 






— 




— - 














—^ 


J2B0B 








i 




^J 124 | 




m 

















1994 



1995 
Outreach 



1996 



FIGURE #2 



Nutrition 



Total Number of Different Elders Served 



300 
250 
200 
150 
100 
50 




1 44 M ' 

J — 'Warn 



1994 



1995 



1996 



Meals on Wheels 
Congregate Meals 





Recreation/Education 



Total Number Different Elders Served 



250 
200 
150 
100 
50 





1994 



1995 



1996 



Instructional Classes 
Lectures & Seminars 
Social Events 



FIGURE #3 



New vs. On-Going Cases 

Total Number of Different Elders Served 



300 
250 
200 
150 
100 
50 





1994 1995 1996 

New Cases On-Going Cases 



FIGURE #4 



FIGURE #5 



45 



VOLUNTEERISM AT THE SENIOR CENTER 

Volunteerism is of major significance at the Senior Center. There are two categories of 
volunteers. Senior Center volunteers devote thousands of hours to providing services and programs 
at the Center and in the community ranging from driving elders to medical appointments to teaching 
a class at the Center. In addition, Tax Voucher volunteers provide thousands of hours of skilled 
services to Town Departments such as helping teachers in the classroom, doing clerical work at the 
Police and Fire Station or designing computer programs for the Senior Center. 



1994 



1995 



1996 



VOLUNTEER SERVICES 

Total Hours 

Number of Senior Center Volunteers 
Value to Senior Center 


18,624 

191 

$186,300 


14,974 

146 

$179,740 


15,519 

124 

$217,266 


TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 

Tax Voucher Volunteers 

Hours Served 

Value to Town Offices 

Value to Senior Center 

Total Value Tax Voucher Service 









30 

3,000 

$25,000 

$ 5,000 

$30,000 


88 

8,800 

$123,200 

$ 14,000 

$137,200 



VALUE OF ALL VOLUNTEER SERVICES 



$186,240 $209,740 $354,466 





Vol 


unteer S 


ervices 


25.000 
20,000 
15,000 




Number of Hours 


Served 








^.^^24,318 T 




-^\-^-r:' 


18,624 JH 


■HBHMHBHHj 17,974 f 




... - .... 


10,000 




• 


-• - 


- 


5,000 















- - ■ - 


.._... 






1994 


1995 




1996 






Volunteer I- 


lours 





Volunteer Services 



400,000 - 
350,000 
300,000 - 
250,000 
200,000 
150,000 
100,000 - 
50,000 
- 



$ Value of Services 




1994 1995 1996 

Value of Hours Served 



Figure 6. 



Figure 7. 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of life 
by providing the finest potable water, state of the art disposal of our wastes (water and solids), and 
provide safe travel on our road network. 

ENGINEERING 

The Engineering Division provided field surveys, construction designs, plans and cost 
estimates for various construction projects such as Pilgrim Drive and Pioneer Circle sewer 
construction, Center Street sidewalk and roadway reconstruction, prepared specifications and bids, 
performed field layouts, inspections and construction supervision on other projects such as the 
expansion of the Commuter Park & Ride Lot at Wildwood Road and South Main Street and the 
installation or repair of storm drains at thirteen various locations. 

Staff members also assisted and coordinated with consultants and other Town departments 
on the planning and/or construction of such projects as the improvements at Rec Park, the additions 
at Andover High School, Sunburn and South Elementary Schools, Buret Road Extension and the 
River Road bridge and roadway reconstruction. The Massachusetts Highway Department engineers 
were consulted on State Highway projects such as the Harding Street Bridge reconstruction and the 
Route 28 reconstruction through Phillips Academy. 

Planning and estimating for the reconstruction/resurfacing of sixty (60) Town streets was 
prepared this year, while assistance was given to the Highway Division during the actual work 
performed on thirty-nine (39) of these streets. Preliminary plans and estimates were also prepared 
for the proposed sewer extension to the Ballardvale Road and Sunset Rock Road area. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the Planning 
Board and checked for design conformance, traffic safety, layout and adequacy of proposed roads 
and utilities. Performance bond amounts were also calculated as requested by the Planning Board. 
The construction of all roads and utilities in new subdivisions such as Somerset Village, Andover 
Country Club Lane, Warwick Circle, Salem Streets and Jenkins Road water main extension and other 
sites were inspected and tested to insure compliance with Town standard requirements. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities, 
including many such excavations by Bay State Gas Company and NYNEX contractors were issued 
through this division and the necessary utility markouts and inspections were carried out. 

The Engineering Division updated the Town Assessor's maps and printed the necessary copies 
for other Town Departments. The staff also provided and maintained records of various utilities, 
street excavations, residential, commercial and industrial site developments, street layouts and road 
maintenance. 



47 



1994 1995 1996 



Storm Drain Construction (ft.) 
Water Main Construction (ft.) 
Streets Reconstructed/Resurfaced (miles) 
Street Opening Permits - 

Issued/Inspected 
Sewer Connections reviewed for Board of Health 
Assessor's Maps Updated 
Subdivision Plans reviewed - (# plans/#lots) 
Performance Bonds figured for Planning Board 
Subdivision Construction Inspections - 

Water Mains (ft.) 

Sewer Mains (ft.) 

Drain Lines (ft.) 

Sidewalks 



HIGHWAY 



3,913 


4,112 


4,774 


6,100 


7,053 


681 


6 


19.6 


18.2 


193 


195 


483 


43 


44 


74 


102 


57 


63 


16/168 


13/168 


20/183 


15 


17 


14 


10,780 


10,520 


14,309 


3,310 


6,535 


5,414 


8,860 


5,870 


2,589 


3,970 


4,010 


3,035 



The Highway Division is responsible for the road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing, of two hundred and fifty plus miles of existing roads. During the spring and summer, 
two sweepers are kept busy in continuous cleaning of all streets after winter sanding. Both sweepers 
start each morning at 5:00 A.M. The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division in its 
inspection of the conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway 
Division also provides men and equipment for all other divisions when needed and is responsible for 
the maintenance and replacement of all Town drainage systems, including catch basins, storm drains 
and Town brooks. The Highway Division, with the help and cooperation of all other divisions of the 
Public Works Department and Department of Municipal Maintenance, is also responsible for snow 
removal, ice control and flood control for all Town roads. 

FY/94 FY/95 FY/96 

Streets resurfaced 
Miles of road resurfaced 
Feet of berms constructed 
Catch basins cleaned 
Storm drains cleaned 
Catch basins repaired 
Storm drains repaired 



17 


60 


57 


5.9 


19.6 


18.2 


1,340 


3,780 


4,370 


676 


1,477 


2,500 


10 


13 


10 


72 


71 


27 



48 



SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater 
pumping stations on Dale Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path, Osgood Street, West Elementary School, 
Shawsheen Village, and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system includes 69 miles 
of sanitary sewers and 4,922 connections. The raw sewage discharge from Shawsheen Village 
Pumping Station is collected and transported by means of a force main through the City of Lawrence 
and treated by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's regional wastewater treatment plant. 



FY/94 



FY/95 



FY/96 



Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 


50 


37 


43 


Sewer Main Rodded - Maintenance 


11 


11 


10 


Sewer Mains Repaired 








2 


Sewer Services Cleared 


14 


20 


16 


SOLID WASTE 









Andover, being a member of the North East Solid Waste Committee (NESWC), has its refuse 
transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant in North Andover where the refuse 
is incinerated to generate electricity. The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside 
recycling program for newspapers/magazines, metal containers and glass, and the voluntary drop-off 
program collecting #1, #2 plastics and aluminum materials. The Town also maintains a leaf and grass 
clippings compost site on High Plain Road, near Bald Hill, with the compost material being available 
to Town residents. 

. FY/94 FY/95 FY/96 



Tons of residential refuse collected 

Tons of newspapers/magazines recycled 

Tons of glass recycled 

Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 

Tons of leaves & grass clippings composted 

Tons of #1 & #2 plastics 

Tons of aluminum materials 



10,108 
2.328 



10,507 
2,325 



10,720 
2,157 



745 


372 


458 


36 


12 


7 


1,215 


1,645 


1,337 


26 


32 


37 



GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment Facility continued to provide service 
to residential, commercial and industrial users in 1996. Since its initial operation in April 1977, the 
facility has treated 225 billion gallons of wastewater that was previously discharged, untreated, into 
the Merrimack River. The plant has a staff of 47 people. The operation is continuous 24 hours per 
day, 365 days per year. The District Commission meets monthly to address policy matters. 



49 



FY/94 



FY/95 



FY/96 



Andover's daily average flow to the 
Sanitary District (in millions gallons) 



3.455 



3.232 



3.565 



WATER 

The Water Division consists of 20 full-time employees and one part-time employee is 
responsible for the water supply, treatment, meter reading, billing and distribution of safe drinking 
water to the community. The water system consists of a 24 million gallon per day treatment facility, 
pumping stations and six distribution storage tanks. 

In 1996 the Water Division worked to ensure the quality of drinking water and its compliance 
with all state and federal regulations. The standards for organic contaminants, inorganic chemicals 
and radioactivity are very stringent. We are pleased to report that Andover's supply complies with 
all standards specified by the Safe Drinking Water Act. 

The Water Treatment Plant staff operates and maintains the ozonation facility and treatment 
plant an average often hours per day off-peak and twenty-four hours a day during high demand. 
Other responsibilities include monitoring of the ten million gallon per day Fishbrook Pumping Station, 
Bancroft Station and the Shawsheen wastewater collection/pumping system. Our certified laboratory 
staff ensures testing and monitoring techniques to maintain system compliance. The treatment 
facility is on line 365 days each year. 



FY/94 



FY/95 



FY/96 



Hydrants Repaired 


54 


43 


58 


Hydrants Replaced 


8 


3 


8 


Hydrants Flushed 


24 


14 


9 


Water Main Breaks Repaired 


32 


18 


26 


House Service Leaks Repaired 


8 


17 


14 


House Services Renewed 


6 





10 


Water Main Taps 


8 


17 


4 


New Water Meters Installed 


47 


89 


118 


Old Water Meters Replaced 


111 


144 


114 


Water Meters Repaired 


9 


3 


3 


Water Shut Offs/Turn On 


171 


247 


181 


Gate Boxes Adjusted 


34 


61 


58 


Gallons of water treated (in millions) 


1,750 


2,095 


1,952 


Average daily gallons pumped (in million gallons) 


4.794 


5.741 


4.941 


Maximum day (in million gallons) 


11.561 


13.403 


11.232 



50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future arid the quality of life 
in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property; but, Mith the changing times of 
increasing social problems, our agency has become more service-oriented to the community. To 
continue our mission, we Mill maintain an open door policy to the community, Mor king Mith their 
suggestions, needs aid thoughts so tliat Me may preserve the May of life that Me all enjoy in Aidover. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Year 1996 was an exciting year for the Police Department in preparing assignments for 
all of the events dealing with the 350th Anniversary Celebration. The challenge of planning security 
for the visit of former President George Bush to the coordination of the 350th Parade, one of the 
largest events Andover has ever held, by ensuring the safety of the marchers and sightseers, to the 
orderly detouring of vehicle traffic around the parade routes and direction to the parade parking lots, 
was a major task. The parade required the services of all Police personnel, all members of the 
Auxiliary Police, the Civil Defense Communications Unit and outside agencies which included the 
Massachusetts State Police and forty officers from other communities. The parade was a great 
success due to the cooperation of all individuals involved. 

The Department also saw the retirement of Officer Richard Aumais after thirty-seven years 
of service and Officer Da\id Grant after twenty-nine years of service. The Department was fortunate 
to have been able to hire two Andover residents. Officer Timothy Hagerty and Officer Robin Cataldo, 
as their replacements. The Town also received a "DARE" grant which allowed the Department to 
hire Officer Daniel Leonard as well. 

William Bruner was hired to fill a vacancy in the Communications Division. 

The last phase of the Police Communication upgrade was completed with the installation of 
equipment in the dispatch area. 

RECORDS TRAINING DIVISION 

The Records Training Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. 
This support service enables the Department Information System to flow efficiently. The Records 
Division is the merging point of all of the departmental units. It allows the Department to work as 
a cohesive entity in order to f ulfill its intended mission. The RecordsTraining Division accomplished 
the following in 1996: 

885 requests for reports from the public. 

86 firearm identification cards were issued. 

25 requests for personnel record checks. 

15 requests for criminal record checks. 

15 requests for specific statistics regarding accident locations and traffic patterns. 



51 



5 persons were processed under the new Sex Offender Registry Law. 
Installed and implemented a new photo imaging system allowing for 24-hour on-line access 
to departmental arrest and evidence photos. 

PC's in the department were networked to facilitate the sharing of hardware resources 
A query station software package was purchased to enable the department to have flexibility 
in generating reports and allowing the department to process statistics into meaningful and 
use information for the officers and public. 

Implemented a new procedure for the false alarm billing as outlined in the updated Town By- 
law. 

A student intern from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell assist with filing and other 
routine tasks in the Records Division. 

Utilized a retire police officer through the Senior Tax Voucher Program to assist in the 
purging of sensitive departmental reports and records. 

Received a $20,000 Community Policing Grant for a citizen survey and equipment upgrade. 
Received a $13,000 DARE Grant to continue the support of the newly implemented program. 
Received a $7,000 Executive Office of Public Safety Grant for the Criminal Justice 
Information System Transfer Project. 

Purchased an in-car video camera with a portion of the 1995 Executive Office of Public 
Safety Grant to be utilized for the development of in-house training programs. 
Worked with the Town Personnel Department in the development of an RFP for Diversity 
Training and interviewed perspective vendors to select the appropriate curriculum. 
Developed a report review training lesson plan that was presented to all supervisors. 
Processed three new recruits through the Departmental Field Training Program. 



DETECTIVE DIVISION 

During 1996, members of the Detective Division investigated 341 reported incidents. Serious 
crimes were down compared to the previous year as well as reported breaks into dwellings and 
businesses. After investigations regarding these breaks, fifteen incidents were cleared by arrests. 
Early in the year there were four breaks that occurred in the west area off of Lowell Street. A 
suspect was identified and arrested on warrants for those breaks. During the spring months, the south 
section of Town experienced the theft of numerous expensive bicycles and the theft of power hand 
tools from garages and sheds. A suspect was identified and a surveillance set up to monitor the 
suspect. As a result of that investigation, the suspect was charged with breaking into five buildings 



52 



and numerous thefts. The suspect admitted to stealing over 100 bicycles during the prior year and 
a half. A total of fifteen breaks were cleared by detectives in 1996. 

Robbery reports were down from seven during 1995 to four in 1996. A freshman student at 
Andover High School was assaulted and robbed after bragging he was carrying $800 in cash. The 
investigation resulted in five arrests and convictions at District Court. Detectives combined efforts 
with the Patrol Division after the robbery at Bailey's Mobil Station on River Road. Three suspects 
were arrested after crashing their vehicle in Lowell. Latent prints were used as evidence in court and 
all three involved were convicted at Superior Court. An investigation is on-going regarding a 
robbery in the Shawsheen Plaza where a local business was robbed of their night deposit. 

Incidents of fraud by check and credit cards more than doubled in 1996. Dietectives 
investigated forty-five reported cases of fraudulent thefts totalling $25,116. All cases have been 
cleared by payment or court action. Local Health Clubs have been victimized by suspects entering 
locker rooms and stealing credit cards. The cards are being used outside the Merrimack Valley area 
and several arrests have been made. Recommendations have been made to increase security at clubs 
and limiting access to the locker room areas. 

The Juvenile Officer was involved in numerous investigations requiring contact with fifty-four 
juveniles and their families. Most of the juvenile cases involved truancy problems, stubborn children 
or runaways. 

During 1996 the Division attempted to locate latent fingerprints at seventy-five crime scenes. 
As a result, twenty-two incidents were cleared. The Division also continued to assist other agencies 
in latent print recovery resulting n six identifications being made. The breakdown by types of cases 
matched with latent prints is as follows: 

Breaking and entering dwellings/buildings 5 

Breaking into vehicles 6 

Recovered stolen vehicles 8 

Larceny of motor vehicle 1 

Larceny 1 

Armed Robbery 1 

During the past year, the Detective Division processed a total of 443 booking photographs, 
1 19 handgun permits and 83 firearms identification cards. Over 100 local residents were fingerprinted 
on request for adoption or employment purposes. Photographs of 93 crime scenes were taken. The 
Division now has a digital imaging system that allows instant access to booking photographs through 
the Department master card index. Over 1,000 past booking photographs have been reprocessed 
digitally and are now attached to master cards. 

As in past years, the Detective Division continues to be involved in community activities. A 
large number of youths were fingerprinted at a Safety Fair at the YMCA. They have participated in 
programs at local schools and the Andona Society's Safety Saturday when they combined efforts with 
the DARE Officer to promote the new Drug Education Program in the schools. 



53 



ANTMAL CONTROL 

In 1996, the Animal Control Division saw a slight increase in dog complaints and loose dogs 
and an increase in dogs licensed due in part to public awareness of the hazards of rabies and 
enforcement. The number of confirmed rabid animals decreased in 1996. 

The Animal Control Officer attended several seminars on rabies sponsored by the State. He 
became a member of the Northeast Ritual Crime Intelligence Association and received a certificate 
for attendance at an advanced 3 -day seminar on Cults and Criminal Activity sponsored by the 
NRCIA. He spoke to various groups on animal safety and rabies awareness including several local 
schools, The Andona Society's Safety Awareness Program and any interested residents. 

1994 1995 1996 



Number of citations issued 


43 


41 


39 


Fines/fees collected 


$2,524 


$2,072 


$2,403 


Dog Complaints 


642 


523 


545 


Impounded Dogs 


107 


95 


100 


Lost Dogs 


49 


55 


54 


Dogs Found 


34 


50 


44 


Impounded Cats 


30 


25 


27 


Numbers of calls answered 


1,962 


1,472 


1,372 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 

In 1996, the Emergency Management Unit saw the beginning step of a new Master Disaster 
Plan designed to handle all types of major disasters. The Unit was tested and utilized during the flood 
at the end of 1996. The flooding situation lasted several days and allowed the Unit to put into action 
the services of the Auxiliary Police and Communications Unit. 

The Emergency Management Section also arranged a two-day seminar on the Incident 
Command System which deals with the chain of command during a disaster involving many 
departments or agencies. The Police, Highway, Fire and Health Departments as well as 
representatives of private companies in Andover and the Merrimack Valley attended the training 
session. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year particularly at several 350th Anniversary events. These are very dedicated 
groups of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services. 



54 



Andover Police Department 

Annual Summary 





IllllllllllllllllllllllffiliSJtfjWffl 












Total Incidents 


22,023 


24,337 


23,807 


22,378 


25,501 




Adult Arrest 


476 


529 


469 


454 


365 


Juvenile Arrests 


28 


47 


40 


17 


27 


Total Arrests 


504 


576 


509 


471 


392 




Rape 


4 


8 


3 


1 


1 




B&E 


175 


172 


156 


134 


121 




Assault 


87 


72 


93 


97 


58 




Larceny 


587 


386 


506 


619 


607 




Stolen MV 


152 


145 


115 


104 


93 




Stolen Bicycles 


69 


40 


55 


70 


62 




Domestic Abuse 


28 


33 


30 


29 


36 




MV Fatalities 


4 


2 


3 


3 


2 




MV Accidents 


1,182 


1,224 


1,240 


1,219 


1,318 




Vandalism 


282 


304 


337 


223 


227 




Parking Violations 


10,100 


11,123 


12,049 


10,349 


10,074 




MV Citations 


3,025 


3,179 


4,105 


3,760 


3,578 




Mileage 


403,983 


381,758 


393,893 


393,901 


400,263 




Gasoline 


44,045 


36,281 


35,339 


34,573 


36,020 



55 



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56 



Andover Police Department 

Calls for Service 
1996 




Tues 

14% 



57 



Andover Police Department 

Calls for Service 
1996 





Zone 5 

9% 


Zone 6 

15% 




Zone 4 

15% 


x\ ■ 

/; V'.:, . Wmg^ 

/ 'IH 




Zone 1 








I 18% 



Zone 2 

20% 



58 



Andover Police Department 

Calls for Service 
1996 



5-1 shift 
40% 




9-5 shift 

43% 



1-9 shift 

17% 



59 






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61 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Fire Department is to proudly protect lives and property by 
providing prompt, skillful, cost-effective fire protection and life safety services to the residents of 
Andover. 



To achieve its mission, the Fire Department strives to prevent loss to property from fire or 
fire-related activities through inspections, training and maintaining its fire alarm system; loss of life 
through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services using both fire and ambulance 
vehicles. The Department provides programs to increase fire safety awareness among area citizens 
annually in all schools and whenever requested by private organizations, industries and businesses. 



1994 



1995 



1996 



Total Incidents: 


5451 


5408 


5410 


. Fires 


248 


233 


239 


Rescues 


23 


13 


12 


Miscellaneous Alarms 


70 


53 


174 


Accidental Alarms 


638 


535 


860 


Mutual Aid (Fire Calls) 


35 


30 


58 


False Alarms 


130 


161 


180 


Violations 


26 


6 


8 


Ambulance Emergency Calls 


2044 


2008 


2105 


Ambulance Mutual Aid Calls 


224 


313 


227 


Fire Prevention Activities 


2140 


2062 


1767 


Permits/Licenses Issued: 


1945 


1646 


1745 


Smoke Detectors 


790 


599 


665 


Report Copies 


64 


38 


67 


Blasting Permits 


13 


8 


8 


Cutting/Welding Permits 


20 


30 


17 


Dumpster Permits 


122 


59 


111 


Fireworks Display Permits 


1 


1 


1 


Gunpowder Storage Permits 











Liquid Gas Storage Permits 


46 


34 


39 


Flamm. Liquid Storage Permits 


3 





3 


Miscellaneous Permits 


9 


. 8 


3 


Open Air Burning Permits 


493 


549 


523 


Oil Burner Install Permits 


181 


147 


117 


Reinspection Fees 


41 


25 


14 


Commercial Fire Alarm Systems 


13 


14 


9 


Special Suppression System Permits 





1 


1 


Sprinkler Install Permits 


26 


41 


39 


Tentage Permits 


5 


10 


19 



62 



1994 



1995 



1996 



Permits/Licenses Issued (Cont.V 



Underground Tank Recertification 
Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank Install Permits 
Master Fire Alarm Boxes 



Facilities: 



9 


4 


3 


109 


75 


107 











118 

Apparatus/Equipine 


125 
art: 


129 



Central Station 

32 North Main Street 



3 ambulances, 1 ladder truck, 
1 pumper, 1 boat, 4 sedans, 
1 brush truck 



West Station 

Greenwood & Chandler Roads 



2 pumpers, 1 fire alarm truck, 
1 boat, 1 brush truck 



Ballardvale Station 
Clark & Andover Streets 



1 pumper, 1 boat 



Personnel: 



1994 



1995 



1996 



64.5 



68.5 



68.7 



Income: 



Ambulance Fees $220,000 

Permits/Licenses 32,385 

Fire Alarm Box Fees 1 7,700 



$240,615 $315,954 

28,947 25,500 

18,750 18,750 



63 



STATISTICAL DATA 



Total Incidents 
Total Am b. Calls 
Total Permits/Lies. 
Total MA Amb.Calls 
Total MA Fire Calls 




6000 
5000 
4000 
3000 
2000 
1000 




MONIES COLLECTED 




1994 



1995 



1996 



I j Amb.Fees H Perm/Lie Fees 

M FABoxFees Ki 



64 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



1994 1995 1996 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef calves under one year 

Number of beef cows over two years 

Number of beef heifers one to two years 

Number of beef bulls 

Number of beef cattle over two years 

Number of beef cattle under two years 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 

Number of donkeys 

Number of horses (includes work & saddle horses) 

Number of ponies 

Number of goats 

Number of sheep 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 



33 


23 


24 


29 


15 


68 


21 


20 


21 


15 


15 





42 


50 





10 


11 





10 


10 



72 
15 


8 


26 


11 


2 


2 


2 


2 








68 


60 


52 


15 


19 


19 


18 


11 


24 


8 


7 


2 


68 


155 


102 


3 


2 


2 



66 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The mission of Community Services is to provide the residents ofAndover a myriad of social, 
educational, cultural and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and accessibility for all. 
Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and incorporate ideas into valued 
programs for its citizens now and in the future. 

Community Services offers year round recreational, enrichment and cultural programs for 
residents of all ages. The majority of the programs are held at the public schools, Recreation Park, 
Pomps Pond, Central Park and other in-town facilities. Community Services continues to transfuse 
residents' ideas into valued programs. A vigorous departmental effort continually improves service 
to our community. Health enrollment is attributed to a repertoire of community-based instructors, 
streamlined registration including fax, VISA/Mastercard, overnight mailbox and increased 
identification with the DCS "Blue Book". Program booklets are mailed to all resident households 
in January, May and September. Enrollments have increased over the past year in all programs 
including classes and playground programs. 

The Youth Services Division, begun two years ago through the Tobacco Cessation Grant, 
now operates under the auspices of Community Services. A community-based group, Friends of 
Andover Youth, successfully rallied for a van for the Andover Youth Services at the Special Town 
Meeting in October. Some of the more popular events offered by Youth Services were "Summer 
Madness" trips, concerts and dances at the Town House, the Lacrosse Club and Outward Bound. 

The most popular children's programs continue to be soccer, the baseball clinic, fencing and 
school vacation programs. For adults, tennis, dog obedience, yoga and the Internet courses remain 
on top of the highest enrolled programs. 

The Revolving Account continues to create more opportunities for residents. Last summer, 
the baseball program, Studio for the Arts, Club for All and the Youth Services trips were funded 
through this account and were all well attended. 

The Department sponsored two highly successful 350th Anniversary Celebration events - 
Family Field Day and Main Street Madness. Both programs highlighted youth participation in our 
community. Thousands of youth were in attendance. 

Funds were received from the Andona Society, Quota Club ofAndover, the Vineyard and 
other local businesses to help off-set the summer concert series, playground equipment and summer 
scholarships. 

Volunteers from the Senior Citizen Tax Voucher Program worked in the DCS Office. Five 
volunteers assisted throughout the year with registration, general office duties, evening program 
assistance and the opening of Pomps Pond and Recreation Park. 

DCS looks forward to continuing to provide citizens with quality social, cultural, educational 
and recreation opportunities. 



67 



Class and program revenues are as follows: 



Class Participants 
Class Revenue 
Programs (camps, trips) 
Master Card/Visa Account 



1994 


1995 


1996 


3,897 


4,136 


4,524 


$148,212 


$204,028 


$214,562 


$111,600 


$143,007 


$122,803 


$ 82,298 


$ 97,848 


$134,682 



GR. LAWRENCE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

The Annual Report for fiscal year 1996, covering the period from July 1, 1995 through June 
30, 1996, was accepted and approved at a regularly scheduled meeting of the Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational Technical High School District Committee held on November 12, 1996. The 
report is prepared each year in conformity with the terms of the Agreement to Establish a Regional 
School District. Participating communities in the district are the City of Lawrence and the Towns 
of Andover, North Andover and Methuen. 



1993-94 



1994-95 



1995-96 



Enrollment 


1,475 1,501 


1,384 


Andover students 


27 14 


12 


Placement of graduates/employment 


78% 82% 


80% 


Business Firms with 


1,952 1,960 


2,023 


Coop. Work Agreements 






The following courses were offered during the 1995-96 school year: 




Allied Health Technician 


Autobody 




Automotive 


Carpentry 




Clothing 


Cosmetology 




Construction & Building/Painting 


Culinary Arts 




Data Processing 


Distributive Education 




Drafting 


Electrical 




Electronics 


Food Tech. Management/Clothing , 


Graphic Communications Technology 


Heavy Equipment 




Industrial Electronics 


Machine Technology 




Major Appliance/Air Conditioning/ 


Metal Fabrication 




Refrigeration 


Plumbing and Pipefitting 





Small Engine Repair 



68 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 
Tina B. Cirdwood. Chairman 
David A. Birnbach, Secretary 
Susan T. Dalton 
Eric |. Nadworny 
Lloyd |. Willey 



ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 01810 
(508) 623-8501 
FAX (508) 623-8505 



RICHARD E. NEAL 
Superintendent of Schools 



ANNUAL REPORT 
1996 
Andover School Department 



Throughout 1 996, the student population of the Andover Public Schools 
continued to rise at a steady rate with the total population reaching 5501 students. By 
level, there were 1319 students at Andover High School; 1364 at the middle schools; 
2787 in grades K-5; and 31 Early Childhood students. These students along with the 
623 professional and support personnel are housed in one 9-12 high school, two 
middle schools of grades 6-8, four K-5 elementary schools, and one K-2 Primary 
Controlled Magnet School. The five elected School Committee members who 
establish the policy of the school system meet at least twice monthly. The FY '97 
appropriation of $ 28,916,000 enabled the school department to maintain its basic 
educational program for the students of Andover while continuing to move the school 
system forward in several significant areas as described below. Through the 
continued highly professional efforts of a very dedicated staff and faculty, the students 
of Andover continued to receive a very high quality educational experience. 

The comprehensive building program continued to move toward completion 
during the course of the year. The second of the three projects (South School, the first, 
was completed last year), the renovation and special area expansion of the Sanborn 
Elementary School, was completed on time for the opening of school in September, 
1996. Through this renovation project, an essentially "new" school greeted the 
students on the first day of school. In addition to a complete renovation of the existing 
building, a new media center and music room were added to the facility. As a result of 
the renovations, a technology lab has been installed and several specialty areas have 
been configured. 

The third portion of the project, additions and renovations to Andover High 
School, continued to move forward although at a pace slower than anticipated. The 
new "science wing", main entrance lobby, and field house were completed and were 
occupied for the 1 996-97 school year. Renovations within the existing building were 
started and are anticipated to be completed by the end of the summer of 1997. In 
addition, field reconstruction, parking changes, and a new entrance road all 



69 



progressed toward completion. The new facility additions have enabled the faculty to 
expand the depth and breadth of their curricular offerings and students have now 
begun to reap the benefits of this project. 

Near the end of 1996, a study of future space needs was undertaken with the 
assistance of a consultant firm. This work pointed out the need for additional spaces 
for students at both the elementary and middle school levels within the next five years. 
Both the elementary and middle school facilities currently are at maximum enrollment 
or beyond. A space needs advisory committee was formed to review all options to 
address the issue and their report will be presented to the School Committee in late 
February of 1997. The School Committee is expected to determine the best course of 
action to take in March and plans will be drawn accordingly. With enrollment 
projections showing a continued rise in student population for the foreseeable future it 
is obvious that some further construction, either additions or new, will be needed soon. 

School Committee and Central Administration 

Following the annual election in March, the Andover School Committee 
welcomed Mr. Eric Nadwomy as a new member. This was Mr. Nadwomy's first 
election to the Committee. At its first meeting following the election, Mrs. Tina 
Girdwood was elected as Chairperson and Mr. David Bimbach as Secretary of the 
Committee. One of the Committee's first tasks, along with the Administration, was to 
develop objectives for the 1 996-97 school year. The Committee articulated four broad 
objectives: 

1. Provide a K-12 curriculum that is responsive to varying student needs at all levels of instruction 
and which maximizes intellectual development in the areas of basic skill mastery, technology, and 
growth of fundamental knowledge. 

2. Provide all students the opportunity to maximize their potential in an atmosphere conducive to 
their social, emotional, and physical development. All students shall be challenged at their level of 
accomplishment and will be provided opportunities for individual progress, achievement, and 
recognition. 

3. Provide an educational service delivery system which established priorities, identifies the 
resources needed to meet these priorities in a cost effective manner, and considers the impact on 
the educational environment (e.g., class size, space, noise and disruption factors, etc.). 

4. Enhance community confidence in the School System's objectives by involving parents, 
educators, and other constituents in the decision-making process. 

During the past year, several initiatives were started or continued which are 
worthy of note. Included in these are the continued upgrade of the K-12 science 
program with special emphasis on the high school program with new, expanded 
facilities, technology, and equipment; the introduction of a new language arts and 
reading program at the elementary level in grades 1 -3; the development and state 
approval of a five-year technology plan for the school system; the first steps in the 



70 



establishment of benchmarks or performance standards for each subject at each 
grade against which all students will be assessed; the development of new, expanded 
performance standards for teachers upon which the performance of all teachers will be 
evaluated; the development of a new evaluation model for all teachers; the 
compliance with Time & Learning requirements at the elementary and middle school 
levels; the computer automation and Internet access of all of the school's media 
centers; and the initiation of the study and planning to address continued space needs 
of the school system, especially at the middle and elementary school levels. 

The requirements of the Department of Education relative to Time and Learning 
are that every student attending high school be scheduled for a minimum of 990 hours 
of direct learning experience per year. This essentially means that each student at 
Andover High School must be scheduled into a direct learning class every period of 
the day, every day. Study halls, lunch periods, passing time, homeroom periods, etc., 
do not count towards this 990 hour requirement. To meet this mandate, changes in the 
scheduling of students, a possibly longer school day, and other modifications to the 
way the high school is organized will likely be necessary. The high school 
administration, staff, parents, and students are currently involved in a strategic 
planning program that will address these and other high school issues. Andover High 
School was one of 1 high schools in Massachusetts to receive a five-year grant to 
study its restructuring. 

Looking ahead, the Andover Public Schools plans to expand the introduction of 
the new language arts program into grades 4 and 5 next year. Also being explored 
are an alternative program for high school students not able to succeed in the 
traditional high school setting; the completion of the computer automation and Internet 
access of all of the school's media centers; provision for certified media specialists at 
each of the schools in the system; the implementation of the next phase of the five year 
technology plan; added supervision and evaluation of staff and programs; an increase 
in the number of registered nurses in the schools; and the maintenance of reasonable 
class sizes at all levels. 

Notable Milestones 

In the Spring of 1996, Mrs. Ellen Parker was appointed as Principal of Andover 
High School following a successful year as Interim Principal. Also, Mr. Peter Lueke 
was appointed as Assistant Principal at the High School. Mr. Lueke had previously 
been Assistant Principal at Beverly High School. At the Central Office, Mr. Bernard 
Tuttle was named School Business Administrator, replacing Ms. Gail Zeman who 
resigned to accept a similar position in Medford. Mr. Tuttle comes to Andover with 
experience as Business Administrator in the Canton School Department. Mr. Ray 
Tode was named as Technology Inclusion Coordinator for the Andover School 
System. Mr. Tode had previously been Technology Director for the Timberlane 
School District. 



71 



Mr. Joseph Piantedosi was appointed as Facilities Director, overseeing the 
Department of Municipal Maintenance. For the first time, this position is under the 
supervision and evaluation of the Town Manager and Superintendent of Schools 
jointly. 

The renovations and additions at the Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 
were completed in time for the opening of school in September. The staff and students 
were pleased to enter a completely refurbished school following a year of construction 
activities. At Andover High School, the new additions of a science and classroom 
wing, field house, and entry lobby area were completed and ready for occupancy in 
September. These wonderful facilities will provide opportunities for students to extend 
their learning well beyond what was possible previously. The renovation of the 
existing high school facility was begun and the entire project is now projected to be 
completed by September, 1997. 

All schools participated heavily in the celebration of Andover's 350th Birthday. 
Special events were scheduled at each school throughout the year. As a result of 
student donations, Andover's Town Banner was able to be restored. Every school 
participated in the parade in September with marching units and a float. 

Andover students continued to achieve well. Test scores on the Massachusetts 
Educational Assessment Program were well above the state average in all major 
categories at the elementary, middle and high schools. Overall average scores for 
schools in Andover were reported as follows: 





1996 






State 


1996 




Average 


Andover 


Grade 4- (97% tested) 






Reading 


1310 


1430 


Mathematics 


1330 


1430 


Science 


1360 


1440 


Social Studies 


1340 


1420 


Grade 8 - (95% tested) 






Reading 


1380 


1530 


Mathematics 


1330 


1490 


Science 


1330 


1480 


Social Studies 


1320 


1490 


Grade 10 -(93% tested) 






Reading 


1310 


1400 


Mathematics 


1310 


1400 


Science 


1310 


1420 


Social Studies 


1300 


1410 



72 



Business Department 

One of the primary responsibilities of the Business Office is the preparation and 
oversight of the School Department Budget. This includes monitoring expenditures, 
administering the financial provisions of labor contracts, purchasing, preparation of a 
five year budget forecast and tracking grant awards and disbursements. In addition to 
financial oversight, the Business Office is responsible for facilities management, data 
processing, student transportation and food services. 

Some areas of special focus this past year are: 

• Upgrading the technological capabilities of the Central Office. New 
computers and printers were purchased in preparation for installing new financial 
management software and network connectivity. 

• Elementary and Middle School Facilities Expansion. A consultant was hired 
in August to provide student population projections and complete a space inventory at 
the elementary and middle school levels. Options to address the need for more 
classroom space at both levels were prepared with cost estimates and an engineering 
study of both middle schools was made which also included cost estimates for 
recommended renovations. The Business Office provided valuable data relative to 
this project and continues to work closely with the School Committee and 
Superintendent of Schools on this matter. 

• Building Maintenance. A five year capital and extraordinary maintenance 
plan was developed in September. In conjunction with the Department of Municipal 
Maintenance, priorities were set and cost estimates established. The items in the first 
year constituted the School Department's CIP Project Requests for Fiscal Year 1998. 

• Upgrading student management software. The data processing adjunct of the 
Business Office has been coordinating the review and evaluation of new student 
management software. All building management and guidance personnel have been 
involved. It is anticipated that the selection process will be completed in early 1997. 

Personnel Department 

The Personnel staff received a real boost this year when their office moved to 
more spacious quarters. The move precipitated some much needed housekeeping 
and re-organizing, all of which has added to the department's increased efficiency. In 
the same spirit of efficiency and clean-up, members of the department are participating 
in continuous quality improvement teams which will review, revise, and streamline 
town and school record keeping systems. These changes, along with a new 
employee orientation program, are all scheduled for completion in 1997. 

Once every decade, the town hires an outside consultant to review the town's 



73 



classification program and wages and salary scales. With the passage of the 
Americans with Disability Act, which directs employers to make reasonable efforts to 
accommodate disabled workers, it was imperative that a complete review of all 
position descriptions get under way. It is a large undertaking, involving countless 
hours of analysis and writing, as well as many hours of interviews and discussions 
with supervisors and employees. This fall, Olney Associates, Inc., was awarded the 
contract to perform these services. 

The Personnel Department sponsored staff development programs for both 
town and school employees. Some of these programs complement the 
implementation of revised policies in the areas of drug and alcohol testing and sexual 
harassment. Education will continue in both areas over the next year. 

The staff was consistently busy with recruitment efforts throughout the year. 
Included in the hiring were a new Fire Chief and a new Facilities Director. The new 
Facilities Director is now a shared position, reporting to both the Town Manager and 
the Superintendent of Schools. The Superintendent appointed a new High School 
Principal, Assistant Principal, and a system-wide Technology Integration Coordinator. 

Finally, the staff would like to thank this year's senior volunteers, without whom 
much of the tedious housekeeping work could not have been completed. Thank you 
so very much, Mr. Ronald Valentine, Mr. Varkey Sohigian and Mrs. Barbara Haefling. 

Other Achievements 

Schools and Programs 

Andover High School 

• School Business Partnership 

•Approximately 25 students monitored by local business people. Students had 
opportunities to shadow professionals in careers they were interested in. This program 
has received support from the Service Club of Andover. 
•Two $1 ,000 scholarships were given to students in the mentor program. 

• Health Education 

•On November 14, 2,000 people attended an all day Health Fair in the field house. 
•Smoking Cessation Program for students implemented. 

• Media Center 

•In preparation for the new Media Center, and in conjunction with system-wide work, the 
High School Library took steps to become fully automated with the Winnebago System. 
All books and data will be entered into this automated system. 

• Physical Education 

•The staff came back to school able to use the new field house facility. Complementing 



74 



this welcomed space were renovated locker rooms, office space, training rooms and 
shower facilities. 

• Intramurals 

•An after school program and early morning (6:30 - 7:30 a.m.) program was provided. 
Approximately 30 students took part. 

• Fine Arts 

•Student work was shown at the Gutman Library, Harvard University, and Memorial Hall 

Library in Andover. 

•Art teachers worked to put together a High School float for the 350th parade. 

• School Culture 

•In addition to the number of clubs and activities which continue to thrive and provide 
students with varied experiences, a new Snowboard Club was formed in conjunction with 
the Youth Services Program. 

• Guidance 

•Dollars for Scholars developed an Andover Chapter. 
•A developmental guidance program was implemented. 

• Strategic Planning 

•A strategic Planning process was initiated at the High School. Action Plan Teams of 
teachers, parents, and students began addressing the areas of Curriculum, Instruction, 
and Organization. Further, a mission statement and statement of beliefs were developed 
to support the school's core values. 

• Academics 

•The Mathematics Department began in-service work to address changes in curriculum 

and extended time classes. 

•The World Studies Course (team taught interdisciplinary English/Social Studies) has 

incorporated numerous activities addressing content and different student learning 

styles. 

•The Latin and Art classes collaborated in a research project. 

•As requested by the NEASC accreditation study and five year report, the High School 

began to develop alternative assessment tools. 

Doherty Middle School 

• Commitment to Community Service. 

• Students lent their services towards helping out in the school's library, the main office, 
three elementary schools, the Senior Center, ESL classes, and PE classes. The 
community service club, Kids-for-Kids, collected money for the Globe Santa Fund, 
clothes for Lazarus House, and canned goods for another shelter. Each core team is 
committed to providing help to those in need. 



75 



• D.A.R.E. Program 

• To help children understand the destructive behaviors associated with drug abuse and 
violence, all grade six students were offered the opportunity to become informed on 
these topics through the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program. The 
classes are taught by an officer of the Andover Police Department with the assistance of 
the regular classroom teacher. 

• Handbell Choir 

• A handbell choir was added to its musical performing groups. This program occurs 
mostly after school. The choir practices at least once a week and performs for the public 
about every six weeks. The choir performed at the annual Bells of New England Festival 
at Faneuil Hall Marketplace, Andover Senior Center, and the executive offices of the 
Prudential Insurance Company, and at Doherty's music concerts. 

West Middle School 

• School-to-Career 

• West Middle School was awarded a $1000 grant to support School-to-Career initiatives. 
This provided an Internet connection for conducting career interest searches, materials 
for Grade 8 student studies of careers and reception materials for Career Day guest 
speakers. 

• TASC Corporation 

• A $1000 grant from TASC Corporation in Reading enabled the school to open a chapter 
of Future Scientists and Engineers of America (FSEA). Twenty-two grade 7 and 8 
students, monitored by professional engineers from TASC, study scientific questions 
and, using problem solving techniques, investigate possible solutions. 

• Student Leadership Conference 

• WMS hosted a regional student leadership conference for 20 neighboring middle 
schools. The collaboration of WMS student activity groups, Kids for Kids, Peace CORE, 
and Student Government with the Youth Services Council made this a highly successful 
endeavor. 

• Technology Training 

• Technology training, use and access at WMS continued to grow. Students are 
exposed to the use of the Internet both with their technology class instruction and 
increasingly in academic classes as project research involves them in on-line searches. 
Single unit classroom computers allow whole group in-class demonstrations and video 
presentation formats on a more frequent basis. 

Bancroft Elementary School 

• Multi-age Pilot Program 

• A multi age pilot program for grades 1 , 2, and 3 was launched in September after an 
intensive year of research, study and site visits. All constituencies were involved in the 
information process. The educational setting is an open loft with the learning laboratory 
for small group or one-on-one instruction when needed. 



76 



• Technology 

• A new computer lab was installed and became operational. Each class of students is 
scheduled in the lab at least once weekly. A grant enabled the school to purchase a large 
screen television as a teaching tool. 

• Partners in Excellence 

• The "Partners in Excellence" read-a-thon program provided the school with resources 
of approximately $10,000 which was used to purchase encyclopedias, CD ROMS, 
assorted software, and books. 

• Physical Plant 

• Improvements in the physical plant included a new floor in the art room, new heating and 
cooling units, painted front offices, and repairs to the gymnasium floor. 

Sanborn Elementary School 

• Space Utilization 

• Due to the number of students attending Sanborn School (463) it was necessary to 
utilize 17 classrooms for grades 1-5 along with three sessions of kindergarten. As 

a result, the music and art rooms were converted to classroom space. 

• Construction/Renovation 

• The construction and renovation project was in full swing during most of the winter, 
spring, and summer seasons. Classes rotated through the newly constructed 
media/library and music rooms for six week periods while their classrooms were 
renovated. The fall brought the completion of each of the various aspects of the projects. 
A school-wide curriculum was instituted in conjunction with the project under the umbrella 
theme of "Students Under Construction". 



• Character Development 

• The school continued to employ a successful character development program resulting 
in all students in grades three through five participating in a leadership training program, 
regular class and school problem-solving meetings, and conflict resolution strategies 
being implemented in the classrooms. 

• PTO Support 

• The Sanborn PTO continued to provide enormous support to the teachers and 
administration. They provided a variety of in sen/ice opportunities to staff, the funds to 
support school-wide special projects, and new state and national flags as well as a new 
podium for the school. School volunteers continued to number close to 200. Among 
the many volunteers were a number of senior citizens who enriched the school with their 
talents, skills, and spirit. 

Shawsheen Integrated Primary Magnet School 

• Enrollment 

• Enrollment at the Shawsheen Integrated Primary Program was again at capacity. 



77 



• Performance 

• Students at Shawsheen all participated in at least one performance. The kindergartners 
demonstrated physical education, art, and music skills; the first grade performed a musical 
about the environment entitled The Old Lady Who Liked Cats : while the second grade 
presented We Are All Earth's Children , an original musical featuring endangered species. 

• Staff Development 

• Staff development is a very important focus at Shawsheen. Summer curriculum 
development and a week long workshop in process writing were made possible through 
funds from the PTO. 

• Physical Plant 

• Through the CIP, Shawsheen's physical plant continued to be upgraded. Additional 
thermopane windows and new front doors were installed; the outside was painted; and a 
new double width driveway with a curbed sidewalk was constructed. In addition, an area 
on the second floor was converted into a computer laboratory which accommodates 25 
Macintosh computers. 

• Technology 

• Utilizing the computer lab, children at Shawsheen used CD-ROMS that complement the 
new language arts program, a new keyboarding program, as well as ClarisWorks programs. 
Children and teachers made good use of the lab as well as the other computers located 
throughout the school. 

South Elementary School 

• Building of Relationships 

• The 1995-96 school year was characterized by the building of relationships as the 
school embraced new families to South as a result of redistricting. Keys to the success 
were the extensive volunteer effort; generous funding from the PTO; support from Eisai 
Research, Genetics Institute, and Digital Corporation; and the outstanding staff at the 
school. 

• Extracurricular Activities 

• The Odyssey of the Mind teams went on to the World Competition in Iowa. The Math 
Olympiad Team made up of 35 fourth and fifth graders, received a certificate for highest 
achievement as a team. The partnership with Genetics Institute brought about successful 
collaboration for the fifth graders. "Beyond the Basics", the before/after school club 
program, included over 300 children. 

• Staff Training 

• The school staff engaged in training in "Science and Technology for Children", state of 
the art units for all grade levels. 

• Cultural Events 

• Molly Sullivan of the US Olympic Fencing Team spoke on Self-esteem 

• Michael Glaser, scientist, author, and illustrator, brought his collection of tide pool 
animals to the third grade. 

• Elisa Permain spoke to the entire school on "Folk Tales from Around the World" 

• Educator Presenters from Plimoth Plantation spoke to first and second graders on "A 



78 



Day in the Life of a Pilgrim." 

• Marcia Estabrook, Mother Goose, came to visit both sessions of kindergarten 

• "South Swings" was conducted with a visit from Artist Semenya McCord in a "Journey 
into Jazz." 

• Also, Invention Convention; Acton Science Museum; Gregory Maguire, author; and 
Poet Mary Chivers. 

• Forest Study 

• A new study of the forest was implemented by the third grade team using an outdoor 
classroom in the wooded area at the school. 

• Playground 

• Thanks to the Playground Committee, a new "Castlemania" was constructed at the 
school. 

West Elementary School 

• 350th Celebration 

• Many activities related to the Town's 350th birthday celebration were conducted. 

• Eighty-six students marched in the parade. 

• West's float, entitled "Reach for the Stars" was a great success. 

• Fifth Grade class created a giant quilt which is on display in the auditorium. 

• Public Service 

• Student Council members were involved in many public service activities. 

• Collected donations of goods and food for the People's Pantry. 

• Volunteered time to work at the People's Pantry. 

• Organized school-wide clean-up of grounds. 

• Raised money for charity by holding bake sale. 

• Raised money by participating in Walk for Hunger. 

• Readers' and Writers' Conference 

• The first annual WERAWC, West Elementary Readers' and Writers' Conference was 
held. Highlights were: 

• Eight storytellers, published authors, and illustrators made appearances. 

• Twelve member teacher committee worked to organize the event. 

• About 80% of the parent population attended. 

• Students read their own works during publishing parties. 

• School-wide Activities 

• Jump Rope for Heart 

• Easter Seals Shoot Out 

• Student run store provided scholarships for Outdoor Education 

• Math Olympiad team placed among the top 10% in the world 

• Grade 4 celebrated UN Day with a cultural fair 

• Staff Development 

• Instructional Leaders Workshop 

• GLEC Instructional Practices Workshop 



79 



• Peer Observation/Collaboration Program 

• Staff participated in over 100 professional development courses, workshops, and 
graduate courses. 



Athletics 



• Sixty (60) teams in seventeen (17) sports at the varsity, junior varsity and freshman levels. 

• Varsity teams had combined records of 244-1 10-10 for a .710 winning percentage. 

• Twenty-three varsity teams participated in post season tournament play. 

• New Andover Field House opened on September 1, 1996. 

• Over 1300 roster spots were filled in 1996. 

• All athletic facilities will be brand new or will have been rehabilitated during the building project. 

• Head football and track coach, Dick Collins, retired after a brilliant thirty-seven year career. 

• Head girls' swim coach, Marilyn Fitzgerald, named Woman of the Year by Lawrence Eagle 
Tribune. 

• Athletic Director, James Hurley, named Merrimack Valley Conference President for second time. 

Physical Education 

• Curriculum/Program 

• High School program organized into two courses to provide more option for students. 

• High School courses offered as multi-grade level courses. 

• New adaptive physical education assessment instrument for pre-K through grade 2 
students developed. 

• 19% of students received Presidents' Award for scoring in the 85th percentile or higher 
in each of the five test areas. 

• 47% of students scored at 75th percentile or higher. 

• 86% of students score higher than national average for test. 

• Andover test scores have improved six percentiles for boys and nine percentiles for girls 
over the last ten years. 

• Noteworthy Recognitions 

• Physical Education teacher Daryl Arsenault was awarded the Amelia Riou Award by 
MAHPERD at annual state conference. This award recognizes one teacher in the state as 
outstanding "hands on" practitioner. 

• The recently developed adaptive physical education assessment instrument was 
selected to be presented at the annual MAHPERD Conference. 

• Activities 

• Fourth and fifth grade track relay meet had 910 students participating. 

• Fourth and fifth grade one mile cross country run had 90 students participate. 

• Jump Rope for Heart and Easter Seal Shootout charity fund raising activities held at 
Sanborn and West Elementary schools. 

• Facilities 

• New field house at high school completed and in full use by all programs 

• High school locker room additions and renovations completed and in use. 

• Sanborn Elementary gymnasium and storage room renovations completed and in use. 

• Renovations to playing fields at Sanborn and South Elementary schools completed. 

• Construction/Renovation of High School/West Middle School playing fields continues. 



80 



II 
I 



Health Education 

• A formal analysis of the Great Body Shop (Andover's Comprehensive Health Curriculum for 
Grades K-5) pre and post test results was conducted for all classes, grades, and schools. The summary 
demonstrated a 20% gain in knowledge, 5.5% gain in values, and an 8.9% gain in behavior for an overall 
performance gain of 13.8%. 





PRE-TEST PERFORMANCE 


POST-TEST PERFORMANCE 


C WN IN PERFORMANCE 


SCHOOL 


KNOW- 
LEDGE 


IBEHA- 
VALUES IviOR 


OVERALL 


KNOW- 
LEDGE 


8EHA- 
VALUES VIOR 


OVERALL 


KNOW- 
LEDGE 


VALUES 


|beha-~ 

[VIOR 


OVERALL 






| 




















Bancroft Avaraga 


58.8% 


W.1%| 


78.5% 


70.5% 


78.7% 


93.0% 


84.7% 


84.1% 


10.9% 


4.9% 


62% 


13.6% 


Sanborn Avaraga 


55.8% 


88.1%| 


77.3% 


69.4% 


76.5% 


91.0% 


85.9% 


82J% 


20.8% 


29% 


8.7% 


13.4% 


Shawahaan Avaraga 


69.4V.I 


79.1%| 


69.4% 


74.5% 


86.8% 


87.4% 


872% 


882% 


17.4% 


8.3% 


17.8% 


13.7% 


South Avaragj 


57.5% I 


86.3% 1 


77.3%l 


70.1% 


77.5% 


90.5% 


86.7% 


83.5% 


20.0% 


42% 


9.3% 


13.5% 


W«it Avaraga 


532%l 


85.6% 1 


80.0% 


68.1% 


73.8% 


94.0% 


882% 


825% 


20.6% 1 


8.4% 


82%l 


14.5% 




I ! 








I | 


| 


Grand Avaraga 


57.9%l 


86.3% 1 


77.6%l 


70.1% 


77.8% 


91.8% 


86.5% 


83.9% I 


20.0% 1 


5.5% 


85% 1 


13.8V. 



• Human Growth & Development Training was conducted for all 5th grade staff. 

• Great Body Shop resource materials directory/inventory completed. 

• Health Education, Fine Arts, and Physical Education staff combined efforts to produce the 
second Great Body Shop Family Night Musical with over 400 students performing. 

• Bridging the Gap, a communication conference for families, was conducted for the 3rd year for 
all 7th graders and approximately 85% of their parents. A similar program was conducted for 
Sanborn 5th graders and their parents. 

• Department awarded a competitive Teen Dating Violence Prevention Grant for second year . 

• Harassment training arranged with Brown University's Desegregation Center for all 
administrators, staff, and complaint managers. 

• Parent to Parent continued to offer an extensive speaker's series and parenting workshops. 

• A Community Resource/Support Service Directory was published and mailed to all Andover 
residents. 



Technology 



• Notable Accomplishments 

• Continued work to develop broad base networking infrastructure within and between all 
of the schools and Central Office. 

• Completed wiring ail classrooms within every school for cable television. 

• Completed wiring Central Office for computer network. 

• Sixty new Macintosh computers installed at AHS in the Science Wing. 

• Thirty new Macintosh computers installed at AHS in the Applied Technology 
Department. 

• Thirty new Hewlett Packard Win95 computers installed in the Applied Technology 
Department. 



81 



• Twenty-five new Digital computers purchased for the AHS Math Department. 
8 Twenty-five new Macintosh computers purchased for the AHS Social Studies 
Department. 

• Installed a mini-network in each school to service the new Winnebago library 
computerized catalog and circulation system. 

• New computer lab of 30 Macintosh computers installed in the Bancroft, Sanborn, 
Shawsheen, South, and West Elementary Schools. 

• Extensive professional development programs provided for teachers to introduce new 
technology skills and upgrade and build upon existing skills. 

• Technology Council developing and refining technology curriculum for all levels and 
working to integrate technology into all curricular areas. 



Fine Arts 



• Performing Arts 

• All schools have at least one chorus. West Elementary, Bancroft, DMS, and WMS have 
two. AHS has a madrigal group as well as a one hundred voice chorus. Over half of DMS 
students involved in performing groups. 

• WMS, and DMS have string ensembles. DMS also has handbell choir. 

• Systemwide there are Elementary/Chamber Strings, Elementary Band, Middle School 
Jazz Band, and the All Town Orchestra. 

• Notable Accomplishments 

• Bancroft School Chorus chosen to perform at MMEA All-State Conference. 

• Marching Band took a gold at NESBA finals placing second in their class. 

• Fifteen middle school students chosen to perform at Junior District. 

• Ten high school students chosen to perform at Senior District. 

• Seven high school students chosen to audition for All-State. 

• Visual Arts 

• One high school student accepted to Art All-State. 

• Boston Globe Awards to AHS students: 4 honorable mentions, 4 silver keys, 2 gold 
keys. 

• Andover's 350th Celebration 

• Over two hundred students K-12 performed at Phillips Academy. Forty pieces of art 
work from students were framed, matted, and exhibited in three locations in the 
community. 



II 



Special Education 

• The 1 1 .6% of Andover students receiving one or more services require approximately 1 9% of 
the school department budget. (The average of identified students in Massachusetts is 17%.) While 
there is some state reimbursement, localities must bear the lion's share of the costs. Looking at the last 
ten years indicates that in 1996 there were 637 students being served through special needs programs 
as compared to 739 in 1986. Forty-four (44) students were in out-of-system placements in 1996 
compared to forty-eight (48) in 1 986. 

• Provision of services to students with Special Needs primarily within regular classrooms has 
benefited countless "typical" students. Dedicated regular and special needs staff work together to serve 
aJl students. 



82 



• ESL - Three full time teachers provide services to students moving to Andover with limited 
English proficiency. These students come from many lands and speak many languages. At the close of 
1996, 54 students were receiving ESL services. Ten years ago, 8 students were receiving such services 
from a part-time teacher. 

• Health Services - Four full time nurses and six health assistants provide services to students and 
staff. The number of students with serious health problems has increased significantly. Emergency first 
aid, monitoring of immunizations and health regulations, administering medications which a doctor has 
prescribed are all part of the nurses' responsibilities. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Richard E. Neal 
Superintendent of Schools 



83 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL 

Construction continued throughout the year. The new science wing, new gymnasium and 
renovated locker rooms were ready for the opening of the 1996-97 school year. Renovated areas on 
the ground floor of the existing building were turned over in late November. 

At Town Meeting in March, warrant article #23, in the amount of $2,462,552, was approved. 
The additional funds were allocated to the construction contingency, soft cost budget and scope 
restoration. 

The volume of work performed during 1996 was $4.8 million. The total to date if $20.3 
million, of which $2.3 million is approved changes. The project was 90% complete at the close of 
1996. 



SOUTH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Renovations to the ball fields were completed in 1996. Punchlist items in the building were 
completed and a one-year warranty review was performed by the Town. Technology items were 
purchased during the year. 

At the close of 1996, there was a contingency balance of $13,000. 



SANBORN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Classroom renovations were performed through the 1996 school year. During the summer, 
corridor, gymnasium, cafetorium and office renovations were done. Outside, work was done on the 
ballfields and landscaping. 

The school was ready for occupancy for the 1996-97 school year. 

The volume of work completed during 1996 was $1.5 million. At the close of 1996, there 
was a contingency balance of $7,000; changes were 3% of the construction cost. The project was 
98% complete. Remaining work consists of exterior punchlist items to be completed. 



84 



ANDOVER PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the Town 
concerning the preservation of it historic and archeological resources. 

During 1996 the Commission was active in the following areas: 

Town Meeting 1996 

The Historical Commission became the Preservation Commission by vote of Town Meeting. 
The Commission expects that this name change will help prevent confusion with the Historical 
Society and Historic District Commission. 

Demolition Delay Bylaw 

The Commission heard requests for demolition from eight petitioners and held one public 
hearing about the removal of a carriage barn located behind the South Church at 41 Central Street. 
Demolition was approved with conditions including a detailed line drawing of the structure and 
photographs for archival purposes. This was the last remaining structure of its type in Andover. 

Local Historic Districts 

The Ballardvale Local Historic District Commission, appointed in December of 1995, 
developed design review guidelines for the district and began holding hearings. The historic survey 
of the 210 buildings included in the district is in progress. Dennis Ingram is the Preservation 
Commission's representative. 

Many residents of Shawsheen Village have expressed interest in forming a local historic 
district. Preservation Commission member Ray Flynn has been identifying and contacting those 
residents interested in forming a study committee. Our goal for 1997 is to see this committee 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen and then moving forward to determine the feasibility of 
establishing a district there. 

Heritage Education 

The Commission continued to promote heritage education this year by co-hosting the annual 
State Preservation Awards with the 350th Anniversary Committee and the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission at the Town House. This is the first time this prestigious award ceremony has been held 
in Andover. The Commission nominated 100 School Street, the old railroad depot, for a state award 
which was granted. Eleven awards were given state-wide. A current preservation project worthy 
of recognition in the community is the Monumental Arch at the West Parish Cemetery which was 
completed this year with the help of a state matching grant and significant fundraising done by the 
West Parish Garden Cemetery Committee. Two members of the Commission, Steven Kearn and 
James Batchelder, were active participants in this project. The Commission also continued to co- 
sponsor the historic building marker program with the Andover Historical Society. 



85 



350th Anniversary Celebration 

The Commission is truly proud of the dedication and effort put forth by Norma Gammon, 
Chair of the 350th Celebration. Our 350th anniversary year was outstanding in every respect. Her 
leadership was the key to its success. Three other members of the Commission chaired 350th events: 
Ann Constantine, Chair of the Inaugural event and Publicity Chair; Karen Herman, Chair of the 
House and Garden Tour and Steven Kearn, Chair of the Boston Pops Concert. James Batchelder, 
representing the Andover Historical Society, Chaired the Publication Committee for Andover. A 
Century of Change , a book written for the anniversary. Karen Herman also participated as a 
committee member of "Andover at 400 - Community, Land Use and the Environment". 

Design Review 

Commission and Design Advisory Review member Ann Constantine worked with Inspector 
of Buildings Kaija Gilmore and other DAG members to insure that new signage in downtown 
Andover is appropriate. The Commission appreciates Ann's effort to work constructively with 
business owners on design issues, particularly with regard to historic structures. 

Other Projects 

• 66 Poor Street, 1830 Joseph Poor House: Land Court upholds Zoning Board of Appeals 
decision to deny proposed condominium development. 

• Stowe Crossing/Woodbridge Jenkins Cemetery: archeological survey completed by UMass- 
Amherst for Massachusetts Historical Commission, preservation restriction to be held by 
Preservation Commission in negotiation. 

• 78 Maple Avenue: Preservation of circa 1850 firehouse by new owner (moved to the site in 
1883). 

• Completion of rehabilitation and grand opening of Marland Place, Assisted Living 
Community, formerly Marland Mills, 15 Stevens Street. 

• Abbot Academy Campus, now Phillips Academy: Continuing restoration of Draper Hall and 
Abbot Hall. 



Karen M. Herman, Chair 
Andover Preservation Commission 



86 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1948. The regular meetings of the 
Board of Commissioners are held on the second Thursday of every month at the main office, on the 
second floor of the recreation hall at Stowe Court. Board Members are as follows: 

Ronald Hajj - Chairperson 

Norma Villarrel - Vice Chairman 

Hartley Burnham - Treasurer, Governor's Appointee 

James Cuticchia - Asst. Treasurer 

Jason Fox - Board Member 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 218 units of state-aided elderly housing, 56 units 
of state-aided family housing, 3 1 units under the Mass. Rental Voucher Program (formerly the 
Chapter 707 Program) and 8 units of handicapped housing (Chapter 689). In addition, the Authority 
administers 59 Section 8 Certificates and 68 Section 8 Vouchers, which are federally funded through 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

The following shows statistical data for the past three years: 

STATE FUNDED PROGRAMS: 1993 1994 1995 



Income Limits: 


1 person 


$21,672 


$21,672 


$29,100 




2 people 


$24,768 


$24,768 


$33,300 




3 people 


$27,864 


$27,864 


$37,450 




4 people 


$30,960 


$30,960 


$41,600 




5 people 


$32,895 


$32,895 


$44,950 




6 people 


$34,830 


$34,830 


$48,250 




7 people 


$36,765 


$36,765 


$51,600 




8 people 


$38,700 


$38,700 


$54,900 


Vacancies: 


Elderly 


27 


36 


51 




Family 


11 


9 


15 


Average Rent: 


Elderly 


$224 


$219 


$223 




Family 


$356 


$357 


$246 


FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS: 


Section 8 Rental Assistance 




Income Limits: 


1 person 


$16,950 


$17,450 


$18,450 




2 people 


$19,350 


$19,950 


$21,100 




3 people 


$21,800 


$22,450 


$23,700 




4 people 


$24,200 


$24,950 


$26,350 




5 people 


$26,150 


$26,950 


$28,450 




6 people 


$28,050 


$28,950 


$30,550 




7 people 


$30,000 


$30,950 


$32,650 




8 people 


$31,950 


$32,950 


$34,800 



87 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort 
or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on eighteen (18) cases, disbursing 
$15,907.25 on approved cases. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal of 
$345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the direction of the 
Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the 
Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1995 $146,134.15 

Receipts - 1996 21.294.17 

$167,428.32 
Disbursements - 1996 15.907.25 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1995 $151,521.07 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, chosen on a staggered basis, by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved two applications in the amount of $606 during the year. 



Balance on hand 7/1/95 $33,530.08 

Income -FY-1996 2,009.52 

Expenditures - FY- 1 996 606.00 

Balance as of 6/30/96 $37,001.60 



88 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1996 









BALANCE 








BALANCE 


FUND 


BENEFICIARY 


PRINCIPAL 


JULY 1, 1995 


DEPOSITS 


INCOME 


DRAWN 


JUNE 30, 1996 


STABILIZATION 


TOWN 




1.198.637.81 


60,000.00 


36,215.40 




1,294,853.21 


CD WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




689,794.30 




48,119.79 




737,914.09 


INSURANCE 


TOWN 




311,611.92 




17,093.85 


25,000.00 


303,705.77 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 






275,628.53 




15,204.71 


15,000.00 


275,833.24 


POST WAR REHABILITATION 


TOWN 




33,093.16 




491.99 


33,585.15 


0.00 


ESTATE S.P. WHITE 


SPRING GROVE 


5,766.63 


9,257.05 




516.66 




9,773.71 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




12,538.05 


1.800.00 


372.96 


3.00 


14,708.01 


TOWN HALL RESTORATION 






205.13 




14.32 




21945 


CD&P-ROGERS BROOK 






3,920.77 




115.45 




4,036.22 


TDJ-SPECIAL 




14.300.00 


0.00 








0.00 


TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 






1,114,838.29 


5,199.584.98 


83,108.60 


3,930.050.58 


2,467,481.29 


J. GREELEY 


LIBRARY 


5,000.00 


5.000.00 




263.79 


263.79 


5,000.00 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


PRINCIPAL 


345,825.50 


345,825.50 








345.825.50 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


INCOME 




140,066.71 




24,929.29 


19.636.10 


145.359.90 


JOHN CORNELL 


WOODS COAL 


5.000.00 


33.530.08 




4,077.52 


606.00 


37.001.60 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10,000.00 


28,932.20 




1.947.22 


2.000.00 


28.879.42 


W.L RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7,845.81 


28,596.62 


7.06 


1,994.93 




30,598.61 


A. J. LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5,000.00 


13,576.73 




757.77 




14,334.50 


E.I. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWERS 


1,302.77 


1,518.70 




105.45 


18.70 


1,605.45 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300.00 


1,038.96 




72.47 




1,111.43 


SPRING GROVE 




275,000.00 


588,877.70 


36,687.00 


35,106.82 




660,671.52 


EMILINE LINCOLN 


A.V.I.S 


1.000.00 


1.012.47 




70.53 


12.47 


1.070.53 


EMMA J. LINCOLN 


A.V.I.S 




551.40 




38.41 


6.80 


583.01 


CONSERVATION FUND 


CONSERVATION 




33,134.64 




2,311.46 




35,446.10 


SUNSET ROCK EXT 


HAMMOND WAY 




5.169.54 




117.06 


436.25 


4,850.35 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




24,565.62 




520.86 


700.00 


24.386.48 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1.000.00 


7,987.59 




554.86 


90.00 


8,452.45 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


INCOME 




0.00 










FARRINGTON 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


1,112.11 




75.23 


60.00 


1.127.34 


BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


532.88 


872.37 




59.94 


23.63 


908.68 


ALLEN 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


206.58 




14.40 




220.98 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


8,665.15 




604.47 




9.269.62 


RICHARDSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1.000.00 


6.729.35 




469.43 




7,198.78 


A. & A.V. LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1.000.00 


4,519.85 




315.31 




4,835.16 


RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLARSHIP 


598.50 


598.50 








598.50 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 






979.37 


288.00 


69.10 


200.00 


1,136.47 


CONROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


250 00 


875.20 




61.05 




936.25 


AMERICAN LEGION 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200.00 


645.37 




45.02 




690.39 


CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 


SOUTH SCHOOL 


3.512.68 


0.00 


3,512.68 


145.26 


145.26 


3.512.68 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 


50.00 


395.72 




27.60 




423.32 








4,934,509.04 


5,301,879.72 


276.008.98 


4.027.837.73 


6,484.560.01 


FUNDS HELD IN AGENCY CAPACITY 
















SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




17,709.73 








17.709.73 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


INTERSET 




1,966.70 




121.53 


1.966.70 


121.53 


WEST PARISH 






2,338.77 




162.38 


28.77 


2,472.38 


CHRIST CHURCH 






7,704.83 




534.91 


94.83 


8,144.91 


ST. AUGUSTINES 






658.10 




45.70 


8.10 


69570 








30,378.13 


0.00 


864.52 


2.098.40 


29,144.25 


BXBS DEPOSITS WITH INSURERS 














324,378.00 
324,378.00 


M V LIBRARY CONSORTIUM 


LIBRARY 




354,945.22 


151,000.00 


17,762.60 


410,000.00 


113.707.82 








354.945.22 


151,000.00 


17.762.60 


410,000.00 


113.707.82 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


LOT SALES 


50,000.00 


154,634.49 


20,693.00 


7.740.59 




183,068 08 








154,634.49 


20,693:00 


7,740.59 


0.00 


183,068.08 


TRUST FUND BALANCE PER TREASURER 






5,474,466.88 


5,473,572.72 


302,376.69 


4,439,936.13 


7,134,858.16 



89 



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90 



il 



Town of Andover, Massachusetts 

Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 

and Changes in Fund Balances 

All Governmental Fund Types and Expendable Trust Funds 

June 30, 1996 















Fiduciary 






Governmental Fund Type 




Proprietary Fund Type 


Fund Type 


Total 






Capital 


Special 


Water 


Sewer 


Expendable 


(Memorandum 




General 


Projects 


Revenue 


Enterprise 


Enterprise 


Trust 


Only) 


Revenues: 
















Real Estate 


48,077,986.76 












48,077,986.76 


Personal Property 


1,247,887.27 












1,247,887.27 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


2,654,839.21 












2,654,839.21 


Intergovernmental 


4,668,935.27 












4,668,935.27 


Other Excise 


597,965.00 












597,965.00 


Penalties and Interest 


382,531.69 












382,531.69 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


2,016.00 












2,016.00 


Charges for Services - Water 








5,663,652.51 






5,663,652.51 


Charges for Services - Sewer 










2,124.933.27 


' 


2,124,933.27 


Fees 


71,820.14 












71,820.14 


DMM Facilities Rental 


81,915.17 












81,915.17 


Departmental Revenue - Schools 


27,522.39 




1.509.767.61 








1,537,290.00 


Departmental Revenue - Libraries 


39.002.48 












39,002.48 


Departmental Revenue - Cemeteries 


36.830.00 












36,830.00 


Departmental Revenue- Recreation 


268,765.95 












268,765.95 


Departmental Revenue- Ambulance 


315,852.93 












315.852.93 


Other Departmental Revenue 


129,330.79 




2.027,862.10 








2,157,192.89 


Licenses and Permits 


754,874.33 












754,874.33 


Special Assessments 


2,813.10 






6,147.10 


82,827.62 




91,787.82 


.-^Fines and Forfeits 


284,952.50 












284,952.50 


Investment Income 


661,802.03 






14,017.86 






675.819.89 


Other 


554.230.46 


118,417.50 








2,390.949.41 


3.063.597.37 


Total Revenues 


60,861,873.47 


118,417.50 


3,537.629.71 


5,683,817.47 


2.207.760.89 


2,390.949.41 


74,800,448.45 


Expenditures 
















General Government 


2.599,285.58 


8,688.60 


548,574.48 








3.156.548.66 


Municipal Maintenance 


3.777,260.46 




16,627.54 








3,793.888.00 


Public Safety 


7,655,781.35 


278,373.04 


490,611.70 








8.424.766.09 


Public Works 


6,297,516.02 


891,326.42 


923.092.53 


2,354.566.51 


1.311,164.04 




11.777.665.52 


Library 


1,692,047.73 


944,182.30 


30.345.44 








2,666.575.47 


School 


27.354.456.34 


18.817,380.70 


1,550.966.32 








47.722.803.36 


GLRVTHS 














0.00 


Fixed 
















Insurance 


579,418.68 












579,418.68 


Debt Service 


4.970.337.98 






2.081.873.00 


703.306.00 




7.755,51698 


Retirement 


2.569.702.48 












2.569.702.48 


State & County Assessments 


1.023,997.18 












1,023.997.18 


Unclassified 






12,775.85 






4.115,558.13 


4.128,333.98 


Total Expenditures 


58.519,803.80 


20,939,951.06 


3,572.993.86 


4,436,439.51 


2,014.470.04 


4.115,558.13 


93.599.216.40 


Other Financing Sources (Uses) 
















Transfers 


(3.408,669.33) 


23.669.33 








3,385.000.00 


0.00 


Debt Activity 




21.960.000.00 










21,960.000.00 


Other 


802,597.00 




126,253.35 


(621,614.00) 


(180,983.00) 




126.253.35 




(311.893.81) 




30.939.42 


(11,676.05) 


(5.010.30) 




(297.640.74) 


Total Other Financing 
















Sources (Uses) 


(2.917.966.14) 


21.983,669.33 


157.192.77 


(633,290.05) 


(185,993.30) 


3.385.000.00 


21.788.61261 


Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues over 
















(Under) expenditures and other 
















Financing Sources (Uses) 


(575,896.47) 


1,162,135.77 


121,828.62 


614,087.91 


7.297.55 


1,660.391.28 


2,989,844.66 


Fund Balance July 1, 1995 


6.952.112.73 


5.572.321.81 


740.911.84 


0.00 


0.00 


5,474,466.88 


18,739,813.26 


Fund Balance June 30, 1996 


6.376,216.26 


6.734.457.58 


862,740.46 


614.087.91 


7.297.55 


7.134.858.16 


21.729.657.92 



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103 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

DECEMBER 1,1996 

ARTICLE PROJECT NAME AUTHORIZATION 

ART 18, 1985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 1 ,160,000.00 

ART 62, 1993 CONSERVATION 430,000.00 

ART 25. 1 995 REC PARK IMPROVEMENTS 21 3,000.00 

ART 26, 1995 FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 384,000.00 

ART 23, 1997 HIGH SCHOOL RENOVATION 2,426,552.00 

ART 24, 1996 WATER DISTRIBUTION IMPROVEMENTS 2,050,000.00 

ART 47, 1996 SHAWSHEEN FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 4,000.00 

ART 53, 1996 CONSERVATION FUND 1,000,000.00 

ART 9A. 1 996 CONSERVATION LAND ACQ 1 ,500.000.00 



9.167.552.00 



Issue Dated December 1 , 1996 

ART 20-1 , 1 994 SCHOOL CONSTSRUCTION OVERRIDE 1 2,202,000.00 

ART 20-2, 1994 SCHOOL TECHNOLOGY OVERRIDE 1 ,000,000.00 

ART 44, 1 996 MIDDLE SCHOOL ROOF REPLACEMENT 1 50,000.00 

ART 32, 1 995 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENT 500,000.00 

ART 46, 1992 WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 243,000.00 

ART 66, 1996 ROAD REPAIR 45,000.00 

ART 26, 1996 ROAD IMPROVEMENTS 500,000.00 

ART 25, 1 996 STORM DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS 300,000.00 

ART 45, 1996 MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY • HVAC 250,000.00 

ART 47, 1996 SHAWSHEEN FIELD IMPROVEMENT 185,000.00 

ART 28, 1996 LAND FILL CLOSURE 125,000.00 

15.500.000.00 

Special Town Meeting October 1996 

ART 9A, 1996 CONSERVATION 1.500,000.00 

1.500.000.00 



104 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF RESERVE ACCOUNT AND COMPENSATION FUND 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1996 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Finance Committee: 

Town Clerk - Other Expenses 
Fire Department - Personal Services 
Finance Committee- Other Expenses 
Police Department - Personal Services 



Transferred to Surplus 



RESERVE FUND 



Transfers by Vote of Town Meeting, 
April , 1996 



8,300.00 

133,124.00 

2,353.00 

8,417.00 


From Taxation 


200,000.00 


47,806.00 






200.000.00 


200.000.00 



COMPENSATION FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Board of Selectmen: 



Public Safety - Personal Services 



Transfers by Vote of the Town Meeting, 
April , 1996 

From Taxation 



Balance to Surplus 



120,000.00 
120,000.00 
262,000.00 
382.000.00 



382,000.00 



382.000.00 



105 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUND ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1996 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 



PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



BOOK 
VALUE 



MARKET 
VALUE 



MARKET VALUE 

OVER 

BOOK VALUE 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



SECURITIES 


STOCK 


200 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


100 SHARES 


200 SHARES 


OTHER 



ALBERTSONS INC. 
AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING 
CENTRAL & SOUTHWEST CORP 
EXXON CORP 
GILLETTE CO 

ILLINOIS TOOL WORKS, INC. 
INT. BUSINESS MACHINE 
JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO 
KIMBERLY CLARK CORP 
MINNESOTA MINING MFG. 
MOTOROLA INC. 
PFIZER, INC. 

PIONEER HI-BRED INTL. INC 
SBC COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 
WACHOVIA CORP NEW 
TOTAL STOCK 



$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.00%, DUE 11/30/97 
$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 8.125%, DUE 2/15/98 
$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 7.125%, DUE 10/15/98 
$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.375%, DUE 8/15/02 
$10,000 PEPSICO INC. NOTE, 6.250%, DUE 9/1/99 
$10,000 IBM NOTE, 7.250%, DUE 11/1/02 
$20,000 WACHOVIA CORP NOTE, 6.375%, DUE 4/15/03 

TOTAL OTHER 

TOTAL SECURITIES 

TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



4,575.00 


7,125.00 


2,550.00 


5,062.50 


8,575.00 


3,512.50 


2,812.50 


2,562.50 


(250.00) 


5,887.50 


9,800.00 


3,912.50 


5,187.50 


7,775.00 


2,587.50 


3,787.50 


7,987.50 


4,200.00 


6,325.00 


15,150.00 


8,825.00 


5,137.50 


4,975.00 


(162.50) 


5,598.16 


9,525.00 


3,926.84 


5,367.30 


8,300.00 


2,932.70 


1,606.25 


6,125.00 


4,518.75 


3,206.25 


8,300.00 


5,093.75 


5,625.00 


7,000.00 


1,375.00 


4,162.50 


5,187.50 


1,025.00 


6,562.50 


1 1 ,300.00 


4,737.50 


70,902.96 119,687.50 


48,784.54 


14,955.30 


15,009.45 


54.15 


14,680.58 


15,346.95 


666.37 


14,878.13 


15,304.80 


426.67 


14,412.90 


15,103.20 


690.30 


9,740.00 


9,997.00 


257.00 


9,874.35 


10,200.00 


325.65 


19,944.40 


19,650.40 


(294.00) 


98,485.66 100,611.80 


2,126.14 


169,388.62 220,299.30 


50,910.68 


169,388.62 220,299.30 


50,910.68 



RESERVE FUND 



RESERVE CASH 

ANDOVER SAVINGS CD ACCOUNT 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



5,333.98 
2,542.75 

7,876.73 7,876.73 



0.00 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT 
BAYBANK 



TOTAL FUNDS 

INCREASE IN MARKET VALUE FROM 1/1/96 



3,002.72 3,002.72 



180,268.07 231,178.75 



20,780.30 



0.00 



50,910.68 



106 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

STATMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1996 



01/01/96 



SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 
PRINCIPAL FUND 



12/31/96 



PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 
SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 



5,109.67 -GAIN ON SALE OF SECURITIES 
161,341.91 -BROKERAGE FEES/TAX 

-INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEE 
TRANSFERS FROM RESERVE FUND 



3,359.06 PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

(493.37) SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 
(1,642.78) 
1,714.13 



0.00 
169,388.62 



166,451.58 



INCREASE 



2,937.04 



169,388.62 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 

(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 



CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS 
CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



4,995.85 DIVIDENDS RECEIVED 

3,055.60 INTEREST RECEIVED - BONDS/NOTES 

1,295.23 INTEREST RECEIVED - OTHER 



2,139.25 CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS 5,333.98 

6,768.78 CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 3,002.72 

565.40 PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 2,542.75 



9,346.68 



INCOME TOTAL 



9,473.43 



10,879.45 



EXPENSES 

ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL PROJECTS 
MISC.OPERATING EXPENSES 

EXPENSE TOTAL 

NET LOSS 
TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 
-ADDITIONAL FUNDS INVESTED 
-UNEXPENDED SCHOOL PROJECT FUNDS 
-10% OF INCOME (1/1-12/31/94) 

DECREASE 



5,743.89 
482.64 

6,226.53 

3,246.90 

561.48 

205.65 (7/1/95 - 6/30/96) 

947.00 



1,532.77 



175,798.26 



TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



180,268.07 



107 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1996 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 







CURRENT 


ADDITIONS 










BALANCE 


YEAR 


TO 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 




1/1/96 


NET INCOME 


PRINCIPAL 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/96 


H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 


1.980.90 


107.79 




2.088.69 




2.088.69 


J.W.BARNARD 


7.053.23 


395.18 




7,448.41 


200.00 


7.248.41 


ALICE M.BELL 


1.100.48 


61.87 




1,162.35 


45.00 


1.117.35 


THOMAS BLACK 


15.384.86 


951.84 




16.336.70 


750.00 


15,586.70 


EDNA G.CHAPIN 


2.511.72 


141.17 




2.652.89 


100.00 


2,552.89 


FRED W.DOYLE 


10.980.66 


611.60 




11,592.26 


500.00 


11.092.26 


WARREN F.DRAPER 


1.634.74 


91.81 




1,726.55 


70.00 


1.656.55 


WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 


2.085.56 


117.32 




2.202.88 




2.202.88 


ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 


1.102.11 


63.89 




1.166.00 


45.00 


1.121.00 


MYRON E.GUTTERSON 


1,148.02 


64.51 




1,212.53 




1,212.53 


ANDOVER GRANGE 


2.701.40 


152.05 




2.853.45 


100.00 


2,753.45 


NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 




930.72 


19,390.12 (A) 


20.320.84 




20.320.84 


MARGARET F. HINCHCLIFFE 


32.461.19 


1,825.66 




34.286.85 


1.200.00 


33,086.85 


PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 


10.402.17 


581.16 




10.983.33 


440.00 


10.543.33 


ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 


28.043.83 


1.576.81 




29,620.64 


1,000.00 


28.620.64 


HENRY WYATT 


4.623.16 


277.82 


670.00 (B) 


5.570.98 


500.00 


5.070.98 


AFB & WA TROW 


73,132.79 


4,695.42 


1,813.30 (C) 


79.641.51 


2,000.00 


77.641.51 




196.346.82 


12,646.62 


21,873.42 


230.866.86 


6.950.00 


223.916.86 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE) 

INTEREST INCOME 
DIVIDEND INCOME 

GAIN/ILOSS) ON SALE OF SECURITES 
BROKERAGE FEES/TAXES 
INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEES 
NET INCOME 



7.471.69 

5.568.21 

990.62 

(379.00) 

(1,004.90) 

12.646.62 



(A) Transferred from Punchard Alumni 
Assoc 3/96 

(B) Add' I funds contributed by Town 
Employee 7/96 

(C) Bal of funds transferred from Boston 
Safe 5/96 



FUNDS/SECURITIES HELD 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 
ANDOVER BANK CD's (2) 
PIONEER CASH RESERVES/TROW FUND 
PIONEER MUTUAL FUNDS/TROW FUND 
100 SHARES GTE CORP 
100 SHARES MERCK & CO 
100 SHARES MONSANTO CO 
100 SHARES WILLIAMS COS.. INC 
200 SHARES TECO ENERGY. INC 
100 SHARES WACHOVIA CORP. NEW 
$25,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.25%, 4/30/01 
$5,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 6.000%, 11/30/97 
$10,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.000%, 12/31/97 
$5,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 5.125%. 3/31/98 
$10,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 6.125%, 7/31/00 
$5,000 PEPSICO INC. NOTE. 6.250%, 9/1/99 
$5,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.375%, 8/15/02 
$5,000 IBM NOTE 7.250%. 11/1/02 
$20,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 6.25%. 2/1 5/03 
TOTAL 



MARKET 


BOOK 


VALUE 


VALUE 


6,618.11 


6,618.11 


28.078.06 


28,078.06 


3.676.07 


3,676.07 


79,350.42 


73.965.44 


4,537.50 


4,000.00 


7,962.50 


3,675.00 


3,887.50 


3,187.50 


5.625.00 


5.150.00 


4.825.00 


3.825.00 


5.650.00 


3,587.50 


25.062.50 


24.969.25 


5.003.15 


4.985.10 


10.012.50 


9.987.20 


4.954.70 


4.985.85 


10.003.20 


9.990.63 


4,998.50 


4,870.00 


5.034.40 


4.804.30 


5,100.00 


4.961.85 


19,987.60 


18.600.00 


240,366.71 


223.916.86 



108 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
William Francis Galvin, Secretary of the Commonwealth 



S Essex 

To either of the Constables of the Town or City of ANDOVER 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at Precincts: 
1.2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.8 . at the DUNN GYMNASIUM, ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL, ON 
SHAWSHEEN ROAD, ANDOVER, MA., on TUESDAY, THE 5TH OF MARCH 1996 
7.00 am to 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes to the Primary Officers for the election of candidates of political parties 
for the following office: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

DISTRICT MEMBERS OF STATE COMMITTEE (one man and one woman) 
for each Political Party for the SECOND ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 
SENATORIAL DISTRICT 

Members of the Democratic Town Committee 

Members of the Republican Town Committee 

Members of the Libertarian Town Committee 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and 
place of said meeting. 



Given under our hands this 



12th 



day o f February 



(Month) 



1996. 



James Barenboim 



William Downs 



Gerald H Silverman 



Barry R. Finegold 



Selectmen of : 



Andover. Massachusetts 
(Town) 



POSTED IN EACH PRECINCT 



(Indicate method of service of warrant) 



RONALD FORD 



(Constable) 



FEBRUARY 21. 1996 
(Month.Day) 



109 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES. MARCH 5. 1996 



At a meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover qualified to vote in Primaries, convened 
at the designated single polling place in precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight 
on March 5, 1996 at 7:00 A.M. agreeably to the requirements of the foregoing warrant, they did 
bring their votes as follows: 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 



VOTE 



Bill Clinton 

Lyndon II. I.nRouchc, Jr 

No Preference 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL DEMOCRATIC VOTE 



491 
17 
49 
23 
15 
595 



STATE COMMITTEE MAN 



David M. O'Brien 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL DEMOCRATIC VOTE 



450 

3 

142 

595 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 



Mary Jane Powell 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL DEMOCRATIC VOTE 



475 

5 

115 

595 



DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE (35) 



Karen Grasso Courtney 


369 


James A. Cuticchia 


358 


Norma L. Villarreal 


348 


Barry R. Finegold 


408 


Michael L Zimmer 


338 


John D. O'Brien, Jr. 


415 


James D. Dohcrty 


406 


Mark E. Courtney 


350 


John J Nolan 


346 


M. Rinchart-Stankicwicz 


327 


Anthony K Slankicwicz 


330 


Robert A. LaRochelle 


355 


lillen T. Muiphy 


384 


Peter G. McCarthy 


349 


Oalc Ross 


333 


Michael A. Frishman 


375 


Diane K. Hayncs 


335 


Mary Jane Powell 


369 


John J. Wilson, Jr. 


335 


Mary F. Middleton 


339 


Sean Gresh 


344 


Paul Stolberg 


335 


Albert A. Notini 


335 


David S. Barker 


333 


Diana S. LaRochelle 


353 


Gerald H. Silverman 


392 


John P. Hess 


351 


Linda G. Bloh 


340 


Ronald C. Hajj 


358 


Dorothy M. Winn 


348 


Susan C. Tucker 


440 


Barry Michaels 


332 


Nancy Stolberg 


350 


Theresa G. Murphy 


375 


Carlotto M. McCarthy 


345 


Blanks 


8325 


TOTAL DEMOCRATIC VOTE 




595 





110 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES. MARCH S. 1996 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 



VOTE 



Richard G. Lugar 

Morry Taylor 

Phil Gramm 

Patrick J. Buchanan 

Bob Dole 

Steve Forbes 

Lamar Alexander 

Alan Keyes 

Robert Doman 

No Preference 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL REPUBLICAN VOTE 



63 

3 

3 

502 

1327 

486 

189 

37 

2 

23 

14 

3 

26S2 



STATE COMMITTEE MAN 



Wayne E. I lincklcy 

John G Wragg 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL REPUBLICAN VOTE 



369 

1696 

3 

584 
2652 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 



Christine I lolmes 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL REPUBLICAN VOTE 



1862 

17 

773 

2652 



REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE (35) 






Christine Holmes 


1566 


Charles F. Dalton, Jr. 


1532 


Susan T. Dalton 


1544 


Gary M. Coon 


1944 


Paul W. Cronin 


1667 


John F. Moflitt 


1478 


Lloyd J Willey 


1473 


Maria Marasco 


1577 


Walter C Radulski 


1487 


Michael F. Mimno 


1449 


Mary Clark Webster 


1465 


James E. Fox 


1533 


Brian P. Major 


1436 


Robert E. Wescott 


1517 


Robert M Dalton 


1490 


John A. Simko 


1511 


William R. Mickey, Jr. 


1457 


James L. Edholm 


1466 


Kathleen D. Edholm 


1491 


Donald K. Ellsworth 


1463 


Susan L. Costello 


1477 


Allison H. Bailey 


1437 


Alexis J. Johnson 


1425 


Ward W. Coon. Jr. 


1528 


Ronald G. Estcs 


1442 


Susan O. Estcs 


1457 


Florannc P. Dailcy 


1426 


Ronald Wackowski 


1426 


Hartley M. Bumham 


1429 


John G. Wragg 


1497 


Joseph W. Dadicgo 


1418 


Kimberley Cronin 


1556 


Chester Darling 


1470 


Frederick Flather, 111 


1454 


Kathleen M.G. Radulski 


1501 


Blanks 


40331 


TOTAL REPUBLICAN VOTE 




2652 





111 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES. MARCH 5. 1996 
LIBERTARIAN PARTY 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

1 larry Browne 

Rick Tompkins 

Invin Schiff 

No Preference 

Blanks 

TOTAL LIBERTARIAN VOTE 



VOTE 

I 


1 

2 

4 



STATE COMMIT! EE MAN 

Blanks 

TOTAL LIBERTARIAN VOTE 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 

Blanks 

TOTAL LIBERTARIAN VOTE 



LIBERTARIAN TOWN COMMITTEE (3) 

Blanks 

TOTAL LIBERTARIAN VOTE 



12 
4 



112 



ANNOAL TOWN MEETIN G - APRIL 8.9.10.11 1996 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 
22 
23 

24 

25 

26 



DESCRIPTION 

Election 

Election of Officers not 
required by ballot 

Salaries of elected officials 

The Budget 

Town Budget transfers 

Transfer $421,095 Special Education 

Grant Authorization 

Road Contracts 

Free Cash - $1,500,000 

Unexpended Appropriations 

Chapter 90 Funds 

Unpaid Bills 

Town Report 

Property Tax Exemptions 
Statute Acceptance 

Rescinding of Bond Authorizations 

Community Services Revolving Account 
Statute Acceptance 



ACJCIQM 

TAKEM 



ATT. CEM. 
APPROVAL 



Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 
Approved 



Community Development Revolving Account Approved 
Statute Acceptance 

Municipal Maintenance Revolving Account Approved 
Statute Acceptance 

Council on Aging Revolving Account Approved 
Statute Acceptance 

Contracts in excess of three years Approved 
Statute Acceptance 

Accept grants of easements Approved 

Grant easements Approved 

Andover High School Construction Approved 
Bonding $2,426,552 

Water Distribution Improvements Approved 
Bonding $2,050,000 

Storm Drain Improvements Approved 

Bonding $300,000 

Road Improvements Approved 

Bonding $500,000 



113 



02B 



WARRANT 
ART. HP. 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

49 
50 



ANNOAL TOWN MEETINQ - APRIL 8. 9. 10. 11 1996 

DESCRIPTION 

Repainting Water Tanks 

Land Fill Closure 

Bonding $125,000 

Acorn Drive 

Street Acceptance 

Basswood Drive 

Street Acceptance 

Hazelwood Circle 

Street Acceptance 

Avery Lane 

Street Acceptance 

Atwood Lane 

Street Acceptance 

Stoneybrook Circle 

Street Acceptance 

Coventry Lane 

Street Acceptance 

Molly Road 

Street Acceptance 

Preston Circle 

Street Acceptance 

Windemere Drive 

Street Acceptance 

David Drive Improvements 

David Drive- Eminent Domain 

Recording/Finance Committee Meetings 

Recording/Selectmen's Meeting 

Replace Dispatch Center Radio Equipment Approved 

Approved 



ACTION 
XAEEH 


ATT. GEN. 
APPROVAL 


Approved 




Approved 




Not Laid Out 




Not Laid Out 




Not Laid Out 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Defeated 




Defeated 





I 



West Middle Roof Replacement 
Bonding $150,000 

Library HVAC Improvements 
Bonding $250,000 

Essex Gravel Pit 

Special Legislation 

Shawsheen Field Improvements 
Bonding $189,000 

Elm Street 

Eminent Domain 

Elm Street Parking Construction 

Development Impact Fees 

General Bylaw Amendment 



114 



Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Withdrawn 
Defeated 



i 



ANNUAL TOWH MEETING - APRIL 8.9.10.11 1996 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 

51 



52 
53 

54 
55 
56 

57 
58 
59 
60 

61 

62 

63 
64 

65 

66 

67 
68 
69 
70 

. 71 

72 

73 
74 

75 
76 



DESCRIPTION 

Rate of Development 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

Revision to the Master Plan 

Conservation Fund Appropriation 
Bonding $1,000,000 

Conservation Land Improvement 

Sewer Easement - City of Lawrence 



ACTION 
TAKEN 

Defeated 



Defeated 
Approved 

Approved 
Approved 



ATT. SEN. 

APPROVAL 



Insertion of Warrant Article (35 days) Defeated 
General Bylaw Amendment 

Expansion/Portion of 1 Stevens Street Approved 

Expansion/Portion of 15 Stevens Street Approved 

Assisted Living Facility Withdrawn 

Heffron Right-of-Way Approved 
Amended (see article motion) 

Senior Citizen Tax Voucher Program Approved 
$50,000 

Historical Commission Name Change Approved 
General Bylaw Amendment 

Discontinue Carmel Road at High Street Approved 

Approved 



Planning Board - Associate Member 
Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

Planning Board - Membership 
Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

Center Street Sidewalk 
Bonding $45,000 



Approved 
Approved 
Defeated 



Chestnut Street Sidewalk 
Selectmen/School Committee Membership Defeated 
Sewer Line/Pilgrim Drive-Pioneer Cir. Approved 

Approved 



Friendly Visitor Program 
$5,000 

Adult Use 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

Max Height Required IG,IA/ID District 
Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

Topping Road Transfer 

Sequencing of Warrant Articles 
General Bylaw Amendment 

Boundary - County Road 

Real Estate Tax Levy Limit 



Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 
Defeated 

Approved 
Withdrawn 



August 3,1996 

August 3, 1996 
August 3, 1996 



August 3, 1996 
August 3, 1996 



115 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 8.9.10.11 1996 



WAR RA NT 
ART. NO. 

77 



78 
79 

80 

81 

82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 

88 
89 



&CHPH 

DESCRIPTION XAKEU 

MVRT transportation Approved 
$52,000 

Town Meeting Warrant Defeated 

Convenience Store Defeated 
Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

Crystal Circle Agreement Approved 

Rezone Poor Street Defeated 
Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

Accumulated Employee Benefit Account Withdrawn 

NEWSC Agreement Withdrawn 

Change Term of Moderator Withdrawn 

Recall Procedures Defeated 

Relocation River Road Entrance/Digital Approved 



ATT. GEN. 
APPROVAL 



Haverhill Street SRA 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment 

Haverhill Street SRB 

Kennel Licenses 

General Bylaw Amendment 



Approved August 3, 1996 



Withdrawn 
Approved 



August 3, 1996 



P 

■ 

P 

P 
* 

|P 



116 



91 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 25. 1996 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 4, 1996 the Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated 
polling place. All eight precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, are to 
vote at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY-FIFTH DAY OF MARCH, 1996 

at eight o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 
have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes 
stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each 
school house and in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually posted 
and by publication in the Andover Townsman. . Said Warrants have been posted and published 
fourteen days. 

Ronald F. Ford 
Constable 

ARTICLE 1 . Took up Article One and proceeded to vote Town Offices. The ballot boxes 
were found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and 
closed at eight o'clock P.M. 

The total number of ballots cast was 3,543, viz: 

Prec. 1 - 483 Prec. 2 - 424 Prec 3 - 459 Prec. 4 - 482 

Prec. 5-459 Prec. 6-411 Prec. 7 - 394 Prec. 8-431 



1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 MODERATOR 

364 297 335 360 303 293 273 297 James D. Doherty 2522 

82 101 94 90 114 93 71 98 John Doyle 743 

2 1110 1 All Others 6 
35 26 30 31 41 24 50 35 BLANKS 272 

SELECTMEN 

360 305 335 333 320 290 259 284 William T. Downs 2486 

10 7 16 12 4 6 9 14 All Others 78 

113 112 108 137 135 115 126 133 BLANKS 979 



117 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 8. 1996 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

181 170 199 221 155 162 113 162 Richard R. Muller 1363 

6 7 6 7 8 7 11 4 Timothy M. McCarron 56 

293 238 250 246 296 237 268 259 Eric J. Nadworny 2087 

10 10 10 2 All Others 5 

294 70424 BLANKS 32 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

366 319 360 346 326 297 266 292 Ronald C. Hajj 2572 

633533 03 All Others 26 

Ml 102 96 131 130 111 128 136 BLANKS 945 



After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said meeting shall stand adjourned by 
virtue of Chapter 39, Section 20 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to April 8 , 1996, at 7:00 
P.M., at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 8. 1996 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1037 voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 7:03 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Rabbi Robert S. Goldstein, Temple Emanuel, 7 Haggetts Pond 
Road, Andover, MA 

Salute to the flag was led by Larry Larsen, Chairman, Board of Selectman. 

The song, America, written by Samuel Francis Smith in 1831 while attending Andover 
Theological Seminary, was sung by Jennifer Powers, a student at Andover High School. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 17 non-voters to the meeting and allow non-voters to be 
escorted to the non voting section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Dunn Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the articles by number and subject matter. 

Selectman, James Barenboim, presented Virginia Cole, 268 Highland Road, with the Outstanding 
Achievement/Community Recycling Award from the Massachusetts Executive Office of 
Environmental Affairs and the Department of Environmental Protection. 



118 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 8. 1996 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectmen for three years, one member of 
the School Committee for three years, one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five 
years. 

All the candidates above were voted for on one ballot on March 25, 1996: 

The polls were open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P. M. 

Town Clerk, Randall L Hanson, declared the successful candidates to be as follows: 

James D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

William T. Downs Selectman for Three Years 

Eric J. Nadworny School Committee for Three Years 

Ronald C. Hajj Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Edwin Riedel, 1 1 Princeton, Avenue, 
be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report. Approval 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and by Tom Urbelis, Town Counsel, and duly seconded it was VOTED that 
the Town Moderator's salary be as follows: 

Town Moderator - $125.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $30.00 for 

each Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the 

Annual Town Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the salaries of other Town Officers be 
established as follows: 

Selectmen- Chairman- $1,500.00 

Members- $1,200.00 
School Committee - Chairman - $1,500.00 

Members- $1,200.00 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will raise 
and appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of 
the Town, including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal Year 
beginning July 1, 1996, and ending June 30, 1997. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money: 



119 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 8. 1996 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Including $134,600 in Community 
Services receipts, $13,800 
in grants and $6,300 
in Wetland filing fees 



Including $172,400 in 
Community Services 
receipts and $500 
in Wetland filing fees 

Total Appropriated 



$2,500,644.00 

1,210,988.00 
3,711,632.00 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

Including $60,102 from rental 

income and $35,000 from 

Cemetery interest income and 

$30,000 from sale of lots 1,878,812.00 



Including $11,898 from 
rental income 

Total Appropriated 



2,202,309.00 
4,081,121.00 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Including $210,000 from 
ambulance receipts and 
$28,606 from parking meter 
receipts and $41,000 from 
Federal and State grants 



7,236,710.00 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $90,000 for 
from ambulance receipts 
and $15,400 from parking 
meter receipts 

Total Appropriated 



548,910.00 
7,785,620.00 



7 PERSONAL SERVICES 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Total Appropriated 



2,244,320.00 

5,791,800.00 
8,036,120.00 



10 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



LIBBAEX 

Including $66,422 from 
Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium 

Including $49,805 from State 
Library Aid and $32,300 from 
Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium 

Total Appropriated 



1,238,029.00 

505,077.00 
1,743,106.00 



120 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL I OWN MKETING APRIL 8. 1996 

UNCLASSIFIED 

11 COMPENSATION FUND 53 6,000.00 

12 RESERVE FUND 200,000.00 

Total Appropriated 736,000.00 

ANDOVER PDBLIC SCHOOLS 

The following motion was made and seconded to approve the School 
Budget as follow; 

13 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $20,000 in 

Medicaid Receipts 23,887,885.00 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 5,504,896.00 

Total Appropriated 29,392,781.00 
The motion was disapproved by a Majority Vote 
YES: 416 No: 440 

The following motion was then made and seconded and app roved by a 
Majority Vote: 

13 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $20,000 in 

Medicaid Receipts 23,586,583.00 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 5,329,417.00 

Total Appropriated 28,916,000.00 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

15 Total Appropriated 188,528.00 



EIXEB 

16 INTEREST EXPENSE 3,339,227.00 

17 BOND REDEMPTION® 5,122,700.00 

18 STABILIZATION FUND 60,000.00 

19 INSURANCE EXPENSES 615,000.00 

20 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION -0- 

21 RETIREMENT - PERSONAL SERVICES 40,415.00 

22 RETIREMENT - OTHER EXPENSES 51,385.00 

23 CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 2,568,879.00 

24 NON-CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 78,000.00 

25 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 3,325,000.00 

©Including $50,000 from 
parking meter receipts for 
bond redemption 

Total Appropriated 15,200,606.00 

TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION $70,398,733.00 

Finance Committee Report: Approval of amended motion 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval of amended motion 
School Committee's Report: Approval of moved motion 



121 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 8. 1996 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 

Article 9 Free Cash For FY 97 Budget $ 1,500,000 

TOTAL 1,500,000 
SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 



Transfer from: 
Article 5 Debt Services - Interest Expense 

And be appropriated to: 

Debt Service - Bond Redemption 



$ 450,000 



$450,000 
TOTAL $450,000 



Article 27 Transfer from: 

Water Enterprise Fund 

And be appropriated to: 

Repairing Water Tanks 

Article 43 Transfer from: 

Article 28, 1984 Annual Town Meeting 

And be appropriated to: 
Dispatch Center 

Article 69 Transfer from: 

Article 17, 1973 Annual Town Meeting 
Article 21, 1984 Annual Town Meeting 

And be appropriated to: 

Sewer-Pilgrim Drive/Pioneer Circle 



$250,000 



$250,000 



$5,608.82 



$5,608.82 



$ 23,669.33 

121,330.67 

$145,000.00 

$145,000.00 



RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 



HOME 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 



Article 


23 


Article 


24 


Article 


25 


Article 


26 


Article 


28 


Article 


44 


Article 


45 


Article 


47 


Article 


53 


Article 


66 



Andover High School Construction $ 2,426,552 

Water Distribution Improvements 2,050,000 

Storm Drain Improvements 300,000 

Road Improvements 500,000 
Engineering Services 

Land Fill Closure 125,000 

West Middle School Roof 150,000 

Memorial Hall HVAC Improvements 250,000 

Shawsheen Field Improvements 189,000 

Conservation Fund Appropriation 1,000,000 

Center Street Sidewalk 45.000 

TOTAL $ 7,035,552 



UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 



HOME 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 
Article 12 Unpaid Bills 



347.61 



122 



Article 


43 


Article 


54 


Article 


61 


Article 


70 


Article 


77 



Article 


16 


Article 


17 


Article 


18 


Article 


19 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRILS, 1996 



Dispatch Center 114,391.18 

Conservation Land Improvement 25,000.00 

Senior Citizen Tax Voucher 50,000.00 

Friendly Visitor Program 5,000.00 

MVRTA Transportation 52 .000.00 

TOTAL $ 246,738.79 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS FOR FY 1996 BUDGET 
SUPPLEMENT 

Article 6 School Department - Special $ 421,095 

Education 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53% REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 

Department of Community Services $ 150,000 

Community Development & Planning 20,000 

Municipal Maintenance 30,000 

Council on Aging 200.000 

$ 400,000 



A true record 
ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at 
the April 10, 1995 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 33B 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the sum of 
$450,000 be transferred from the following appropriations: 

Debt Services - Interest Expense 

And be appropriated to the following: 

Debt Service - Bond Redemption 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds to the Andover 
School Department budget the amount of $500,000 to meet unanticipated costs, associated with 
special education placements, not contained in the FY- 1996 School Department budget. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 6 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $421,095 from available funds. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report : Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



123 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 8. 1996 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any 
funds allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the 
U. S. Government under any State or Federal grant program. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 7 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant by a Majority vole. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a 
contract with the Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners, the County 
Commissioners and/or either of them for the construction and maintenance of public highways in 
the Town of Andover for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 8 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 9. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash 
to reduce the Fiscal Year 1997 tax rate and to effect appropriations voted at the 1996 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 9 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of 1,5000,000 by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board Selectmen of Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 10. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free 
cash in the treasury. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 1 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway 
Construction. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 1 1 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum not to exceed 
$10,000 to pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior Fiscal Years. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 12 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $347.61 from available funds for an unpaid bill to Lawrence General 
Hospital. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 4/5 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

124 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 8. 1996 

ARTICLE 13. To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 13 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board Selectmen of Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of 
the Acts of 1986 as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property 
tax exemption for Fiscal Year 1 997 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions 
under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 14 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report : Approval 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior 
Town Meetings or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Community Services revolving 
account for ticket sales, related trip expenses and youth activities for Fiscal Year 1997; such 
expenses to be funded by revenues collected from these activities, and to authorize the Town 
Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $150,000 for FY- 1997, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 16 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant not to exceed $150,000 for fiscal 1997. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Community Development and 
Planning revolving account for expenses charged for advertising or legal hearings and/or legal 
notices associated with permit applications and for expenses charged for health clinic fees for the 
Building, Health, Conservation and Planning divisions of said department for Fiscal Year 1997; 
such expenses to be funded by fees collected from applicants and clinic participants, and to 
authorize the Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $20,000 for Fiscal 
Year 1997 or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 17 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant not to exceed $20,000 for fiscal 1997. 

Finance Committee Report. Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/i for the purpose of establishing a Department of Municipal 
Maintenance revolving account for field maintenance and related expenses for Fiscal Year 1997, 
such expenses to be funded by revenues collected by field rentals, and to authorize the Town 



125 



Manager lo make expenditures in nn amount not to exceed $30,000 for FY- 1 997, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 18 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant not to exceed $30,000 for fiscal 1997 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Council on Aging revolving 
account for expenses related to the Adult Day Care Program, Meals-on- Wheels Program and 
other Senior activities and programs of said department for Fiscal Year 1997; such expenses to be 
funded by fees collected from participants, and to authorize the Town Manager to make 
expenditures in an amount not to exceed $200,000 for Fiscal Year 1997 or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 18 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant not to exceed $200,000 for fiscal 1997. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. 
Chapter 30B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager, in his capacity as chief procurement 
officer, to solicit and award contracts for terms exceeding three years, including any renewal, 
extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term is determined to be in the best 
interest of the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or take any other action related thereto. 

A motion was made to approve Article 20 as printed in the Warrant. 

A substitute motion was moved and seconded to authorize to the Town to advertise and award a 
contract for the collection and disposal of solid waste for a time not to exceed 5 years. 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was passed by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 413 NO: 401 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to accept grants of easements for water drainage, sewage disposal and utility purposes 
on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or 
take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 21 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectman Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



126 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



April 9. 1996 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to grant easements for water drainage, sewage disposal and utility purposes on terms 
and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 22 as printed in the 
Warrant. 



VOTE: 



YES: 799 



NO: 8 



A 2/3 vote required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $2,839,145, or 
any other sum, in addition to all sums previously appropriated for the same purpose, for 
remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to Andover High School, and for 
constructing, equipping and furnishing additions thereto, including costs incidental and related to 
the project, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $2,426,552 be hereby 
appropriated, in addition to all sums previously appropriated for the same purpose, for 
remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to Andover High School, and for 
constructing, originally equipping and furnishing additions thereto, including costs incidental and 
related to the project, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $2,426,552 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7(3) and (3 A), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, which may include 
Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948, as amended, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

After discussion a motion was made to move the question and close debate. 

Vote: Yes: 836 No: 14 A 2/3 vote required 



The original motion was then voted: 



VOTE: 



YES: 756 



NO: 106 A 2/3 vote required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:10 P.M. , until 

Tuesday, April 9, 1996 at 7:00 P.M. at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High School, Shawsheen 

Road. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 9. 1996 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 642 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:05 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit 1 8 non-voters to the meeting and to escort non- 
voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 



127 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9. 1996 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $2,050,000 for 
the purpose of laying and relaying water mains of not less than six inches but not more than 
sixteen inches in diameter and for costs incidental and related thereto, including the acquisition of 
any easements required in connection therewith, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the sum of $2,050,000 be hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of laying and relaying water mains of not less than six inches but not 
more than sixteen inches in diameter and for costs incidental and related thereto, including the 
acquisition of any easements required in connection therewith, and that to raise this appropriation, 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $2,050,000 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8(5), of the General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 306 NO: A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

School Committee Report Approval 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $300,000 for the 
purpose of installing storm drains; and to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary 
easements by purchase, by gift or taking by right of eminent domain, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the sum of $300,000 be hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of installing storm drains, including costs incidental or related 
thereto; and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $300,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1), of 
the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor, and that the Selectmen are authorized to acquire the necessary easements by purchase, 
by gift or by taking by right of eminent domain. 

VOTE: YES: 328 NO: A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $500,000 to 
supplement funds received from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for highway purposes, for 
constructing or reconstructing public ways with permanent pavement, including costs incidental 
or related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the sum of $500,000 be hereby 
appropriated to supplement funds received from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
highway purposes, for constructing or reconstructing public ways with permanent pavement, 
including costs incidental or related thereto, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $500,000 under and 



128 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



April 9. 1996 



pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(5), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor 



VOTE: 



YES: 339 



NO:0 



A 2/3 vole required 



Finance Committee Report Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer from available funds, enterprise 
funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $250,000 
for the purpose of repainting the steel water tanks on Holt Hill and Wood Hill, or take any other 
action related thereto 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town raise 
$250,000 by transfer from water enterprise funds and appropriate the sum of $250,000 for the 
purpose of repainting the steel water tanks on Holt Hill and Wood Hill. 

Finance Committee Report Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $125,000 for 
performing a comprehensive engineering study and site assessment/evaluation of the Chandler 
Road landfill, including costs incidental or related thereto, or take any other action related thereto 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the sum of $125,000 be hereby 
appropriated for engineering services for the preparation of plans and specifications for a capital 
project, including a comprehensive engineering study and site assessment/evaJuation of the 
Chandler Road landfill, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approvaJ of the 
Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $125,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7(22), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor. 



VOTE: YES: 351 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: ApprovaJ 



NO:0 



A 2/3 vote required 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Acorn Drive, as 
shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision 
Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale: 1" = 100', Date: January 15, 1991, Owner & 
Applicant: Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass., Surveyor: 
Andover Consultants, Inc., One East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded with 
Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 



Article 29 was WITHDRAWN 



NOT LAID OUT 



129 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9. 1996 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Basswood 
Lane, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive 
Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale: 1" = 100', Date: January 15, 1991, 
Owner & Applicant. Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass., 
Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., One East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is 
recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

Article 30 was WITHDRAWN NOT LAID OUT 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Hazelwood 
Circle, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive 
Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100', Date: January 15, 1991, 
Owner & Applicant: Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass., 
Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., One East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is 
recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 
Article 3 1 was WITHDRAWN NOT LAID OUT 



ARTICLE 32. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Avery Lane as shown on 
a plan entitled, "Definitive Plan of Quailcrest, Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. of 
Open Space," dated June 12, 1986, revised October 1, 1986, Scale 1" = 100', Engineers: Dana F. 
Perkins & Assoc, Inc., recorded at Essex North District Registry of Deeds, Plan No. 10580. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 32 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 33. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Atwood Lane as shown 
on a plan entitled, "Definitive Plan of Quailcrest, Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. of 
Open Space," dated June 12, 1986, revised October 1, 1986, Scale 1" = 100', Engineers: Dana F. 
Perkins & Assoc, Inc., recorded at Essex North District Registry of Deeds, Plan No. 10580. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 33 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 34. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Stoneybrook Circle as 
shown on a plan entitled, "Definitive Plan of Quailcrest, Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, 
Mass. of Open Space," dated June 12, 1986, revised October 1, 1986, Scale 1" = 100', Engineers: 
Dana F. Perkins & Assoc, Inc., recorded at Essex North District Registry of Deeds, Plan No. 

10580. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell and others 



130 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9. 1996 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 34 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a Public Way, Coventry Lane, 
as shown on a plan which was approved by the Planning Board, said Plan being shown on a plan 
of land entitled "Definitive Subdivision Plan of Land 'Ashley Place' Andover, Massachusetts, 
dated March 1, 1993, Dana F. Perkins, Inc. Consulting Engineers & Land Surveyors. Owners: 
Paula Gronquist/Marjorie Dimlich/David Dimlich", which plan is recorded at the Essex North 
Registry of Deeds as Plan 12266. 

On petition of George A. Rand and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 35 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report : Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 36. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Molly Road as shown on 
a plan entitled "As-Built Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts "Molly Road" Scale: 1 " = 40' 
Date: November 7, 1995, Dana F. Perkins, Inc." A copy of said plan is on file with the Office of 
the Town Clerk pursuant to MGL Ch. 82, Sec. 23. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 36 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Preston Circle, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision 
Plan 'Preston Circle' " Andover, Mass. Scale: 1" = 40' Date: May 12, 1994, Owner & Applicant: 
AL-JO Realty Trust c/o Atty. Richard Asoian, 12 Essex Street, Andover, MA 01810, Surveyor: 
Andover Consultants, Inc., One East River Place, Methuen, Mass. 01844", which plan is recorded 
with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12444. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 37 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will accept the remaining portion of Windemere Drive 
running from Robinswood Way to the end of the cul-de-sac marking the northerly end of 
Windemere Drive all as shown on a subdivision plan entitled: "Definitive Plan Sunnyside Acres, 
Andover, Mass. Owner: Theodore Realty Trust, Engineer: Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc., 
Scale 1" = 40', Date: September 20, 1973", and said plan is filed with the North Essex Registry 
of Deeds as Plan #7129, and as shown on subdivision plan entitled: "Definitive Subdivision Plan 

131 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9. 1996 

of Land Sunnyside Acres, Andover, Mass. Owner: Theodore Realty Trust, Engineer: Kaminski 
Gelinas & Assoc, Inc., Scale 1" = 40', Date: January 27, 1983", and said plan is filed with the 
North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #9142. 

On petition of Mark Ford, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 38 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $55,000 for 
required improvements to David Drive to meet Town standards, including costs incidental and 
related thereto; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by 
purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will take by eminent domain and accept as a public way a 
street known as "David Drive" as shown on a plan entitled Pendleton Estates, prepared by 
Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc., dated August 1975, said plan being recorded in the North 
Essex Registry of Deeds as plan number 7863. 

On petition of Theodore Primes and others 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not to 
exceed $4,000 for the first year's operation, and to require that, henceforth, all meetings of the 
Finance Committee of the Town of Andover, including executive sessions, shall be recorded 
officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means of sonic reproduction, 
from the resulting recordings of which transcriptions shall be made, such recordings and 
transcripts to be preserved in perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and transcripts shall be 
made available to the public as soon as possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 4 1 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not to 
exceed $4,000 for the first year's operation, and to require that, henceforth, all regular and special 
meetings of the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover, including executive sessions, shall 
be recorded officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means of sonic 
reproduction, from the resulting recordings of which transcripts shall be made, such recordings 
and transcripts to be preserved in perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and the transcripts 
shall be made available to the public as soon as possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 42 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

132 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL I OWN MEETING April 9. 1996 

ARTICLE 43 To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $300,000 for the 
purpose of replacing the radio equipment in the Dispatch Center which serves the communication 
needs of the Police, Fire and Public Works Departments, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
$5,608.82 from Article 28, 1984 Annual Town Meeting and $1 14,391.18 from available funds 
and appropriate the sum of $120,000 for the purpose of replacing the equipment in the Dispatch 
Center which serves the communication needs of the Police, Fire and Public Works departments. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $150,000 for the 
purpose of replacing the roof in the West Middle School Gymnasium, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the sum of $150,000 be hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of replacing the roof of the West Middle School Gymnasium, and 
that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow $150,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3 A), of the General 
Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 452 NO: A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $250,000 for the 
purpose of upgrading and improving the HVAC system at the Memorial Hall Library, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the sum of $250,000 be hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of upgrading and improving the HVAC system at the Memorial Hall 
Library, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $250,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3 A), 
of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 447 NO: 1 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to change the use of the Essex Gravel Pit off 
Andover Street and Woburn Street as shown on Assessors Map 1 1 7, Lots 1 5 and 22 from 
conservation purposes to recreation purposes, including but not limited to playing fields and 
necessary improvements for such playing fields and to transfer custody and control from the 
Conservation Commission to the Board of Selectmen and to authorize the Town Manager and 
Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation to accomplish the 
foregoing or take any other action related thereto. 



133 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9. 1996 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 46 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 477 NO: 12 A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate $189,000 for improvements 
at upper and lower Shawsheen fields including refurbishing the track, paving upper Shawsheen 
with barrier, lighting and water for ice skating, play structure and picnic tables, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the sum of $189,000 be hereby 
appropriated for the development of improvements at upper and lower Shawsheen fields, 
including reconstructing the track, paving upper Shawsheen with barrier, lighting and water for 
ice skating, play structure and picnic tables, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $189,000 under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(25), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 528 NO: 2 A 2/3 vote is required 



Finance Committee Report Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
gift, purchase or taking by eminent domain the property at 35 Elm Street, shown on Assessors 
Map 39, Lot 16, together with the improvements thereon for municipal purposes, and to raise by 
taxation, borrowing or transfer from available funds or any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate the sum of $1 75,000 for said acquisition, or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $75,000 for the 
purpose of designing, engineering and constructing a municipal parking lot at 35 Elm Street (Map 
39, Lot 16) including costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to add to the General Bylaws of the Town of 
Andover a requirement that developers, builders or their agents will henceforth pay a 
developmental impact fee prior to receiving building permits for construction of new buildings in 
Andover. Such fees, made payable to the Town of Andover, may be used only for the protection 
of open space and the acquisition and maintenance of land for conservation purposes. 



134 



I 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9, 1996 

Developmental impact fees will be $10,000 (Ten thousand dollars) per dwelling unit, or seven 
percent (7%) of the estimated total construction cost of new buildings, whichever is greater. 
Permits for restoration or renovation of existing buildings are exempt from developmental impact 
fees. 

On petition of Joseph E. O'Brien and others 

Article 50 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 113 NO: 401 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to adopt an amendment to its Zoning Bylaw, Article 
7, Section VI, Rate of Development, set forth below: 

"Building permits for the construction of dwellings on lots held in common ownership on 
the effective date of this provision shall not be granted at a rate per annum greater than as 
permitted by the following schedule commencing in the year such lots are subdivided or in 
the year this provision becomes effective, whichever is later. 

For such lots containing a total area of land sufficient to provide more than ten dwellings 
at the maximum density permitted for the District in which such lots are located; one tenth 
of the number of dwellings permitted to be constructed or placed on said total area of land 
based on said maximum permitted density. 

For such lots containing a total area of land insufficient to provide ten or more dwellings 
at the maximum density permitted under these Bylaws for the District in which such lots 
are located; one dwelling. 

Any lots in a subdivision covered by this provision hereafter sold or otherwise transferred 
to another owner shall include in the deed the earliest date on which construction may be 
commenced in accordance with these provisions." 

and to direct the Town Clerk to insert these provisions at the appropriate place in the Bylaw and 
to assign a number in sequential order therein; or act on anything relative thereto. 

On petition of James Loscu toff and others 

Article 51 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 144 NO: 383 A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by inserting 
the following new section: 

In the Town of Andover, no new residential building shall be constructed for a period of 
six months from the date of approval of this section by the Massachusetts Attorney 
General, or August 1, 1996, whichever date is the longer period of time. During this time, 
the Town of Andover Zoning Board shall conduct comprehensive planning studies to 
determine whether and to what extent the Town's Master Plan needs to be revised. The 



135 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9. 1996 

Zoning Board may include in these studies consideration of rezoning, limiting the number 
of housing permits and the adoption of impact fees. The six-month moratorium is 
necessary to protect ill-advised development pending revision of the Master Plan. 

On petition of James Loscutoff, Jr. and others 

Article 52 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 22 NO: 409 A 2/3 vote required 



Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $1,000,000 for 
the acquisition of land for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted the sum of $1,000,000 be hereby appropriated 
for the acquisition of land for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 
8C, of the Massachusetts General Laws, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $1,000,000 under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7(3), of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 382 NO: 47 A 2/3 vote required 



Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Conservation Commission: Approval 



ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $25,000 for the 
improvement of Conservation Land under the custody and control of the Conservation 
Commission, under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 54 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $25,000 from available funds. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Conservation Commission: Approval 



ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to transfer custody and control to the Board of 
Selectmen to sell or otherwise convey to the City of Lawrence, Massachusetts, for consideration 
of ONE DOLLAR ($1 .00) all of the Town's right, title and interest in and to a certain sewer 
easement located in the City of Lawrence which was conveyed to the Town by the City of 
Lawrence on August 4, 1975 by grant recorded in North Essex Registry of Deeds in Book 1264, 
Page 599, being more particularly described as a certain 50 foot sewer easement shown on two 
parcels on a plan entitled "Plan Showing Takings for Sewer Easements, Lawrence, Mass., Scale: 
1" = 40', January 22, 1974, Harry R. Feldman, Inc., Land Surveyors", recorded in North Essex 
Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 7263, the said parcels being further described as follows: 



136 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9. 1996 

Parcel 1 : A fifty foot sewer easement shown as PS-45A on said plan. 

Parcel 2 : A fifty foot sewer easement being a portion of PS-45 on said plan, said fifty foot sewer 
easement being bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at the Northeast corner of PS-45 A; thence running generally Westerly 51 feet, 
more or less, to the Northwest corner of said PS-45 A, thence turning and running N. 21 ° 
40' 23" W., 403 feet, more or less, to a point in the Southerly bound of a 30 foot 
permanent easement; thence turning and running S. 73° 54' 23" E., 64.00 feet more or 
less, to a point in the line of said 30 foot permanent easement; thence turning and running 
376 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning; 

or to take any other act in relation thereto. 

On petition of Arthur J. McCabe and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town will vote to transfer custody 
and control to the Board of Selectmen to sell or otherwise convey to the City of Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, for consideration of ONE DOLLAR ($1.00) all of the Town's right, title and 
interest in and to a certain sewer easement located in the City of Lawrence which was conveyed 
to the Town by the City of Lawrence on August 4, 1 975 by grant recorded in North Essex 
Registry of Deeds in Book 1264, Page 599, being more particularly described as a certain 50 foot 
sewer easement shown on two parcels on a plan entitled "Plan Showing Takings for Sewer 
Easements, Lawrence, Mass., Scale: 1" = 40', January 22, 1974, Harry R. Feldman, Inc., Land 
Surveyors", recorded in North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 7263, the said parcels being 
further described as follows: 

Parcel 1 : A fifty foot sewer easement shown as PS-45A on said plan. 

Parcel 2 : A fifty foot sewer easement being a portion of PS-45 on said plan, said fifty foot sewer 
easement being bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at the Northeast corner of PS-45 A; thence running generally Westerly 51 feet, 
more or less, to the Northwest corner of said PS-45 A; thence turning and running N. 21 ° 
40' 23" W., 403 feet, more or less, to a point in the Southerly bound of a 30 foot 
permanent easement; thence turning and running S. 73° 54' 23" E., 64.00 feet more or 
less, to a point in the line of said 30 foot permanent easement; thence turning and running 
376 feet "S21 degrees 40' 23" E, more or less, to the point of beginning; 



or to take any other act in relation thereto. 



VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to require that the following sentence be deleted 
from the General Bylaws of the Town of Andover, Article II, Section 2.: 

"The warrant for the Annual Town Meeting shall be open for the insertion of Articles for a 
period of not less than thirty-five (35) consecutive calendar days." 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 56 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

137 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9. 1996 



ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to accept the expansion of the existing layout for a 
portion of Stevens Street to fifty (50) feet which layout expansion is more fully depicted on a plan 
entitled "Plan Showing Alteration of Layout for a Portion of 1 Stevens Street" dated January 12, 
1996, prepared by Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. (VHB) and filed with the Town Clerk; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Town authorize the 
Board of Selectman to accept a grant of land for the purposes of expanding the existing layout of 
a portion of Stevens Street to 50 feet, at no cost to the Town and upon the terms and conditions 
which the Board deems in the best interest of the Town, which layout expansion involves strips of 
land on the north and south side of Stevens Street totaling approximately 3,400 square feet to be 
depicted on a plan of land duly recorded with the Registry of Deeds and acceptable to the Board; 
or take any other action relative thereto. 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to accept the expansion of the existing layout for a 
portion of Stevens Street to fifty (50) feet which layout expansion is more fully depicted on a plan 
entitled "Plan Showing Alteration of Layout for a Portion of 15 Stevens Street" dated January 12, 
1996, prepared by Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. (VHB) and filed with the Town Clerk; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Town authorize 
the Board of Selectman to accept a grant of land for purposes of expanding the existing layout of 
a portion of Stevens Street to 50 feet, at no cost to the Town and upon the terms and conditions 
which the Board deems in the best interest of the Town, which layout expansion involves strips of 
land on the north and south side of Stevens Street totaling approximately 6,500 square feet to be 
depicted on a plan of land duly recorded with the Registry of Deeds and acceptable to the Board; 
or take any other action relative thereto. 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII of the 
Town Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) By adding a new subsection IV.B.5A. to read as follows: 

"IV.B. SRA SRB SRC APT LS OP GB MU IG IA ID 
PB PB PB N N N PB PB N N N 

5A. Assisted Living Facility, subject to the provisions of Section VI.U. of this Bylaw." 

(2) By adding a new subsection VI.U. to read as follows: 

"VI.U. Assisted Living Facility (as per Section IV, Subsection B, of this bylaw). 

1 . Applicability: The Planning Board may grant a special permit for an Assisted Living 

Facility for the following types of structures and uses: (1) conversion or expansion of 

138 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 9. 1996 

existing nonresidential structures to an Assisted Living Facility; or (2) new Assisted Living 
Facility construction. 

2. Density: The Maximum allowable density shall be determined by calculating the required 
lot area per dwelling unit as follows: 

One thousand five hundred (1,500) square feet of lot area per dwelling unit. 

3. Dimensional Requirements: 

(1) Building height: Any addition or new construction shall not exceed the maximum 
height allowed by the Table of Dimensional Requirements, Section V, Subsection 
A, of this bylaw. 

(2) Building coverage: 

(a) In a General Business District, an existing structure occupying more than 
two-thirds (2/3) of the lot area shall not be expanded; new structures shall 
not exceed two-thirds (2/3) of the lot area. 

(b) Maximum building coverage shall not exceed forty percent (40%) in all 
other Districts. 

(3) Building setbacks: 

(a) In a Mixed Use District, new construction or building expansion shall be 
set back twenty (20) feet from all property lines. 

(b) In a General Business District, building setbacks shall be determined in 
accordance with Section V, Subsection B, Paragraph 2d, of this bylaw. 

(c) In all other Districts, new construction or building expansion shall be 
setback as required in the Table of Dimensional Requirements, Section V, 
Subsection A, of this bylaw. 

(4) Minimum lot frontage: 

(a) In a Mixed Use District only, the lot shall have a minimum frontage of fifty 
(SO) feet on an existing public way. 

(b) In all other Districts, the lot shall have minimum frontage as required by the 
Table of Dimensional Requirements, Section V, Subsection A of this 
bylaw. 

(5) Setbacks from residential buildings: 

(a) No building in a General Business District shall be erected within fifteen 
(IS) feet of a residential building. 

(b) In all other Districts, no structure shall be constructed nearer than fifty (SO) 
feet from the outside wall of an existing residential dwelling. 

4. Town Services: 

(1) The lot shall have frontage on an existing public way with sufficient capacity to 
safely accommodate the projected traffic volume; 

(2) There shall be town water and sewer available with sufficient capacity to serve the 
project. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 9, 1996 

5. Design Standards: 

(1) Access: Parking lot driveways shall not provide access onto Main Street unless 
granted a special permit by the Planning Board in accordance with Section VI, 
Subsection A, Paragraph 9a. 

(2) Parking requirements: 

(a) There shall be one ( 1 ) parking space for every two (2) dwelling units. 

(b) For mixed use developments in a Mixed Use District, the parking required 
for each use shall be calculated and added to the total. 

(c) The required number of parking spaces on a common lot may be reduced if 
it can be shown that the parking needs for the uses are such that a lower 
total will serve all uses adequately. The Planning Board shall use the 
criteria under Section VI, Subsection A, Paragraph 9c(l) of this bylaw in 
its review of the proposed parking alternative(s) 

(3) The balance of the Design Standards contained in Section VI.0.3.g(3) through (9) 
shall apply, except that the provisions contained in VI.0.3.g(8) dealing with open 
area shall apply in all Districts. 

6. Special Permits Procedure: 

(1) Filing of the application: Twelve (12) copies of an application for a special permit 
for Multiple Family-Assisted Living Facility shall be filed with the Planning Board. 

(2) The provisions contained in Section VI. 0.3. h. (2) through (7) shall apply. 

7. Certificate of Occupancy: 

(1) A copy of the certification issued pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 19D for the 

Assisted Living Facility shall be filed with the Planning Department prior to the 
issuance of a Certificate of Occupancy." 

(3) By adding to Section II the following definition: 

"Multiple Family-Assisted Living Facility - A facility providing services for elderly or disabled 
persons in a residential environment as provided for in M.G.L. Chapter 19D, and certified as such 
under Sections 3 and 4 of M.G.L. Chapter 19D, as amended from time to time." 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the 
Conservation Commission to enter into an Agreement and to ratify any Agreement entered into 
with the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School District and Phillips 
Academy upon terms and conditions the Board and Commission deem to be in the best interest of 
the Town, and to grant and accept easements in real estate and to convey and accept conveyances 
of real estate lying between River Road and the Merrimack River as shown on plans entitled "Plan 
of Land in Andover, Massachusetts" dated April 14, 1995 by Dana F. Perkins, Inc. and 
"Subdivision and Easement Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts" dated April 17, 1995 by 
Dana F. Perkins, Inc. and to authorize such grants, conveyances and acceptances and to authorize 
the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation 
for such real estate grants, conveyances and acceptances or take any other action related thereto. 



140 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 10. 1996 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 60 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

A motion was made and seconded to amend Article 60 by inserting after the words "deem to be in 
the best interests of the Town": provided, however, that no agreement regarding the procedures, 
rules, and/or regulations for management of the property shall be of a term exceeding ten years. 

It was VOTED to approve the motion by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 60 was approved as amended. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10: 10 P.M. , until 
Wednesday, April 10, 1996 at 7:00 P.M. at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High School, 
Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 10. 1996 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 5 1 8 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:04 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit 7 non-voters to the meeting and to escort non-voters 
to the non-voter section thereafter. 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 
the sum of $50,000 for the purpose of providing senior citizens and disabled homeowners with a 
real estate tax payment voucher program pursuant to an agreement to be formulated by the 
Council on Aging and approved by the Town Manager or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 61 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to change the name of The Andover Historical 
Commission to The Andover Preservation Committee and to amend Article XII, Section 33(2)(b) 
of the General Bylaws as follows: 

Delete: The Andover Historical Commission 
Add: The Andover Preservation Commission 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 62 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody and control of a portion 
of land including improvements thereon at High Street and Carmel Road in the Carmel Woods 
Conservation Commission Area, Assessors Map 20, Lot 34, containing approximately 800 square 
feet fronting on High Street, to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of conveying said land to 
William and Eileen Walsh in exchange for the conveyance of a portion of land including 



1A1 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 10. 1996 

improvements thereon at 109 High Street, Assessors Map 20, Lot 35, containing approximately 
800 square feet, which shall be under the care, custody and control of the Conservation 
Commission and to authorize the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to petition the General 
Court for special legislation authorizing said conveyances or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the care, 
custody and control of a portion of land including improvements thereon at High Street and 
Carmel Road in the Carmel Woods Conservation Commission Area, Assessors Map 20, Lot 34, 
containing approximately 250 square feet fronting on High Street, to the Board of Selectmen for 
purposes of conveying said land to William and Eileen Walsh in exchange for the conveyance of a 
portion of land including improvements thereon at 109 High Street, Assessors Map 20, Lot 35, 
containing approximately 250 square feet, which shall be under the care, custody and control of 
the Conservation Commission and to authorize the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to 
petition the General Court for special legislation authorizing said conveyances or take any other 
action related thereto. 

VOTE: YES: 287 NO: 5 A 2/3 vote required 

(NOTE: 250 square feet was substituted in the floor motion for 800 square feet) 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission: Approval 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VIII. C.2. of the Zoning Bylaw by 
adding the following subsection: 

e. Planning Board Associate Member. To assist in carrying out its duties as a Special Permit 
Granting Authority, there shall be one (1) associate member of the Planning Board appointed by 
the Town Manager under authority of Chapter 40A, Section 9. The associate member shall sit on 
the Planning Board for the purposes of acting at special permit application hearings in case of 
absence, inability to act, or conflict of interest on the part of any member of the Planning Board, 
or in the event of a vacancy on the Board, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 64 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to amend the first line of Article III, Section 3(b)(1) 
of the General Bylaws to read as follows: 

( I ) Membership. The Planning Board shall consist of five (5) members, and one (1) associate 
member, appointed by the . . ., or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 65 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $45,000 for 
reconstructing a section of Center Street in order to reduce the width of the pavement and 
construct a new sidewalk with granite curb on the west side of the street from house #5 to #15, 
including costs incidental or related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Perry Raffi and others 

142 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 10. 1996 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $45,000 be hereby 
appropriated for reconstructing a section of Center Street in order to reduce the width of the 
pavement and to construct a new sidewalk with granite curb on the west side of the street from 
house #5 to #15, including costs incidental or related thereto, and that to raise this appropriation, 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $45,000 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(5), of the General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes oflhc Town therefor 

VOTE: YES: 247 NO: 88 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: No Position 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $100,000 for the 
purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on Chestnut Street 
from Upland Road to Highland Road and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain such land as may be required for this 
sidewalk; or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Emilie Gilbert and others 

Article 67 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 164 NO: 226 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: No Position 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to direct the Board of Selectmen to appropriately 
amend the Town Bylaws and any other affected documents to provide for the election of seven 
(total) members for the Andover Board of Selectmen and seven (total) members for the Andover 
School Committee. 

The selectmen in office at the time of said election shall continue in office until the end of 
their elected terms. 

Said elections to take place at the first annual Andover Town election subsequent to the 
formal adoption of this new requirement. 

The election procedures shall reflect the earliest attainment of future 2, 2 and 3 candidate 
elections. 

On petition of William J. Coderre and other 

Article 68 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
School Committee Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
$145,000 for the installation of a sanitary sewer line in Pilgrim Drive and the Pioneer Circles. 
Betterments are to be assessed. 

On petition of Marcia Hohn and others 

143 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 10. 1996 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town vote to transfer $23,669.33 
from Article 17, 1973 Annual Town Meeting and $121,330.67 from Article 21, 1984 Annual 
Town Meeting and appropriate the sum of $145,000 for the installation of a sanitary sewer line in 
Pilgrim Drive and the Pioneer Circles. Betterments are to be assessed. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vole required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, from available funds, the sum of 
$15,000 (or some lesser amount) and direct that it be used to establish a reliable and ongoing 
"Friendly Visitor Program" for homebound senior citizens in the Town of Andover. 

On petition of M. Rita Cronin and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to approve Article 70 as 
printed in the Warrant in the amount of $5000.00 and to further, to authorize the Town to reduce 
the amount of the appropriation by the amount of any grant or grants that the Town can secure to 
accomplish this purpose. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws by providing for 
regulations governing adult uses as follows: 



a. By adding the following definitions to Section II.: 

30. ADULT BOOKSTORE — An establishment having as a substantial or significant portion of 
its stock in trade, books, magazines, and other matter which are distinguished or characterized by 
their emphasis depicting, describing, or relating to sexual conduct or sexual excitement as defined 
inMGLCh. 272, Sec. 31. 

3 1 . ADULT CABARET — A nightclub, bar, restaurant, tavern, dance hall, or similar commercial 
establishment which regularly features persons or entertainers who appear in a state of nudity, or 
live performances which are distinguished or characterized by nudity, sexual conduct or sexual 
excitement as defined in MGL Ch. 272, Sec. 31. 

32. ADULT MOTION PICTURE THEATER - An enclosed building or any portion thereof 
used for presenting material (motion picture films, video cassettes, cable television, slides or any 
other such visual media) distinguished by an emphasis on matter depicting, describing, or relating 
to sexual conduct or sexual excitement as defined in MGL Ch. 272, Sec. 3 1 . 

33. ADULT PARAPHERNALIA STORE ~ An establishment having as a substantial or 
significant portion of its stock devices, objects, tools, or toys which are distinguished or 
characterized by their association with sexual activity, including sexual conduct or sexual 
excitement as defined in MGL Ch. 272, Sec. 31. 

34. ADULT VIDEO STORE — An establishment having as a substantial or significant portion of 
its stock in trade - for sale or rent - motion picture films, video cassettes, and similar audio/visual 
media, which are distinguished or characterized by their emphasis depicting, describing, or 
relating to sexual conduct or sexual excitement as defined in MGL Ch. 272, Sec. 3 1 . 



144 



I 
I 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 10. 1996 

35. ADULT USE -- Adult Bookstores, Adult Cabarets, Adult Motion Picture Theaters, Adult 
Paraphernalia Stores, and Adult Video Stores as defined in this bylaw 

b. By adding the following section: 

Section VI U Adult Uses The following regulations shall apply to adult uses as defined in 
Section II of this bylaw 

1 Separation Distances: Adult uses may be permitted only when located outside the area 
circumscribed by a circle which has a radius consisting of the following distances from specified 
uses or zoning district boundaries: 

a. Five hundred feet (500') from the district boundary line of any residence zone 
(SRA, SRB, SRC, APT); 

b. Five hundred feet (500') from any other adult use as defined herein; 

c. Three hundred feet (300') from any establishment licensed under MGL Ch. 138, 
Sec. 12. 

2. The radius distance shall be measured by following a straight line from the nearest point of the 
property parcel upon which the proposed adult use is to be located, to the nearest point of the 
parcel of property or the zoning district boundary line from which the proposed adult use is to be 
separated. In the case of the distance between adult uses (section l.b.) and between an adult use 
and an establishment licensed under MGL Ch. 138, Sec. 12 (section I.e.) such distances shall be 
measured between the closest points of the buildings in which such uses are located. 

3. With the exception of an adult cabaret or an adult motion picture theater, adult uses may not 
exceed three thousand five hundred (3,500) square feet of useable floor area. 

4. Parking requirements: The following parking requirements shall apply: 

a. Parking for adult bookstores, adult paraphernalia stores, and adult video stores 

shall meet the requirements of Section VI.A.4.c.(l) of the bylaw. 

b Parking for adult cabarets and adult motion picture theaters shall meet the 

requirements of Section VI.A.4.b.(4) of the bylaw. 

c. Parking shall be provided in the side or rear yard area only. 

d. All parking areas shall be illuminated, and all lighting shall be contained on the 
property. 

e. Parking areas shall be landscaped in conformance with the appropriate provisions 
of the Zoning Bylaw. 

5. Screening and buffering: A five (5) foot wide landscaped buffer shall be provided along the 
side and rear property lines of an adult use establishment consisting of evergreen shrubs or trees 
not less than five (5) feet in height at the time of planting, or a solid fence not less than six (6) feet 
in height. 

6. All building openings, entries and windows shall be screened in such a manner as to prevent 
visual access to the interior of the establishment by the public. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 10. 1996 

7. Application information: The application for a special permit for an adult use establishment 
must include the following information: 

a. Name and address of the legal owner of the establishment; 

b. Name and address of all persons having lawful equity or security interests in the 
establishment; 

c Name and address of the manager; 

d. Number of employees; 

e. Proposed provisions for security within and without the establishment; 
f The physical layout of the interior of the establishment. 

8. No adult use special permit shall be issued to any person convicted of violating the provisions 
of MGL Ch. 1 19, Sec. 63, or MGL Ch. 272, Sec. 28. 

9. An adult use special permit shall only be issued following a public hearing held within sixty- 
five (65) days after the filing of an application with the special permit granting authority, a copy of 
which shall forthwith be given to the Town Clerk by the applicant. 

10. Any adult use special permit issued under this bylaw shall lapse within one (1) year, and 
including such time required to pursue or await the determination of an appeal from the grant 
thereof, if substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced except for good cause or, in the case 
of a permit for construction, if construction has not begun by such date except for good cause. 

1 1 . Any section of this bylaw, or portion thereof, declared invalid shall not affect the validity or 
application of the remainder of the bylaw. 

c. By adding the following to Section IV.B.: 

Business and 

Commercial Uses SRA/SRB/SRC/APT LS OP/GB/MU/IG/IA/1D 

9A Adult Use N BA N 

as defined in 
Section II. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 71 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

A motion was made and seconded to amend Article 71 by adding to Section VI.U. 1 ., the 
following subsection: "d. Fifteen hundred feet (1500') from the boundary of any school." The 
amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

The amended motion was approved: 

VOTE: YES: 397 NO: 49 A 2/3 vote required 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 72. To see if the Town will amend the Town's Zoning Bylaw by amending the Table 
of Dimensional Requirements in Section V(A) to state "60 feet" and "5 stories" as the Maximum 



146 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 10. 1996 

Height in Industrial G, Industrial A and Industrial D Districts, and by adding the following new 
Section V(B)(8)(f): 

f. In the case of a lot located in an Industrial G, Industrial A or Industrial D District, 

the maximum height of a building thereon shall be 5 stories, but not in excess of 60 
occupiable feet or 80 total feet, provided that the space above 60 feet (as height is 
measured in accordance with this Bylaw) shall be used solely for building 
mechanicals, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, utilities and other building 
service uses and shall be excluded from both the calculation of Maximum 
Coverage in the Table of Dimensional Requirements and the calculation of Off- 
Street Parking Requirements under Section VI(A)(4). 

On petition of Thomas J. Reynolds and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Town's Zoning Bylaw by 
amending the Table of Dimensional Requirement in Section V(A) to state "60 feet" and "4 
stories" as the Maximum Height in Industrial A Districts, and by adding the following new 
Section V(B)(8)(f): 

f. In the case of a lot located in an Industrial A District, the maximum height of a 

building thereon shall be 4 occupiable stories, but not in excess of 60 occupiable 
feet or 80 total feet, provided that (I) existing municipal water pressure must be 
sufficient for adequate water supply to reach the portion of the building in excess 
of 60 feet for both fire protection and service needs without any artificial means to 
increase existing municipal pressure; and (ii) the space above 60 feet ( as height is 
measured in accordance with this By-Law) shall be: 

(a) used solely for building mechanicals, heating, ventilation and air 
conditioning, utilities and other building services uses, 

(b) set back at least 10 feet on ail sides from the outside face of the top 
story of the building, and 

(c) excluded from both the calculation of Maximum Coverage in the Table 
of Dimensional Requirements and the calculation of Off-Street Parking 
Requirements under Section VI(A)(4). 

A motion was made and seconded to amend the motion by adding to Section V(B)(8)(f) the 
following subsection, "(d) that the outside face of any building greater than sixty feet (60*) be at 
least 1000 feet from the district boundary line of any residence zone. The amendment was 
approved by a Majority vote. 

A second motion was made and seconded to amend motion by adding to Section V(B)(8)(f) the 
following subsection, "(e) all lighting of the buildings and grounds including light posts be 
screened and shielded from the abutting residential neighbors." The amendment was approved by 
a Majority vote. 

The amended motion was approved. 

VOTE: YES: 324 NO: 60 A 2/3 vote required 



Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 



147 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 10. 1996 

ARTICLE 73. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management and 
control of a parcel of land on Topping Road, Assessor's Map 51, Lot 45, and improvements, if 
any thereon, held by the Board of Selectmen, to the Board of Selectmen, for the purpose of 
conveyance of said land to the Andover Community Trust, Inc., in exchange for the conveyance 
of certain land owned by the Andover Community Trust, Inc. on Heather Drive, Assessor's Map 
5, Lot 92, to the Town for general municipal purposes and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and Town Manager to petition the General Court for special legislation authorizing said 
conveyance, or do anything related thereto. 

On petition of Susan G. Stott and others 



WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 74. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of 
Andover by inserting in the appropriate place the following: 

1 . All articles in the warrant shall be numbered sequentially by the Board of Selectmen. At 
Town Meeting, the Town Clerk shall place all article numbers in a container. The Town 
Moderator shall draw a number and that article shall be presented to Town Meeting for 
action. Another number may not be drawn until Town Meeting has acted upon that 
article. 

2. Certain articles that are related to each other (or one another) - whereby the passage of 
the article is dependent upon the action of another article - shall be taken as one drawing 
for action. 

3. When the Budget (Omnibus) article is drawn, the order of consideration of said article 
shall be drawn from a second container, which shall contain function headings: 
Administration, Public Safety, Public Works, Education, etc. 

4. During Town Meeting, after an article has been acted upon and prior to another number 
being drawn, any voter may move to consider any remaining article. This motion shall 
require a four-fifths vote of Town Meeting. 

5. Once an article has been drawn, any voter may move to postpone consideration to another 
time. Such motion shall require a two-thirds vote of Town Meeting. 

6. The official record of each Town Meeting shall report the articles in the order as printed in 
the warrant. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 74 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapprove 

ARTICLE 75. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to enter into a written agreement 
with Alexander D. Gibson, Jr. and Hannah H. Gibson, establishing the common boundary 
separating land owned by the Town (Assessor's Map 83, Lot 42-B) and land owned by the 
Gibsons (Assessor's Map 83, Lot 44). These parcels have frontage on County Road and 
Rattlesnake Hill Road. 

On petition of Dominic S. Terranova and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town 
Authorize the Selectmen and/or Conservation Commission to enter into a written agreement with 
Alexander D. Gibson, Jr., and Hannah H. Gibson, establishing the common boundary line 
separating the land owned by the Town, but under the custody and control of the conservation 

148 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING AfRtL 10, 1996 

Commission ( Assessor's Map 83, Lot 42-B) And owned by the Gibsons (Assessor's Map 83, 
Lot 44) Theses parcels have frontage on County Road and Rattlesnake Hill Road 



Board of Selectmen Report Approval 

ARTICLE 76. To see if the Town will vote to direct the Andover Board of Selectmen and 
Town Manager, henceforth to use no more than 5% of the allowable new growth under the 
Proposition I'A formula to be used to determine the real estate tax levy limit. 

On petition of Dennis Teves and others 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 77. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds and appropriate a sum not to exceed $52,000 for the Merrimack Valley Regional Transit 
Authority for elderly bus transportation service subsidy, or take any other action related thereto 

Upon motion moved and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to approve Article 77 
as printed in the warrant in the Amount of $52,000 from available funds. 

Finance Committee Report. Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 78. To see if the Town will vote to require that, henceforth, the Selectmen shall 
provide each voter of the Town of Andover with an official copy of the Warrant for any annual or 
special Town Meeting, to be used for the conduct of the business of such Town Meeting, and 
stating the time and place of holding the meeting and the subjects to be acted upon thereat, in 
compliance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 39, Section 10, such document to be 
devoid of editorial comment, recommendations and statements of approval or disapproval of any 
kind. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 78 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 79. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by deleting subsection 
I V.B.I 1 A in its entirety and substituting the following: 

"IV.B.11A. 

Convenience store, which shall SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MU IG IA 

ID 

mean commercial establishment N N N N N N BA BA N N 

BA 

whose principal purpose is to serve a 

variety of day-to-day domestic or personal 

consumption needs, including but not limited 

to the sale of all or one of the following items: 

household goods, meat or food products, 

bakery goods, flowers, newspapers, periodicals, 

pharmaceuticals, dairy products, and beverages; 

and a cleaner of clothing establishment. Such 

establishments (a) not to exceed a usable floor 



150 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11. 1996 

area or 3500 sq. ft. for retail use, (b) having 
extended hours of operation, and (c) having a 
high turnover of customers per hour. 

On petition of S. Joseph Hoffman and others 

Article 79 was DEFEATED. The proponent agreed to withdraw his motion. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:45 P.M. , until 
Thursday, April 1 1, 1996 at 7:00 P.M. at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High School, 
Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 11. 1996 



The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 293 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:05 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit one (1) non-voter to the meeting and to escort non- 
voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 



ARTICLE 80. To authorize, pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 4A, 
as amended, an Agreement with House of Atreus Realty Trust and the Town of Tewksbury 
whereby: 

a. the Town of Andover will provide water services (and be paid for such services) to 
lots 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 Crystal Circle which are located in the Town of Tewksbury; and 

b. the Town of Tewksbury will provide sewer services (and be paid for such services) 
to lots 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, VI, 25, 27, and 29 Crystal Circle which are located in the Town of 
Andover; 

c. the Town of Andover will pay to Tewksbury the bills for sewer usage assessed 
against the lots in Andover and then Andover shall issue its own bill to the owners of the Andover 
lots for the sewer usage; 

d. the Town of Tewksbury will pay to Andover the bills for water usage assessed 
against the lots in Tewksbury and then Tewksbury shall issue its own bills to the owners of the 
Tewksbury lots for the water usage; 

e. the Town of Andover will snowplow the roadway known as Crystal Circle in both 
the Town of Andover and the Town of Tewksbury; 

f. the Town of Tewksbury will indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Town of 
Andover for claims relating to sewer backup in the lots in Andover; 

g. the Town of Andover will indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Town of 
Tewksbury for claims relating to water main breaks in the lots in Tewksbury; and 

h. the Agreement shall be for a period not to exceed 25 years and may contain a 
provision for earlier termination as provided in Massachusetts General Laws Ch. 40, Sec. 4A, as 
amended. 

151 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11. 1996 

I. The Agreement shall comply with the provision of Massachusetts General Laws, 

Ch. 40, Sec. 4A, as amended. 

All lots being shown on a Plan of Land known as Crystal Circle Subdivision which is 
located in both Andover and Tewksbury, Massachusetts and to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
as the Water and Sewer Commissioners and the Town Manager to enter into such an agreement 
upon such terms and conditions they deem appropriate. 

On petition of Mark B. Johnson and others 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 80 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report : Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 81. A petition to rezone property at 66 Poor Street from apartment zoning to its 
original zoning of SRA in order to maintain conformity with all abutters north of Windsor Street 
and maintain Windsor Street as the demarcation line in the Shawsheen community between 
commercial/apartment and residential zoning. 

On petition of Kevin Callery and others 

Article 81 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 108 NO: 133 A 2/3 vote required 



Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

Historical Commission: Approval 

ARTICLE 82. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds and appropriate a sum not to exceed $132,000 to the Accumulated Employee Benefit 
Account for funding accrued employee vacation and sick leave liabilities upon retirement or take 
any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 83. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and the Town Manager 
to take such action as may be requested by the North East Solid Waste Committee ("NESWC") 
to implement the NESWC strategic plan as that plan related to the Town, including without 
limitation entering into an agreement with Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc. ("MR1") the provisions 
of which will (I) supplement or replace provisions of the existing Service Agreement between the 
Town and MRI, (ii) extend the Service Agreement term to June 30, 2015 and/or (iii) provide for a 
revised service fee and such other terms and conditions as the Selectmen shall determine as 
necessary and in the best interests of the Town, or act in any other manner in relation thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



152 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11. 1996 

ARTICLE 84. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 111 Section 3 of the General 
Bylaws to add Section 3(c) as follows: 

(c) Town Moderator: The term of office for the Town Moderator shall be three 
years. 
or take any other action related thereto. 



WITHDRAWN 
ARTICLE 85. RECALL PROCEDURES 
Recall of Elected Officers 
Section I 

(a) Application - Any person who holds an elected town office with more than six months 
remaining of the term of office may be recalled from the office by the voters in the manner as 
herein provided. 

(b) Recall Petitions - One hundred and fifty (150) or more voters may file with the Town Clerk 
an affidavit containing the name of the officer whose recall is sought and a statement of the 
grounds upon which the petition is based. The signatures on such petition shall contain the names 
of at least ten (10) voters in each of the precincts into which the town is divided for the purpose 
of electing town officers. The Town Clerk shall, within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt, submit 
the petitions to the Registrars of Voters who shall forthwith certify thereon the number of 
signatures that are names of voters. If the said petition is found to be valid and contains sufficient 
signatures, the Town Clerk shall thereupon deliver to the first ten voters listed upon the affidavit, 
petition blanks in such number as requested demanding such recall, printed forms of which he/she 
shall keep available. The blanks may be completed by printing or typewriting; they shall be 
addressed to the Board of Selectmen, and the grounds for recall as stated in the affidavit; they 
shall demand the election of a successor to the office; they shall be dated and signed by the Town 
Clerk. The recall petition shall be returned to the Town Clerk within twenty-one days following 
the date they are issued, signed by at least ten percent of the total number of persons registered to 
vote as of the date of the most recent town election. The Town Clerk shall within four (4) 
working days, commencing the day after submission with him/her, submit the petitions to the 
Board of Registrars which shall within seven (7) working days, certify thereon the number of 
signatures which are names of voters. 

(c) Recall Election - If the petition shall be certified by the Registrars of Voters to be sufficient, 
the Town Clerk shall within five (5) working days, or at the next meeting of the Board of 
Selectmen, submit the same with his/her certification. Upon its receipt of the certified petition, 
the Board of Selectmen shall within two (2) working days, give notice, in writing, of said petition 
to the officer who recall is sought. If said officer does not resign his/her office within five (5) 
working days following delivery of said notice, the Board of Selectmen shall order a special 
election to be held not less than sixty (60) nor more than ninety (90) days after the date of the 
certification of the Town Clerk, that the petition is sufficient. If, however, another election is to 
occur within one-hundred (100) days after the date of said certificate, the Selectmen shall hold the 
recall election on the date of such other election. If a vacancy occurs in the office after a recall 
election has been ordered, the election shall nevertheless proceed as provided in this section, but 
only the ballots for candidates need to be counted. 

(d) Nomination of Candidates - Any officer whose recall is sought may not be a candidate to 
succeed himself in the recall election. The nomination of candidates, the publication of the 
warrant for the recall election, and the conduct of same shall all be in accordance with the 
provisions of law relating to elections. 



153 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11. 1996 

(e) Propositions on Ballot - Ballots used at the recall election shall state the proposition in the 
order indicated: 

For the recall of (Name of Officer) 
Against the recall of (Name of Officer) 

Adjacent to each proposition shall be a place to vote for either of said propositions. After the said 
proposition shall appear the word "Candidates" and the name of the Candidates arranged by 
alphabetical order by the last name by the Town Clerk. If a majority of the votes cast on the 
proposition is against the recall, the votes for candidates need not be counted. If the majority of 
the votes cast is in favor of recall, the votes for candidates shall be counted and candidates 
receiving the highest number of votes shall be declared elected. 

(f) Officeholder - The incumbent shall continue to hold his office and to perform his duties until 
the recall election. If he is not then recalled, he shall continue in office for the remainder of his 
unexpired term. If the officer is recalled, he shall be deemed removed upon the certification of the 
election results. The candidate who received the highest number of votes will serve for the 
balance of the unexpired term. 

(g) Repeat of Recall Petition - No recall petition shall be filed against an officer within six 
months after he takes office, or in the case of an officer subjected to a recall election and not 
recalled, thereby until at least six months after the election at which his recall was submitted to 
the voters 

Section II 

Final Acceptance of Special Act - Special Act as stated in the above Recall Petition will take 
effect either on the thirtieth day after it is signed by the State Legislation or on an effective date 
specified in the legislation. 

On petition of Lynne Robidoux and others 

Article 85 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 



Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
School Committee Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 86. To see if the Town will vote to accept the layout of the relocated portion of 
River Road which was constructed in 1976 to relocate the entranceway to the property owned by 
Digital Equipment Corporation and Hewlett Packard, which layout is more fully depicted on a 
plan entitled "Plan Showing Alteration of Layout River Road" dated December 1 1, 1995 by 
Andover Consultants, Inc. and filed with the Town Clerk; or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

On petition of Daniel J. Ossoff and others 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 86 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 87. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw in Section III, 
District Boundaries (and make the appropriate changes to the Zoning Map of Andover, 

154 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APR1L1I. 1996 

Massachusetts) by changing so much of that certain parcel of land situated off of Haverhill Street 
shown as Lot 103 of the Town of Andover Assessor's Map 18 as is zoned Industrial D (ID) to 
Single Residence A (SRA). 

On petition of Elizabeth Tentarelli and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 87 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 204 NO: 28 A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 88. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw in Section III, 
District Boundaries (and make the appropriate changes to the Zoning Map of Andover, 
Massachusetts) by changing so much of that certain parcel of land situated off of Haverhill Street 
shown as Lot 103 of the Town of Andover Assessor's Map 18 as is zoned Industrial D (ID) to 
Single Residence B (SRB). 

On petition of Elizabeth Tentarelli and others 



WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 89. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover General Bylaws, Article XII, 
11, a, "Definitions", to add the following: "Kennel: one pack or collection of dogs on a single 
premises, whether maintained for breeding, boarding, sale, training, hunting or other purposes and 
including any shop where dogs are on sale, and also including every pack or collection of more 
than three dogs three months old or over, owned or kept by a person on a single premises 
irrespective of the purpose for which they are maintained." as it appears in the Massachusetts 
General Laws, chapter 140, Section 136A. And to further amend Article X3I, 1 1, n(l) by 
inserting the following after the first sentence: "Kennel license fees shall be as follows: Less than 
four dogs - $25.00, four to nine dogs - $50.00, more than ten dogs - $75.00." or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 89 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant with a change in the phrase "more than ten dogs" in the last 
sentence to "10 or more dogs". 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote 
to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 8:45 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



<£4?7iS 



155 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

William Francis Galvin 
Secretary of the Commonwealth 
SS. Essex 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Andover. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in 
Elections to vote at: 

Precincts 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 

DUNN GYMNASIUM COMPLEX, ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL 

SHAWSHEEN ROAD, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

AND 

Precincts 1, 3, and 8 

8R. CITIZEN CENTER, WHITTIER COURT 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

on TUESDAY, THE 17TH of SEPTEMBER 1996 

7:00 a.m. TO 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their vote in the State Primary for the candidates of 
Political parties for the following offices: 



U.S. Senator 

Representative in Congress 

Councillor 

Senator in General Court 

Representative in General 

Court 

Representative in General 

Court 

Register of Probate 

County Treasurer 

County Commissioner 



For The Commonwealth 
Fifth Congressional District 
Fifth Councillor District 
Second Essex and Middlesex 
Senatorial District 
Seventeenth Essex 
(Precincts 1,2,3,4,6,7,8) 
Eighteenth Middlesex 

(Precinct 5 only ) 
Essex County 
Essex County 
Essex County 



Given under our hands this 26th day of August, 1996 

James M. Barenboim 
Gerald H. Silverman 
William T. Downs 
Larry L. Larsen 
Barry F. Finegold 



Selectmen 



A true copy 
ATTEST 



John F. Manning 
Constable 



Date: August 30, 1996 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purpose stated 
in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of same on the 
Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other 
public places where bills and notices are usually posted. Said 
warrants have been seven days. 

John F. Manning, Constable 



156 



SEPTEMBER 17, 1996 
DEMOCRATIC PARTY Y TOTAL: 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 



DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY 



1757 

Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Precinct 3 Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Precinct 6 Precinct 7 Precinct 8 TOTAL 



John F. Kerry 


225 


188 


198 


167 


60 


160 


172 


156 


1326 


Susan Gallagher 


2 























2 


All Others 


9 


3 


3 


3 


1 


2 


2 


3 


26 


Blanks 


60 


67 


56 


51 


23 


54 


30 


62 


403 


Total 


296 


258 


257 


221 


84 


216 


204 


221 


1757 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 




















Martin T. Meehan 


233 


219 


210 


190 


69 


172 


173 


176 


1442 


Patrick M. Raymond 


34 


23 


29 


18 


10 


23 


16 


20 


173 


All Others 


1 























1 


Blanks 


28 


16 


18 


13 


5 


21 


15 


25 


141 


Total 


296 


258 


257 


221 


84 


216 


204 


221 


1757 


COUNCILLOR 




















Patricia Dowimg 


220 


186 


189 


166 


60 


155 


144 


138 


1258 


James P. Mahoney 


20 


28 


20 


9 


2 


16 


16 


23 


134 


Blanks 


56 


44 


48 


46 


22 


45 


44 


60 


365 


Total 


296 


258 


257 


221 


84 


216 


204 


221 


1757 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 




















John D. O'Brien. Jr. 


235 


216 


208 


182 


66 


162 


167 


170 


1406 


All Others 


1 








1 














2 


Blanks 


60 


42 


49 


38 


18 


54 


37 


51 


349 


Total 


296 


258 


257 


221 


84 


216 


204 


221 


1757 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 


















Seventeenth Essex District 




















Barry R Finegold 


134 


120 


130 


131 


N/A 


143 


142 


116 


916 


Denise A. Parsons 


147 


132 


120 


86 


N/A 


67 


59 


99 


710 


Blanks 


15 


6 


7 


4 


N/A 


6 


3 


6 


47 


Total 


296 


258 


257 


221 


N/A 


216 


204 


221 


1673 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 


















Eighteenth Middlesex District 




















Edward A. LeLacheur 










49 








49 


Barry Finegold 










1 








1 


Blanks 










34 








34 


Total 










84 








84 


REGISTER OF PROBATE 




















William J. Buckley 


129 


128 


117 


99 


39 


103 


89 


92 


796 


Pamela Casey O'Brien 


76 


42 


58 


45 


15 


40 


38 


40 


354 


Joyce Bums Spiliotis 


30 


34 


38 


26 


12 


26 


30 


32 


228 


All Others 


1 























1 


Blanks 


60 


54 


44 


51 


18 


47 


47 


57 


378 


Total 


296 


258 


257 


221 


84 


216 


204 


221 


1757 


COUNTY TREASURER 




















Timothy A Bassett 


120 


116 


111 


79 


32 


79 


81 


81 


699 


Christie Chris Ciampa, Jr. 


65 


50 


53 


45 


20 


55 


47 


47 


382 


Leonard Fafel 


22 


18 


17 


22 


6 


22 


12 


10 


129 


All Others 


1 























1 


Blanks 


88 


74 


76 


75 


26 


60 


64 


83 


546 


Total 


296 


258 


257 


221 


84 


216 


204 


221 


1757 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 




















Marguerite P, Kane 


175 


160 


166 


138 


47 


118 


115 


126 


1045 


John V. O'Brien 


73 


79 


82 


62 


29 


57 


63 


65 


510 


Louis E. Coviello 


28 


19 


24 


24 


11 


22 


20 


26 


174 


Michael T. Phelan 


48 


49 


47 


27 


14 


37 


36 


30 


288 


All Others 


1 





3 


1 














5 


Blanks 


267 


209 


192 


190 


67 


198 


174 


195 


1492 


Total 


592 


516 


514 


442 


168 


432 


408 


442 


3514 



157 



REPUBLICAN STATE PRIMARY 



SEPTEMBER 17, 1996 
REPUBLICAN PARTY Y TOTAL: 562 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


TOT/i 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 




















William F Weld 


88 


68 


83 


71 


44 


50 


45 


76 


525 


Susan Gallagher 























2 


2 


All Others 








1 














1 


2 


Blanks 


7 


9 


7 





1 


8 


1 





33 


Total 


95 


77 


91 


71 


45 


58 


46 


79 


562 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 




















Paul Cronin 


1 














1 





1 


3 


All Others 


6 





3 


3 





2 


1 


1 


16 


Blanks 


88 


77 


88 


68 


45 


55 


46 


76 


76 


Total 


95 


77 


91 


71 


45 


58 


47 


78 


562 


COUNCILLOR 




















Kevin J Leach 


68 


58 


60 


55 


31 


38 


35 


61 


406 


Blanks 


27 


19 


31 


16 


14 


20 


12 


17 


156 


Total 


95 


77 


91 


71 


45 


58 


47 


78 


562 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 




















All Others 


8 





1 


1 











1 


11 


Blanks 


87 


77 


90 


70 


45 


58 


47 


77 


551 


Total 


95 


77 


91 


71 


45 


58 


47 


78 


562 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Seventeenth Essex District 
James E Fox 80 

All Others 

Blanks 15 

Total 95 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

All others 

Blanks 

Total 



REGISTER OF PROBATE 

Jane Brady Stirgwolt 
Susan M. Brotchie 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 

COUNTY TREASURER 

George K Mazareas 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



68 

9 
77 



79 
1 

11 
91 



63 

8 
71 



53 


36 


54 


35 


22 


27 


15 


23 


1 











19 


14 


22 


13 


95 


77 


91 


71 


70 


62 


60 


54 














25 


15 


31 


17 


95 


77 


91 


71 


4 








1 


186 


154 


182 


141 


190 


154 


182 


142 



N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 



42 
3 
45 



25 
11 

9 
45 



31 

14 
45 





90 
90 



49 

1 

8 
58 



26 
24 

8 
58 



41 

17 
58 



1 
115 
116 



39 


8 
47 



22 
15 

10 
47 



34 

13 

47 




94 
94 



72 

6 
78 



450 
2 
65 

517 





42 




3 




45 


46 


297 


17 


154 





1 


15 


110 


78 


562 


63 


415 


1 


1 


14 


146 


78 


562 


5 


11 


151 


1113 


156 


1124 



158 



LIBERTARIAN STATE PRIMARY 



SEPTEMBER 17, 1996 



LIBERTARIAN PARTY Y TOTAL: 2 



Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Precinct 3 Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Precinct 6 Precinct 7 Precinct 8 TOTAL 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

George Phillies 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



COUNCILLOR 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

All Others 

Blanks 1 

Total 1 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

All Others 

Blanks 1 

Total 1 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Seventeenth Essex District 

All Others 

Blanks 1 

Total 1 



N/A 
N/A 




REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

All others 

Blanks 

Total 



REGISTER OF PROBATE 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



COUNTY TREASURER 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 

All Others 000000000 

Blanks 220000004 

Total 220000004 



159 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 23, 1997 



WARRANT 
ART, NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


\CTION 
TAKEN 


APPR. BY 
ATTY. GEN . 


I 


NESWC Agreement 


Approved 




2 


Retirement Credit/Military 
Service - 


Approved 




3. 


Sewer Ballardvale 


Withdrawn 




4 


Assisted Living 
- Zoning Bylaw 


Defeated 




5 


Exclusion of Wetlands 
- Zoning Bylaw 


Withdrawn 




6 


Increase Side Yard Setbacks 
- Zoning Bylaw 


Withdrawn 




7 


Slope Exclusion 
- Zoning Bylaw 


Withdrawn 




8 


Growth Rate Impact Study 
- $20,00 


Approved 




9 


Conservation Land Acquisition 
-$1,500,000 


Approved 




10 


Youth Services Passenger 
- $28,000 


Approved 




11. 


Maple Street Improvements 


Defeated 




12. 


Colonial Drive Improvements 


Defeated 




13. 


Colonial Drive 

- Street Acceptance 


Approved 


NOTE: Was not laid out- 
Vote was nul! and void 


I 4 


School Building Committee 
- Charter Change/Special Act 


Approved 




15. 


Jenkins Road Easement 


Approved 




16. 


Changing Mix Use 
- Zoning Bylaw 


Withdrawn 





160 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - October 23. 1996 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, October 8, 1 996, The Inhabitants of said Town who 
are qualified to vote in the Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the West Middle School on 
Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY THIRD DAY OF OCTOBER, 1996 

at seven o'clock P M to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 
have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated 
in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each 
schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted 
and by publication in the Andover TOWNSMAN. Said Warrants have been posted and published 
fourteen days. 



John F. Manning 
Constable 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 945 voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 7:05 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Father Richard L. Foley, St. Augustine Church, Andover. 

Salute to the flag was led by James Barenboim, Chairman, Board of Selectman. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit non-voters to the meeting and allow non-voters to be 
escorted to the non voting section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Collins Center. 

The Moderator announced the voting sections of the Hall. 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take such 
action as may be requested by the North East Solid Waste Committee ("NESWC") to implement 
the NESWC strategic plan as that plan relates to the Town, including, without limitation, entering 
into an agreement with Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc. ("MRI") the provisions of which will (I) 
supplement or replace provisions of the existing Service Agreement between the Town and MRI, 
and/or (ii) extend the Service Agreement term to September 30, 2015 or such other date as the 
Board of Selectmen shall approve and/or (iii) provide for a revised service fee and such other 
terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen shall determine as necessary and in the best 
interests of the Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and seconded it was moved that the Board of Selectmen be hereby 
authorized to take such action as may be requested by the North East Solid Waste Committee 
("NESWC") to implement the NESWC strategic plan as that plan relates to the Town, including 
without limitation entering into an agreement with Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc. ("MRI") the 
provisions of which will (I) supplement or replace provisions of the existing Service Agreement 
between the Town and MRI, and /or (ii) extend the Service Agreement term to September 30, 
2015 or such other date as the Selectmen shall approve and/or (iii) provide for a revised service 
fee and/or such other terms and conditions as the Selectmen shall determine as necessary and in 
the best interests of the Town. 

An amendment was moved and seconded that the Town of Andover immediately seek to 
terminate the contract with NESWC and Wheelabator because of the serious threat to the health 
and well-being of the citizens of Andover and the surrounding communities. 

The amendment lost by a Majority vote. 

A second amendment was moved and seconded to change the year "2015" to the year "2005" and 
delete the words "or such other date as the Selectmen shall approve" so that the Article was 
amended to read: 

161 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 23. 199 6 

The Board of Selectmen be hereby authorized to take such action as may be requested by the 
North East Solid Waste Committee ("NESWC") to implement the NESWC strategic plan as that 
plan relates to the Town, including without limitation entering into an agreement with 
Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc. ("MRJ") the provisions of which will (I) supplement or replace 
provisions of the existing Service Agreement between the Town and MRI, and /or (ii) extend the 
Service Agreement term to September 30, 2005 and/or (iii) provide for a revised service fee 
and/or such other terms and conditions as the Selectmen shall determine as necessary and in the 
best interests of the Town. 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

The amended motion was approved by a Majority vote. 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Finance Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 71 of the Acts of 
1996 to provide certain public employees creditable retirement service time for active service in 
the armed forces of the United States, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 2 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority Vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
$6,000,000 for the installation of sanitary sewer lines in the Ballard vale Road area as shown on 
the 1979 Wastewater Facilities Plan; and to authorize the Town to acquire the necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain. Betterments are to be 
assessed, or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By Law as follows: 

I. Delete the words "or sanitarium, rest, convalescent or nursing home" from Section IV.B.5. of 
the Zoning Bylaw. 

II. Insert a new subsection, "IV.B.5A. Elderly Housing 

ZONING DISTRICTS 
Miscellaneous Main Uses SRA/SRB/SRC/APT LS OP/GB/MU/IG/IA/ID 

1. Long term care facility* PB**PB PB N 

2. Assisted living residence PB PB N N 

3. Congregate care facility PB PB N N 

4. Independent living PB PB N N 
Residence 

III. Insert a new subsection "VI. V. Elderly Housing 

1. Purposes 

The objectives of this Section are to achieve the following public purposes: 
a. To provide for the development and use of alternative housing and nursing care 

162 



N 




N 






N 


N 


PBPBN 


N 


N 


N 


N 


PBPBN 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N N N 


N 


N" 



SPECIAL TPWM MSETINg OCTOBER 23. 19 9 6 

for the elderly in accordance with the Town's Master Plan ; 

b. To create home health care, housing and other supportive services for the elderly 
population outside of an institutional setting; 

c. To encourage the preservation of open space; 

d. To provide alternative housing for the elderly that cause relatively little demand on 
Town services; 

e. To preserve the Town's residential character 

f. To provide such accommodations in a manner harmonious with the surrounding 
land uses while protecting natural resources and open space. 

g. To provide housing which is affordable to the elderly population who are Andover 
residents, 

2. Assisted Living Residences 

a. Applicability: The Planning Board is the Special Permit Granting Authority 
("SPGA")for Assisted Living Facilities as defined in this bylaw. 

b. Design Standards and Guidelines: 



(1 ) Minimum lot size: An assisted living facility shall be permitted in a SRA and SRB 
zone only within a single lot containing a total area of not less than 5 acres. In the 
ML) district, the minimum lot size shall be 2 acres. There shall be no minimum lot 
size required for the GB district. 

(2) Density: The maximum allowable density shall be 3000 square feet of lot area per 
assisted living unit. 

(3) Dimensional requirements: 

(a) Building height: Any addition or new construction shall not exceed 35 feet 
in height as measured in accordance with the State Building Code or three 
stories. This does not preclude the reuse and renovation of existing 
structures which may exceed this height limit. 

(b) Building coverage: The maximum building coverage, including accessory 
buildings, shall not exceed 30% of the lot area for new construction or 
expansion of existing structures. 

(c) Building set backs: In the SRA and SRB zones, buildings shall be set back 
a minimum of 50 feet from all property lines. In the MU zone, the 
building set back will be 20 feet. Buildings in the GB zone shall be set 
back as required in Section V.B.2.d of this bylaw. 

(d) Set back from residential dwellings: In the SRA and SRB zones, all 
buildings associated with the assisted living facility shall be no closer than 
200 feet from existing residential dwellings; however, with respect to 
accessory structures not greater than 300 square feet in said zones, the 
SPG A in its discretion, may reduce said set back by an amount up to but 
not greater than 100 feet if it determines that said structure will not 
adversely impact the use and enjoyment of the existing residential dwelling. 

In the MU and GB districts, the set back shall be 50 feet. 

(e) Minimum lot frontage: The minimum lot frontage shall conform to the 
requirements of the district where such use is located. 

c. Other Requirements: 

(1 ) Town services: Assisted living residences shall be serviced by public water and 
sewer of sufficient capacity to serve the project. Any extension and/or 
replacement of sewer and/or water lines necessary to provide sufficient capacity 
shall be the responsibility of the applicant. 

(2) Transportation services. The operator of the assisted living residence shall be 

163 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 23. 1996 

required to provide or arrange for transportation to town services and facilities. 

(3) Common Open Space: In the SRA and SRB districts, there shall be an area of 
common open space equal to at least 30% of the lot area. The common open 
space shall be retained in perpetuity for conservation or passive recreation use No 
more than 25% of the minimum required open space shall be situated within 
wetlands A permanent conservation restriction running to or enforceable by the 
Town shall be recorded for the common open space area and shall include 
restrictions that the land be retained in perpetuity for conservation and/or passive 
recreation. 

(4) Parking: The minimum number of parking spaces provided on the lot shall be 0.4 
parking space per assisted living unit plus one parking space per three employees 
during the largest shift. Up to 25% of the minimum number of required spaces may 
be allocated for compact cars in accordance with the design standards of Section 
IV.A.5.b. of this bylaw. The Planning Board, in its discretion, may require 
additional parking spaces to serve the needs of employees, visitors and service 
vehicles, such spaces to be provided in a "reserve parking area" which would not 
be built unless determined necessary by the Inspector of Buildings. 

(5) Access and On-Site Circulation: Adequate on-site circulation shall be provided to 
and from the site, taking into consideration the adjacent sidewalks and streets and 
accessibility of the site and building(s) thereon for emergency vehicles. Adequate 
provision shall be made for off-street loading and unloading requirements of 
delivery vehicles and passengers using private transportation. 

(6) Public Safety: For any assisted living residence, the structure shall comply with 
the National Fire Protection Association Life Safety Code, including sprinklers. 
The facility shall also have an integrated emergency call, telephone and other 
communication system to provide monitoring for its residents. There shall be 
sufficient site access for public safety vehicles. A plan shall be approved by the 
Andover Fire Department for the emergency evacuation of residents with emphasis 
on ensuring the safety of residents with physical impairments. 

(7) Landscaping: Landscaping and screening is required to obscure visibility from 
beyond the boundaries of the premises of parking areas, dumpster locations, and 
loading areas. 

(8) AJTordability: Except as provided in Sections VI.V.2.c.(8)(e) and Vl.V.2.c.(8)(I), 
15% of the total number of assisted living units shall be set aside as affordable 
housing units for elderly persons who qualify as low, moderate or upper-moderate 
income persons as defined as follows: 

Low Income - below 60% of the Lawrence SMSA median income based on 
HUD figures ("Median Income") 

Moderate Income - 60-79% of Median Income 

Upper-Moderate Income - 80-100% of Median Income 

In determining the total number of affordable units required, a fractional unit of .5 or more 
shall be regarded as a whole unit. To the extent legally permissible, the affordable units 
shall be offered to eligible Andover residents before being offered to non-Andover eligible 
elderly persons. 

(a) Such affordable units may be rented, sold or otherwise provided to 
qualified elderly persons in accordance with income and asset limitations 
established by the authorizing state or federal agency in those instances 
where the affordable units benefit directly from such assistance, or in the 
absence thereof pursuant to the definitions of income and assets established 
for the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program, or pursuant to the 
standards promulgated by the SPGA. 

(b) Affordable units shall be dispersed throughout the building(s) and shall be 

164 



SPECIAL IflHM MEETING OCTOBER 23. 199 6 

compatible with and generally comparable to the market-rate units in terms 
of location, quality and character. 

(c) Of the affordable units, the applicant shall set aside units representing all 
three income levels as follows: 20% shall serve low income persons, 50% 
shall serve moderate income persons and 30% shall serve upper moderate 
income persons. 

(d) Although eligibility for the affordable units shall be determined by reference 
to income and assets of the prospective residents, the affordable units shall 
be considered affordable only if they are restricted in the amount of 
monthly rent or other monthly charges for the unit based upon a percentage 
of the applicable Median Income. For purposes of computing the monthly 
rent or other monthly charges for the unit, there shall be excluded any 
special charges for extra or specialized services which are not provided to 
the general population of the project but are unique to the particular needs 
of an individual resident. The standards of affordability for proposed 
projects including, without limitation, the methods of determining and 
maintaining eligibility, the percentage of applicable Median Income used 
for limiting the monthly amounts charged for the affordable units, and any 
variations in the percentages of Median Income in the three income levels, 
shall be set and revised from time to time by the SPGA provided said 
standards are consistent with appropriate Federal and State standards. 

(e) At the discretion of the SPGA, the applicant may be permitted to set aside 
a lower percentage of affordable units, but in no case less than 10% of the 
units if, in the opinion of the SPGA, the applicant has demonstrated that 
public subsidies (including without limitation, public or low interest 
financing, tax benefits and Town provided subsidies such as provision of 
services, real estate tax abatements or reduced assessments or reductions of 
water and sewer charges with respect to the affordable units) are 
unavailable or inappropriate and/or the provision of the required 
percentage of affordable units will threaten the viability of the project 
without some form of relief. In such cases, or in order to encourage an 
applicant to exceed the required percentage of affordable units, the SPGA 
may : 

(I) provide a density bonus whereby the total number of allowable units 
computed under Section VI.V.2.b.(2) ("Maximum Allowable Units"), may 
be increased by an amount of additional units determined by the SPGA not 
to exceed 25% of the Maximum Allowable Units, and any such additional 
units granted by the SPGA as a density bonus shall be market units and 
shall not cause a corresponding increase in the number of required 
affordable units; 

(ii) permit higher percentages of units to be offered to moderate or upper- 
moderate income persons; and/or 

(iii) permit the applicant to make a cash or other contribution to the Town 
or its designee for use by the Town in (a) providing or subsidizing 
affordable housing for low, moderate and upper-moderate income elderly 
persons as defined by this section of the by-law or (b) providing other 
elderly facilities or elderly services. 

(0 Affordability restrictions shall be embodied in applicable deed covenants, 
contractual agreements and/or other mechanisms to ensure compliance 
with this subsection. 

(g) All affordable units shall be maintained as affordable housing units for the 
life of the Assisted Living Facility. 

(h) Prior to the issuance of any building permit for any units, a clearance 
certificate shall be required to be issued by the Planning Department 
indicating compliance with this subsection. No clearance certificate shall 

165 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 23. 19 9 6 

be issued for any units until (1) all documents necessary to ensure 
compliance with this subsection (including, without limitation, the 
documents referred to in subparagraph (f) have been executed and, if 
required, recorded at the Registry of Deeds and (2) any required cash or 
other contribution has been made to the Town or its designee. 

(I) Nothing in this subsection shall preclude a developer from setting aside 
more than the required number of affordable units or from setting aside 
additional units for higher but limited income groups or from setting aside 
more units for lower income groups. 

(9) Accessory Uses: The operator of the assisted living facility may also provide 
optional services on the site for the convenience of residents, including, but not 
limited to transportation, barber/beauty services, sundries for personal 
consumption, laundry services, and other amenities, provided such uses serve 
primarily the residents and staff of the Assisted Living Residence and the accessory 
uses shall be wholly within a residential structure and shall have no exterior 
advertising display; 

( 1 0) Existing Facilities: None of the provisions of this section shall apply to Assisted 
Living Residences existing on the date of adoption of this section. 

d. Special Permit Procedure: The procedure for a special permit under this section 

shall comply with the procedures outlined in Section VI. 3. h. of this bylaw, which 
includes application procedures, special permit criteria and guidelines for Planning 
Board review of the proposal. The Planning Board may impose additional 
conditions if in its judgement such conditions are needed to increase the 
compatibility of the project with its surrounds or to better provide for the 
residents. 

3. Long Term Care Facilities : 

a. Design Standards and Guidelines: 

( 1 ) Building coverage: The maximum building coverage, including accessory 
buildings, shall not exceed 30% of the lot area for new construction or expansion 
of existing structures. 

(2) Building set backs: Buildings shall be set back a minimum of SO feet from all 
property lines. 

(3) Set back from residential dwellings: All buildings associated with the long term 
care facility shall be no closer than 200 feet from existing residential dwellings. 

(4) Minimum lot frontage: The minimum lot frontage shall conform to the 
requirements of the district where such use is located. 

b. Other requirements: 

( 1 ) Town services: Long-term care facilities shall be serviced by public water and 
sewer of sufficient capacity to serve the project. Any extension and/or 
replacement of sewer and/or water lines necessary to provide sufficient capacity 
shall be the responsibility of the applicant. 

4. Congregate Living Facilities: 

a. Applicability: The provisions for Assisted Living Residences shall apply. 

5. Independent living residence. 

a. Applicability: The provisions of subsection VI. 0.2, conversion of a one or two or 
more family dwelling, shall apply. 

b. Parking requirements: The provisions of Section VI.A.4.a(2) shall apply." 

166 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 23. 199 6 

IV. Insert the following definitions in Section II: 

36. Long term care facility: An institution or distinct part of an institution which is licensed by 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to provide 24-hour care under medical 
supervision to individuals who, by reason of advanced age, chronic illness, or infirmity, are unable 
to care for themselves. Long term care facilities provide assistance with Activities of Daily Living 
as defined by 651 CMR 12.02, as well as skilled nursing and medical care by a skilled nursing 
staff. 

37. Assisted living residence: A residential development subject to certification by the Executive 
Office of Elder Affairs under G.L. Chapter 19D, defined as an entity, however organized, whether 
conducted for profit or not for profit, which meets all of the following criteria: 

a. provides room and board; 

b. provides assistance with activities of daily living and personal care services for 
three or more non-related adult residents; and 

c. collects payments or third party reimbursements from or on behalf of residents to 
pay for the provision of assistance. 

Assisted living residences are for frail elders who do not require 24-hour skilled nursing care, but 
need assistance with dressing, bathing, eating, housekeeping, medicine monitoring, and other 
activities of daily living. This definition shall not include group homes, rooming or lodging houses, 
nursing facilities, or other types of elderly housing. 

38. Assisted living units: One or more rooms in an Assisted Living Residence designed for and 
occupied by one or two elderly individuals per bedroom as the private living quarters of such 
individuals. 

39. Assistance with Activities of Daily Living: Providing support, aid, assistance, prompting, 
guidance, or observations of meal preparation, housekeeping, clothes laundering, shopping for 
food or other items, use of transportation and other similar tasks with the purpose of supporting 
an individual to remain in a residential environment for as long as possible. 

40. Congregate living facility: A non-institutional, shared living environment which integrates 
shelter and service needs of functionally impaired and/or socially isolated elderly persons who are 
otherwise in good health and can maintain a semi-independent life style and who do not require 
constant supervision or intensive health care as provided by an institution. Each resident shall 
have an individual bedroom and may have a separate living room, kitchen, dining area, or 
bathroom, and may share living, dining, and bathroom facilities with other elderly persons, such as 
a common dining facility. 

4 1 . Elderly: For the purposes of this bylaw, a person who is 55 years of age or older. 

42. Independent living residence: A dwelling that provides accommodations in dwelling units for 
elderly persons. These residences may include common areas, a common dining facility and space 
for the provision of social, psychological, and educational programs. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 4 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

A motion was made and seconded to amend Article 4 to correct two typographical errors as 
found on pages ten (10) and eleven (1 1) in the Finance Committee Report: 

Page 10. Line 27 "Section V1.3.h" should read "Section VI. 0.3.h. 
And Page 11. Line 7 "Subsection VI. O. 2" should read "Subsection VI.O.l" 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 



167 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 23. 1996 

After a long debate a motion was made and seconded to close debate. 

VOTE Yes: 615 No: 150 A 2/3 vote required 

The amended motion was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Yes: 464 No: 291 A 2/3 vote required 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section II.10A of the Zoning By-law by 
deleting the words "At least ninety percent (90%)" and replacing with the words "One hundred 
percent (100%)" so that the second sentence of that section reads: 

"One hundred percent (100%) of the lot area required for zoning compliance shall be contiguous 
land other than land located with a line identified as the wetland margin as shown on maps entitled 
"Wetland Areas of Andover, MA" and subsequent revisions as approved by the Andover 
Conservation Commission". 

or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section V.A., Table of Dimensional 
Requirements of the Zoning By-law as follows: 

District Minimum Yard Depth 

Side 

(Feet) 
Single Residence 

B Replace 15 with 25** 

C Replace 15 with 30** , 

NOTES: 

** The minimum yard depth of 15 feet shall continue to apply to: I) dwelling units which are 
exempt by virtue of the provisions of G.L. c. 40A, s. 6; and ii) an application for a building permit 
for the enlargement, restoration or reconstruction of a dwelling in existence as of the effective 
date of this by-law. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the town will vote to amend Section V.B. of the Zoning By-law by 
adding the following new subsection: 

"12. Lot/Slope Requirements in the Single Residence Districts: In the single residence zoning 
districts (SRA, SRB, and SRC), the following provisions of this subsection V.B. 12 shall apply: 

a. The purposes of this subsection shall be: (I) to preserve and enhance landscape 
amenities by encouraging the maximum retention of natural topographic features, 
such as drainage swales, streams, slopes, ridge lines, rock outcroppings, vistas, 
natural plant formations, and trees; (ii) to minimize the effects of grading to insure 
that the natural character of steep slopes is retained; (iii) to minimize water-runoff 
and soil-erosion problems incurred in grading of steep slopes; and (iv) to 
encourage innovative architectural, landscaping, circulation and site design. 

168 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 23. 1996 

b. The provisions of this subsection apply to building lots approved in a definitive 
subdivision, or building lots approved on a plan subject to G.L. c 41, s. 81P. 

c. The slope of land at any point, stated as a percentage, shall be defined as the 
change in elevation over a horizontal distance measured perpendicular to the 
contours divided by the distance over which the change occurs multiplied by 100. 

Slope = (Change in elevation/Horizontal distance measured perpendicular to 
contours) x 100 

d. All natural slopes over 35 percent on a building lot are protected and shall remain 
in their natural state. 

e. All areas with natural slopes exceeding 25 percent shall be excluded from the 
calculation of the minimum lot area required for the applicable zoning district. 

f. The Planning Board may grant a special permit from the provisions of this 
subsection VLB. 12, if in the Board's opinion, the proposal satisfies the purposes 
of subsection a. above. 

or take any other action related thereto. 



WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, transfer from available funds or 
any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $20,000 for the purpose of a study 
to evaluate the fiscal impacts of residential development in the Town; based upon analysis of the 
data gathered, the study will make findings and recommendations as to the need to limit or control 
the rate of residential growth through by-laws, regulations, or other methods, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 8 as printed in the 
Warrant 

An amendment was moved and seconded that the results of the $20,000 study be reported by the 
next Town Meeting by as group to be comprised of interested citizens, town boards and town 
officials. 

The motion was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

A motion was made and seconded and it was VOTED to close debate. 

VOTE: Yes: 499 No: A 2/3 vote is required 

The original motion was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $3,500,000 for 
the acquisition of land for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $1,500,000 be hereby 
appropriated for the acquisition of land for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 
40, Section 8C, of the Massachusetts General Laws, and that to raise this appropriation, the 



169 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 23. 1996 

Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $1,500,000 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town, therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 500 NO: 9 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Conservation Commission: Approval 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds 
or any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $28,000 for the acquisition by 
purchase or lease of a passenger van for use by the Department of Community Services and 
Andover Youth Services for the purposes of social, cultural, educational and recreational 
programs, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Carole Chanler and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 10 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee: Disapproval 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $180,000 for 
the purpose of reconstructing the existing sidewalk on both sides of Maple Avenue, including the 
installation of granite curb, restoring the planting strip between the sidewalk and curb, replacing 
missing trees, and other costs incidental or related thereto, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On petition of Harry L. Voorhees, Jr. and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate the sum of $180,000 for the purpose of reconstructing the existing sidewalk on both 
sides of Maple Avenue, including the installation of granite curb, restoring the planting strip 
between the sidewalk and curb, replacing missing trees, and other costs incidental or related 
thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

Article 1 1 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Yes: 95 No: 277 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee. Disapproval 

Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $40,000 for 
required improvements to Colonial Drive to meet Town standards, including costs incidental and 
related thereto; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by 
purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On petition of Karen Schnorrenberg and others. 

170 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 23. 19 9 6 

Article 12 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Yes: 112 No: 99 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will take by eminent domain and accept as a public way a 
street known as "Colonial Drive" as shown on a plan entitled Colonial Drive at Andover prepared 
by Merrimack Engineering Services, dated June 1985, said plan being recorded in the North Essex 
Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 10062. 

On petition of Karen Schnorrenberg and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 13 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Town Charter a requirement that 
whenever the Town shall undertake to construct or improve a school building or property, one 
member of the School Committee and an administrative representative of the Superintendent of 
Schools be appointed by the School Committee to serve of the School Building Committee to 
which the planning and construction or other acquisition of such school building or property is 
delegated; and to authorize the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to petition the General 
Court for special legislation to accomplish the foregoing, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of the Andover School Committee and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 14 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
School Committee: Approval 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept an 
easement for highway purposes on land along Jenkins Road as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of 
Land in Andover, Mass. Drawn for Robert Peterson, 1807 Bridge Street, Dracut, Mass. 01826 
Scale: 1" = 100', Date: Sept. 20, 1996 by Merrimack Engineering Services, 66 Park Street, 
Andover, MA 01810" on file at the Town Clerk's office and to be recorded at the Registry of 
Deeds, on terms and conditions acceptable to the Selectmen, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On petition of Anne E. Pettigrew and others. 

Upon motion made and seconded it was moved to accept Article 15 as printed in the Warrant. 

An amendment was made and seconded to delete the words " for highway purposes" in the 
second line and substitute therefore the following words: "for an unpaved shoulder". 

The Article to read: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept an easement for an 
unpaved shoulder on land along Jenkins Road as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Andover, Mass. Drawn for Robert Peterson, 1807 Bridge Street, Dracut, Mass. 01826 Scale: 1" 
= 100', Date: Sept. 20, 1996 by Merrimack Engineering Services, 66 Park Street, Andover, MA 
01810" on file at the Town Clerk's office and to be recorded at the Registry of Deeds, on terms 
and conditions acceptable to the Selectmen, or take any other action related thereto. 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

Article 1 5 was Approved as amended by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Planning Board: No Vote , -. , 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 23. 1996 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law in Section IV 
Use Regulations, Subsection B, Table of Use Regulations, by changing Use #18 as it relates to the 
Mixed Use Zone by changing the designation "N" to be "BA". 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others 

WITHDRAWN 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote 
to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 1 1:34 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



tJidLAmstMo 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



172 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

SS. 

To either or the Constables of the Ton n of Andover 

GREETING: 

in lite name of the Coinnionwcnltli, you are hereby required l<> notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town who arc 
qualified to vote in Elections to vote at: 

PRECINCTS: 1,3,8 Andover Senior Citizen, Whittier Court 

PRECINCTS: 2,4,5,6,7 Andover High School Field House, Shawsheen Road 

on TUESDAY, THE FIFTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1996 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 
To cast their vote in the State Election for the Candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

U.S. SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

COUNCILLOR FIFTH DISTRICT 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT SECOND ESSEX & MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT SEVENTEENTH ESSEX DISTRICT 

Precincts 1,2,3,4,6,7,8 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT EIGHTEENTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

Precinct 5 

REGISTER OF PROBATE ESSEX COUNTY 

COUNTY TREASURER ESSEX COUNTY 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER ESSEX COUNTY 

QUESTIONS 

#1 - CHANGING THE TRAPPING AND HUNTING LAWS 

Hereof fail not to make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of 

said meeting. 

Given under our hands the 21st day of October, 1996. 

James M. Barenboim 
Gerald II. Silverman 
William T. Downs 
Larry L. Larsen 
Barry F. Finegold , 



Selectmen of Andover 



A true copy 
ATTEST 

John F. Manning Date: October 23, 1996 

Constable 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purpose stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and 
attested copy of same on the Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public places where bills 
and notices are usually posted. Said warrants have been seven days. 



John F. Manning, Constable 



173 



NOVEMBER 5, 1996 



STATE ELECTION TOTAL: 



STATE ELECTION 



15,938 
Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Precinct 3 Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Precinct 6 Precinct 7 Precinct 8 TOTAL 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT 




















AND VICE PRESIDENT 




















Browne & Jorgensen 


23 


21 


15 


20 


23 


12 


7 


13 


134 


Clinton & Gore 


997 


1002 


1022 


963 


974 


978 


972 


998 


7906 


Dole & Kemp 


666 


789 


722 


842 


996 


908 


753 


928 


6604 


Hagelin & Tompkins 


5 


1 


6 


10 


2 


1 


4 


4 


33 


Moorehead & LaRIVA 


2 


4 


2 











2 


2 


12 


Perot & Choale 


96 


163 


115 


161 


141 


139 


141 


126 


1084 


Ralph Nadar 


15 


5 


2 


1 


7 


2 


5 


5 


42 


Pat Buchanan 

















1 








1 


Colin Powell 


3 











1 











4 


All Others 


4 


1 


1 


5 


8 





4 


2 


25 


Blanks 


13 


9 


10 


14 


8 


11 


11 


17 


93 


Total 


1826 


1995 


1895 


2016 


2160 


2052 


1899 


2095 


15938 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 




















John F. Kerry 


866 


847 


838 


799 


745 


773 


793 


808 


6469 


William F. Weld 


909 


1097 


1007 


1160 


1365 


1234 


1059 


1229 


9060 


Susan C. Gallagher 


32 


35 


38 


39 


38 


33 


37 


44 


296 


Robert C. Stowe 


5 


4 


2 


6 


3 


3 


4 


2 


29 


All Others 





1 


1 














1 


3 


Blanks 


14 


11 


9 


12 


9 


9 


6 


11 


81 


Total 


1826 


1995 


1895 


2016 


2160 


2052 


1899 


2095 


15938 


REPRESENATIVE IN CONGRESS 




















Martin T. Meehan 


1270 


1408 


1331 


1426 


1486 


1400 


1379 


1390 


11090 


All Others 


12 


25 


27 


23 


42 


26 


20 


41 


216 


Blanks 


544 


562 


537 


567 


632 


626 


500 


664 


4632 


Total 


1826 


1995 


1895 


2016 


2160 


2052 


1899 


2095 


15938 


COUNCILLOR 




















Particia Dowling 


1029 


1070 


1053 


1038 


1035 


1061 


968 


968 


8222 


Kevin J. Leach 


529 


657 


588 


720 


843 


733 


693 


821 


5584 


All Others 


4 





1 





1 


3 


1 


1 


11 


Blanks 


264 


268 


253 


258 


281 


255 


237 


305 


2121 


Total 


1826 


1995 


1895 


2016 


2160 


2052 


1899 


2095 


15938 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 




















John D. O'Brien 


1285 


1408 


1320 


1400 


1441 


1388 


1367 


1390 


10999 


All Others 


5 


13 


16 


15 


18 


18 


10 


21 


116 


Blanks 


536 


574 


559 


601 


701 


646 


522 


684 


4823 


Total 


1826 


1995 


1895 


2016 


2160 


2052 


1899 


2095 


15938 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 


















Seventeenth Essex District 




















Barry R. Finegold 


929 


922 


872 


988 





985 


975 


959 


6630 


James E. Fox 


806 


1004 


956 


941 





993 


870 


1043 


6613 


Susan Tucker 


8 


1 


1 





- 





4 


6 


20 


All Others 





4 


2 


3 








2 





11 


Blanks 


83 


64 


64 


84 





74 


48 


87 


504 


Total 


1826 


1995 


1895 


2016 





2052 


1899 


2095 


13778 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 



Eighteenth Middlesex District 




















Edward A. LeLacheur 














1229 











1229 


All Others 














33 











33 


Blanks 














898 











898 


Total 














2160 











2160 


REGISTER OF PROBATE 




















Pamela Casey O'Brien 


836 


900 


848 


838 


798 


842 


819 


790 


6671 


Jane Brady Stirgwolt 


703 


823 


778 


879 


1026 


906 


818 


980 


6913 


All Others 








1 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


10 


Blanks 


287 


272 


268 


296 


334 


302 


261 


324 


2344 


Total 


1826 


1995 


1895 


2016 


2160 


2052 


1899 


2095 


15938 


COUNTY TREASURER 




















Timothy A. Bassett 


861 


924 


914 


876 


829 


854 


852 


846 


6956 


George K. Mazareas 


595 


742 


654 


779 


925 


822 


733 


875 


6125 


All Others 


1 





2 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


11 


Blanks 


369 


329 


325 


360 


403 


375 


313 


372 


2846 


Total 


1826 


1995 


1895 


2016 


2160 


2052 


1899 


2095 


15938 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 




















Margurtile P. Kane 


1046 


1144 


1132 


1163 


1179 


1133 


1089 


11156 


19042 


John V. O'Brien 


695 


757 


728 


740 


825 


823 


751 


798 


6117 


All Others 


3 


10 


13 


10 


IB 


28 


14 


28 


124 


Blanks 


1908 


2079 


1917 


2119 


2298 


2120 


1944 


2208 


16593 


Total 


3652 


3990 


3790 


4032 


4320 


4104 


3798 


14190 


41876 


QUESTION 1 




















Yes 


1204 


1205 


1237 


1226 


1366 


1285 


1221 


1261 


10005 


No 


488 


656 


531 


653 


690 


668 


594 


721 


5001 


Blanks 


134 


134 


127 


137 


104 


99 


84 


113 


932 




1826 


1995 


1895 


2016 


2160 


2052 


1899 


2095 


15938 



174 



STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 5, 1996 



QUESTION 1 CHANGING THE TRAPPING AND HUNTING LAWS 

This proposed law would prohibit the use of certain traps for fur-bearing mammals, prohibit 
certain methods of hunting bear or bobcat, and eliminates some restrictions on who may serve on 
the state Fisheries and Wildlife Board. 

The proposed law would prohibit the use, setting, manufacture, or possession of any trap to 
capture fur-bearing mammals, except common mouse and rat traps, nets, and box or cage traps 
that confine a whole animal without grasping any part of it Traps designed to grip an animal's 
body or body part, such as steel jaw leghold traps, padded leghold traps, and snares, would be 
prohibited Federal and state health officials could use such traps in case of a threat to human 
health or safety. Where a property owner had reasonably tried but failed to correct an animal 
problem on the property using a legal trap, the owner could apply for and the state Director of 
Fisheries and Wildlife could issue a permit to use a prohibited type of trap, except a leghold trap, 
for up to 30 days to correct the problem. 

A person violating any of these requirements could be punished by a fine of between $300 and 
SI 000, or imprisonment for up to 6 months, or both, for each prohibited trap and each day of 
violation. A person convicted for a second violation would be required to surrender, and could 
never again obtain, any trapping license or problem animal control permit. 

The proposed law would also prohibit the pursuit or hunting of bear or bobcat with the aid of a 
dog or dogs. Hunting bear using any type of bait, lure, or attraction, or knowingly hunting bear in 
a baited area, would also be prohibited. The Director could allow the use of dogs or bait in 
legitimate scientific research projects and in order to control particular animals that posed a threat 
to human safety or that destroyed livestock, property, or crops. 

Violators could be punished by a fine of between $300 and $1000, or imprisonment for up to 6 
months, or both, for each violation A person convicted for a second violation would be required 
to surrender, and could never again obtain, any hunting and dog training licenses and permits. 

The proposed law would eliminate the requirement that five members of the state Fisheries and 
Wildlife Board have held sporting licenses in the state for five consecutive years and that four 
members represent fishing, hunting and trapping interests. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were declared invalid, the other provisions 
would remain in effect. 



175 







DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1996 

ELECTED 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James M. Barenboim, Ch. - 1997 
Gerald H. Silverman - 1998 
William T. Downs - 1999 

Larry L. Larsen - 1997 

Charles H. Wesson, Jr.* - 1997 
♦filling the term of Barry R.Finegold 
who was elected State Representative 
in November, 1996 election 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Tina Girdwood, Ch. - 1998 

David A. Birnbach - 1998 

Lloyd J. Willey - 1997 

Susan T. Dalton - 1997 

Eric J. Nadworny - 1999 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Ronald C. Hajj, Ch. - 2001 
Jason V. Fox - 2000 

Norma Villareal - 1998 

James A. Cuticchia - 1999 

Hartley M. Burnham* - 2 001 
* Appointed by Commissioner 
of Dept. of Comm. Affairs 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch. , Lawr. 
Joseph M. Gleason, Andover 
Terrence M. Breen, Methuen 
Michael E. Condon, Methuen 
Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 
Robert T. McCann, Lawrence 
John J. Caffrey, No. Andover 



TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty 



- 1997 



TRUSTEES. CORNELL FUND 

John H. Caswell - 1998 

Edwin F. Reidel - 1999 

Virginia H. Cole - 1997 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

Earl G. Efinger - 1997 

Joan M. Lewis - 1997 

John R. Petty - 1997 

Robert A. Finlayson - 1997 
Donna C. Ellsworth - 1997 

Reverend Calvin F. Mutti 
Reverend James M. Diamond 
Reverend Joseph W. LaDu 



176 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Donald F. Schroeder, Ch. 
Thomas E. Fardy 
Gerald T. Mulligan 
Joanne F. Marden 
William T. Novelline, Jr. 
Margaret I . Jurgen 
Anthony J. Sakowich 
Donald W. Robb 
Richard D. Fox 

PLANNING BOARD 

Michael H. Miller, Ch. 

Paul J. Salafia 

Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 

Susan A. Alovisetti 

Linn N. Anderson 

Robert G. Goodwin, Assoc. Member 

TRUSTEES. MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Karen M. Herman, Ch. 
Martin Klein 
Thomas J. Swift 
Laurence J. Lamagna 
Ruth M. Dunbar 
Patricia H. Edmonds 
Maria A. Rizzo 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

William J. Krajeski 
Archibald D. Maclaren 
John R. Petty 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Daniel S. Casper, Ch, 
Pamela H. Mitchell 
Paul Bevacqua 
Peter F. Reilly 
Carol C. McDonough 

Associate Members: 
Donald K. Ellsworth 
David W. Brown 
Alan R. Shulman 
John F. Bradley II 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Wendall A. Mattheson 
Carolyn A. Simko 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Robert A. Pustell, Ch. 
Donald D. Cooper 
Paul J. Finger 
Mark R. DeLisio 
Walter Bird, III 
Joyce J. Robinson 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar, Ch, 
Dr. Stephen Loring 
Frederick M. Childs 

GR. LAWR. SANITARY DISTRICT 

Robert E. McQuade 



TOWLE FUND 

Phillip F. Sullivan 
Ruth E. Westcott 
Marilyn R. Brody 

DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 

Ann E. Constantine 
Donald J. Harding 
Susan W. Alovisetti 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Karen M. Herman, Ch. 

Ann E. Constantine 

Norma A. Gammon 

James S. Batchelder 

Stephen W. Kearn 

Dennis C. Ingram 

Raymond H. Flynn 

John S. Sullivan, Emeritus 



177 



ANDOVER CULTURAL COUNCIL 

John Zipeto, Ch. 
Marcel le Gregg 
Mark E. Efinger 
Sharon R. Mason 
Anne M. Sullivan 
Gail L. Ralston 
Selma P. Flieder 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Martin Epstein, Ch. 

Dorothy L. Bresnahan 

Paul J. Salafia 

Robert J. Schreiber, M.D. 

Arthur W. Smith 

Deborah Silberstein 

Paul L. Twomey 

Oscar Rosenberg 

Marlies Zammuto 

Elizabeth Tice 

Thomas F. Powers, Emeritus 

Robert P. Kenney, Emeritis 



RETIREMENT BOARD 

William T. Downs 
James A. Cuticchia 
John C. Doherty 
Rodney P. Smith 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

James M. Marsh, Ch. 

Marjorie E. Dennis 

Gilbert E. Martin, Jr. 

Michael P. Parsons 

Susan E. Jenkins 

Edward A. Kelley 

Steven Bouley* 

*School Committee's Designee 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John R. Dempsey. Ch. 
Annetta R. Freedman 
Barbara Worcester 
James M. Lyman 

INDUSTRIAL DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Michael W. Morris 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 

John J. Lewis 
John A. Campbell 
John C. Doherty 
Harold W. Wright 
Calvin A. Deyermond 
Edward J. Morrissey 
Edward Cole 
Susan W. Ratya 
James M. Deyermond 

350TH ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 

Norma A. Gammon, Ch. 
James D. Doherty 
Robert W. Phinney 
Mary L. Ordman 
Frederic A. Stott 
Cynthia J. Milne 
Charles H. Murnane, Jr. 
Stephen W. Kearn 
Robert J. Macartney 
Karen M. Herman 
Ann E. Constantine 
John S. Sullivan 
David F. Lynch 
Mary C. Moran 
James J. Redmond, Jr. 
James S. Batchelder 
Arnold W. Dyer, Jr. 
Paul D. Murphy 
V. David Rodger 
Virginia L. Begg 
Mary W. Moran 
James F. Bedford 

DEVELOPMENT & INDUSTRIAL COMM. 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Robert A. Finlayson 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
S. Joseph Hoffman 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 

Mark J. Walker, Ch. 
Michael A. Warshawsky 
Gina B. LaFortune, Esq. 
Paul A. Clinton 
Neil R. Gordon 
David E. Ray 
James Wiseman 
Timothy J. McCarron 



178 



OPEN SPACE & OUTDOOR RECREATION PLAN COMM, 

Walter Bird, III, Ch. 

Gail L. Ralston 

Alan F. French 

Steven Golden 

Brendan J. Dugan 

Mark R. DeLisio 

Mark J. Walker 

Susan W. Alovisetti 

Arthur W. Smith 

William S. Macleod 

Virginia H. Cole 

John D. Fitzpatrick 

Thomas F. Russell 

Ronald R. Hill 

Peggy Keck 

Dr. Douglas M. Dunbar 

BALLARDVALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMM. 

Richard J. Bowen, Ch. 
Charles H. Murnane, Jr. 
Dennis C. Ingram 
Sherron Heller 
Helene Roberts 
Diane R. Derby 
Perry M. Raffi 
Ron Abraham, Alternate 
Kevin Byrne, Alternate 



ZONING BYLAW TASK FORCE 

Michael H. Miller, Ch. 
Carol C. McDonough 
Stephen D. Anderson 
Daniel S. Casper 
Paul J. Finger 
Steven L. Burdeau 

YOUTH COUNCIL 

Brian P. Major 
Kathleen M. Hess 
Colleen Georgian 

SPRINGGROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 

Paul W. Cronin, Ch. - 
Charles A. Bergeron 
John W. Crow 
Robert S. Hamilton 
Arthur H. Richter 

COMMUNITY ACTION COUNCIL 

Robert Minasian, Esq. 

MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMM. 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 

HOUSlNGPARTNERSHIP/FAmHOUSING 

David Hastings 
Christopher D. Haynes 
Lorene A. Comeau 






179 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 

Animal Inspector Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

Civil Defense Director James F. Johnson 

Community Development Department 

Director of Health Everett F. Penney 

Director of Planning Stephen L. Colyer 

Conservation Administrator James A. Greer 

Inspector of Buildings Kaija M. Gilmore 

Electrical Inspector Richard J. Salenas 

Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector Bruce P. Hale 

Council On Aging Jeanne M. Madden 

Finance and Budget Director Anthony J. Torrisi 

Chief Assessor William J. Krajeski 

. Collector/Treasurer David J. Reilly 

Data Processing Manager Barbara D. Morache 

Purchasing Agent John W. Aulson 

Veterans Service Agent John J. Lewis 

Fire Chief Harold J. Wright 

Housing Authority Executive Director Kenneth Dorrance 

Municipal Maintenance Director Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Building Superintendent Kenneth H. Parker 

Forester (Cemetery, Forestry, Parks) . . . . . James M. Bamford 

Personnel Director Candace Hall 

Police Chief James F. Johnson 

Animal Control Officer Wayne D. Nader 

Public Works Director Robert E. McQuade 

Highway Superintendent John F. Canavan, Jr. 

Town Engineer Brian W. Moore 

Memorial Hall Library Director James E. Sutton 

Superintendent of Schools Richard E. Neal 

Town Accountant Rodney P. Smith 

Town Clerk Randall L. Hanson 

Town Counsel Thomas J. Urbelis 

Town Manager Reginald S. Stapczynski 



180 



HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

**************** 

Mailing Address: 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 

Business Hours at the Town Offices: 

8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 
(Building Division - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 

Telephone Numbers: 

POLICE/FIRE - EMERGENCY 9 1 1 

Town Offices Switchboard 623-8200 

Fax Number 623-8221 

DCS Classes & Activities 623-8273/8274 

Department of Public Works 623-8350 

Police Department - Business 475-04 1 1 

Fire Department - Business 623-8466 

Animal Control Officer 475-04 1 1 

Memorial Hall Library 623-8400 

Senior Center 623-8321 

Superintendent of Schools 623-8501 

Personnel Office 623-8530 

Andover's Home Page: http:/www.town.andover.ma.us 

Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: www.mhl.org 

Andover's Population: 29,846 Square Miles: 32 

Number of Acres: 19,900 

1,500 (7.5%) controlled by Conservation Comm. 
1,000 (5%) owned by A.V.I.S. 
889 (4.5%) owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 

Andover's Tax Rate: $15.48 - Residential and Open Space 

$22.57 - Commerical/Industrial & Personal Property 

When are taxes due: Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 

August 1st - November 1st - February 1st - May 1st 

181 



Excise tax information: 



Call Assessor's Office at 623-8264 



Recycling: 



Curbside Pickup: Every other week - recyclables (glass - clear, green & brown - 
newspapers, magazines, and steel & tin cans - crush/flatten) will be 
collected on the same day as the trash collection. Place recycling bin 
curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pick up day. 

Recycling information & complaints: Call Waste Management, Inc. at 1-800-562-0321 

Recycling Site: Third Saturday of each month at West Middle School from 9:00 A.M. 

to 1 :00 P.M. Plastics (#1 & #2) and aluminum materials. 



Compost Site: 



High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings. Open 
year round for walk-ins, drive-ins as announced in local newspapers. 



Rubbish Complaints or Inquiries: Vining Disposal at 1-800-432-9996 

Pothole or Snow Removal Complaints: Highway Division at 623-8426 or 

Dept. of Public Works at 623-8350 

How to dispose of an appliance: Appliances can no longer be left curbside with your trash - 

their disposal is the homeowner's responsibility. Suggestions 
for disposal: hire a private contractor or check with the 
company where your new appliance was purchased to see if 
they will take the old appliance. 



Town Meeting and Election: 



Town Election is held the fourth Monday of March. Andover 
has an Open Town Meeting which is generally held three 
weeks following the Town Election. . 



Voter Registration Information: Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 



Where to obtain a Birth Certificate: 



Town Clerk's Office 



Where to obtain a Marriage License: Town Clerk's Office 
Where to obtain a Fishing & Hunting License: Town Clerk's Office 



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HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 



UNITED STATES SENATORS: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

(617)565-3170 

SR-315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-4543 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, Boston, MA 021 14 

(617) 565-8519 

SR-362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-2742 

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01852 

(508)459-0101 

1216 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 

(202)225-3411 

STATE SENATOR: 

John D. O'Brien, Jr. (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

23 7 Highland Road, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 416B, Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-1612 

STATE REPRESENTATIVES: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District 

1 1 Lavender Hill Drive, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 436, Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-2800 ext. 7303 

Edward A. LeLacheur (D) 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

63 Fruit Street, Lowell, MA 01852 

State House, Room 146, Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2582 

******* 

183 



WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and comments about our 
municipal services and policies, or any general comments you may have about the Town of Andover. 
Please let us know what you think on this survey and return it to: 



TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 

TOWN OFFICES 

36 BARTLET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 




James M. Barenboim 
Chairman, Board of Selectmen 




jginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 




Tell us one thing that you really like that the Town does. 



Tell us one thing that you would like to see improved upon. 



Name and address 
(Optional) 

184 



1 

i 



INDEX 



Animal Inspection 66 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Community Dev. & Planning 25 

Building Division 25 

Conservation Division 29A 

Electrical Inspection 29 

Health Division 30 

Planning Division 33 

Plumbing & Gas Inspection 29 

Zoning Board of Appeals 34 

Community Services 67 

Directory of Town Officials 176 

Directory of Dept./Div. Heads 180 

Division of Elder Services 41 

Finance & Budget 6 

Assessors 10 

Central Purchasing 7 

Collector/Treasurer 8 

Information Systems : . r . 9 

Veterans Services 9 

Financial Statements 89 

Fire Department 62 

Gr. Lawrence Voc. Tech. HS 68 

Housing Authority 87 

How to Reach Elected Officials 1 83 

How Can We Help You? 181 

John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund 88 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 88 



Memorial Hall Library 38 

Municipal Maintenance 17 

Building Maintenance & Electrical Mechanical .... 17 

Forestry 20 

Municipal Buildings 22 

Parks 19 

Spring Grove Cemetery 20 

Vehicle Maintenance 21 

Personnel 73 

Police Department 51 

Animal Control 54 

Emergency Management 54 

Preservation Commission 85 

Public Works Department 47 

Engineering 47 

Gr. Lawrence Sanitary District 49 

Highway 48 

Sewer 49 

Solid Waste 49 

Water 50 

School Building Committee , 84 

School Department 69 

350th Anniversary Committee 5 

Town Clerk 36 

Town Counsel 16 

Town Manager 1 

Town Meeting Minutes 109 

Tr. Punchard Free School 106 



We Would Like To Hear From You 184